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journals and collections of essays

Queer Worldmaking

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:19pm
QED:
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

QED: A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking (published 3 times/yr.) brings together scholars, activists, public intellectuals, artists, and policy and culture makers to discuss and mobilize issues and initiatives that matter to the diverse lived experience, struggle, and transformation of LGBTQ peoples and communities wherever they may be. With an emphasis on worldmaking praxis, QED welcomes theory, criticism, history, policy analysis, public argument, and creative exhibition, seeking to foster intellectual and activist work through essays, commentaries, interviews, roundtable discussions, and book and event reviews. Our use of the term “worldmaking” is much more deliberate in its derivation.

The Global English Department

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:34pm
Ashley Squires, Myles Chilton
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

The Global English Department

(Edited Collection)

Editors: 

Ashley Squires, New Economic School

Myles Chilton, Nihon University

  

Special Issue: Adaptation and Nostalgia

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:15pm
Adaptation (Oxford Journals)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 31, 2019

Adaptation, like nostalgia, is inextricably linked to the past. Both must grapple with the politics, pragmatics, and poetics of bringing the past into the present; and, in so doing, adaptation and nostalgia must also wrestle with one another.

DECADENCE [Call for Papers/Reviews]

updated: 
Saturday, December 8, 2018 - 10:55am
University College London, Dept of English [Moveable Type, Vol. 11 (Summer 2019)]
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

Montesquieu's assertion that the fall of the Roman Empire could be attributed to a decline in morality and deviation from Classical ideals redefined the term “décadence.” From a neutral term for “decline,” decadence transformed into a laden pejorative signifying perversity and decay, as well as a warning against the dangers of excess and the pursuit of pleasure. Perceived as a disruptive force, dangerous to social order and bourgeois normativity, the threat of decadence is still invoked in modern political rhetoric to stoke anxieties over shifts in traditional values and social mores, as well as the looming threat of an irretrievable loss of geopolitical power.

Essay Collection: Joyce Writing Disability

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:23pm
Jeremy Colangelo / Hunan Normal University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 1, 2019

Joyce Writing Disability is a proposed volume of essays on the history, theory, and depiction of disability as it relates to the life and work of James Joyce. Though disability is increasingly a popular topic in modernist studies, there is as yet no book dedicated to disability and/in Joyce. As such, Joyce Writing Disability will seek not to be the last word on the topic, but the first. We seek essays on a variety of topics and intersections, and are especially interested in readings that open novel and unexplored avenues for disability studies and Joyce criticism. Two major university presses have expressed an interest in the volume, and we are looking for contributions from scholars both established and new.

 

update: call for book chapters: critical essays on Trump in literature, film, and television

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 9:40pm
Stephen Hock / Virginia Wesleyan University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

I am seeking proposals for chapters to complete an edited collection on treatments of Donald Trump in literature, film, and television, tentatively titled Trump Fiction, under contract for publication with Lexington Books, a division of Rowman & Littlefield.

Contributors must have a PhD.  

Call for “untimely reviews” in early modern theater

updated: 
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 10:04am
The Hare
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 8, 2018

We invite contributions focusing on early modern theater, including but not limited to Shakespeare’s plays. The Hare is an online, peer-reviewed journal, publishing untimely reviews of books, articles, and performances in early modern theater.

This journal provides a venue for the contention and reevaluation of old scholarly work in contemporary scholarly debate. We invite you to interpret “old” creatively, though traditional reviews of recent publications will not be considered. We welcome:

Jim Thompson and the American West: A Critical Collection

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:24pm
Meredith James
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

  Jim Thompson, a writer of hard-boiled crime fiction, was born in Anadarko, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), in 1906.  Thompson’s literary achievements were little-recognized during his lifetime; however, many of his works were re-discovered and re-published in the 1980s. His work is often lauded, noting his ability to understand the criminal mind.  His work is largely critiqued and categorized as only hard-boiled fiction, but his work defies such a simple genre classification.  Thompson combines the genres of crime fiction and Westerns and in doing so, his works read as critiques of American history and culture. Certainly much of Thompson’s work can be read as a critique of post-WWII America.  As David Cochrane points out Thompson’s works serve as “portrait

CFP (Book Chapter abstracts) Arkive City 2.0: Tracing Time in the Network Ages

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:24pm
Dr Julie Louise Bacon, UNSW Art & Design
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 17, 2018

Deadline for abstract submission: Monday 17th December 2018

Abstracts are invited for chapters in an anthology exploring the roles of archival practices and archives in the production of time and temporal relations in the 21st Century. Arkive City 2.0: Tracing Time in the Network Ages is planned for release in mid 2020. It will feature 18 chapters and 3 visual essays organised into sections on “Technology”, “Culture”, and “Time".

Societal Constructions of Masculinity in Latinx and Latin American Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:16pm
Edited Volume
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 18, 2019

Patriarchy, as defined by bell hooks, is a social disease. Hegemonic masculinity does not allow men to express their emotions, except through anger, violence and sex. Consequently, all who are in a relationship with men (parents, children, spouses, lovers, siblings, colleagues and friends) are likely to suffer from the manifestations of hegemonic masculine behavior, including the men themselves who must constantly repress their feelings.

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