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Museal Practices and Cultural Politics of Exhibiting Popular Music

updated: 
Sunday, January 3, 2016 - 6:04am
Lars Kaijser, Stockholm University, Sweden, and Klara Stephanie Szlezák, Passau University, Germany

No longer limited to records, stages, and videos, popular music has widened its sphere of influence by entering the realm of museums and tourism. For the past decades, popular music themed exhibitions have multiplied as well as diversified, and have in the process gained growing visibility and cultural momentum. Be it in the form of spatially fixed museum spaces that draw international audiences, or be it in the form of traveling exhibits that transport displays across the limits of cities and nations: Exhibitions revolving around popular music participate in and contribute to the global circulation of meanings, values, and emotions ascribed to and associated with diverse genres of and eras in popular music.

Extension: Stony Brook University 2016 graduate conference - Communication in the Humanities: abstracts due 1/16; conference 3/5

updated: 
Sunday, January 3, 2016 - 1:39am
Stony Brook English Graduate Conference

The deadline for submissions has been extended to January 16th. Please consider submitting individual abstracts or full paper proposals.

Speaking Text(s): Communication in the Humanities

We are pleased to invite proposals for the 28th annual graduate conference presented by Stony Brook University's Graduate English Society.

Queer Death, De(con)struction, and Contagion: Affective Rhythms in Interdisciplinary Studies

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 7:08pm
University of California, Merced/Queer Theory Symposium Committee

Inaugural Interdisciplinary Queer Studies Symposium
University of California, Merced
Saturday, April 16th, 2016

Keynote: Eric A. Stanley, UC Riverside

Eric A. Stanley is an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Along with Chris Vargas, Eric directed the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2015). A coeditor of the anthology Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, 2011) which won the Prevention for a Safe Society award and was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, Eric's other writing can be found in the journals Social Text, American Quarterly, Women and Performance, and TSQ.

What Next? The Episodic and The Serial--MLA in Philadelphia 2017--deadline 10 February

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 6:13pm
Katherine Fusco/MLA Philadelphia

This proposed special session on the episodic and the serial invites participants to consider the limitations and opportunities offered by episodic and serial forms across a variety of media (film, comics, novels, the poetic sequence, the podcast, etc.). Papers may consider such issues as narrative, temporality, identity, media ecology, and/or technology and aesthetics. To explore our topic, we will use Pecha Kucha presentations, an appropriate format for our subject!

300-word abstract by 10 Feb 2016; Katherine Fusco (fusco.katherine@gmail.com)

REMINDER_DUE JAN. 15 Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities and Public Ethics 3.1 (April 2016)

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 4:35pm
Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics

Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics—a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary online journal and digital forum—invites submissions for its April 2016 issue. For this issue of the Ethos journal, we invite submissions of original scholarly work that consider topics relevant to the project's intellectual interests in the arts, humanities, and public ethics. Articles may explore literary texts, film, music, trends in cultural criticism and "theory," or issues of wider social and political concern. Interested contributors are encouraged to browse through our digital archive of forum posts and journal issues to learn more about the range of topics featured on the project.

[REMINDER] Old and New Humanism(s) UNC Graduate Conference-

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 12:30pm
Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Old and New Humanism(s): Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Humanism—the renowned contribution of the Renaissance to academic inquiry and creative endeavors—began as a movement to recover the classical past and to explore what it means to be human. However, as a way of living, humanism did not always align with contemporary views on politics, education, religion, and culture. Thus, humanism has been a subject of debate since its origins. These conflicts still reverberate in our own discussions with regard to the pertinence and role of the humanities today.

CFP 4th Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies at Indiana University [DEADLINE EXTENDED]

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 10:24am
Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University (ART@IU)

4th Annual Graduate Symposium on Theatre and Performance Studies
Hosted by the Association for Research in Theatre at Indiana University (ART@IU)

Replotting Performance

Jon McKenzie, in his 2001 book Perform or Else, makes the prediction that "performance will be to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries what discipline was to the eighteenth and nineteenth, that is an onto-historical formation of power and knowledge" (18).

Dramatising death and dying in British, Northern Irish and Irish drama and theatre

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 9:55am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

Medieval drama taught its audiences not only about virtuous living but, more importantly, a good death and a joyful afterlife. Miracle plays re-played the most significant and most spectacular deaths known from the Gospels, while morality plays, such as Everyman, imagined the act of dying and the prospects for posthumous happiness of their main characters.

[UPDATE] Literary Form and Reform [Shanghai, 17-18 May, 2016, Abstracts due February 29, 2016]

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 1:59am
Nan Zhang; Miles Link, Fudan University

The resurgence of formalist interests in recent years has sparked new discussions of the conception, role, and significance of form in literary and cultural studies as well as pedagogies. In her 2007 PMLA essay "What Is New Formalism," Marjorie Levinson lays out several strains of new formalism emerging in the American academy, which simultaneously embrace a renewal of attention to aesthetic form and express divergent emphases and agendas.

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