all recent posts

[UPDATE] 2016 NeMLA Panel (Submit by September 30, 2015): On the Limits of Computational Analysis

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association

The following will be a panel at next year's NeMLA Conference, set to take place between March 17 and March 20 in Hartford, Connecticut.

The goal of this panel will be to discuss the restrictions that current and/or potential computational approaches to media analysis have and/or ought to have in an attempt to delimit the evolving roles of academics in the humanities. Presenters might consider the following topics:

Labyrinth as Paradigm in Late Medieval and Early Modern Cultures (ACLA 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:26pm
full name / name of organization: 
Victor Sierra Matute
contact email: 

The opening session of La métaphore du labyrinthe, an interdisciplinary seminar organized by Roland Barthes during 1978 and 1979, reached two principal conclusions: first, that despite the apparent chaos always linked to its semantics, the notion of 'labyrinth' actually implies "a factor of intentional and systematic construction"; second, that the labyrinthine structures have essentially a hermeneutic function. The wear and tear of the labyrinth as a metaphoric trope drove Barthes to conclude that maybe the labyrinth is but a "pseudo" metaphor, where the letter is richer than the symbol and thus, the labyrinth would engender narratives rather than images.

Edited collection on college movies, Nov. 1, 2015

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 10:18am
full name / name of organization: 
Randy Laist and Kip Kline

Movies about college have been a staple of American cinema since the silent era. Films like Harold Lloyd's The Freshman and Buster Keaton's College engaged popular ideas about the culture of campus life as it evolved throughout the 1920s, while also setting precedents for future cinematic representations of the college experience. Benchmark films of the genre such as The Paper Chase, Animal House, and The Social Network provide insight into the ways that college has been variously imagined as a middle class rite of passage, a landscape of hedonistic fantasy, a microcosm of societal hypocrisy, a repressive system of deindividuation, and a carnivalesque holiday from "real life," to name just a few of the most conspicuous themes.

Tracing Indo-American Encounters, 1780s-1880s (for ACLA 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 8:38am
full name / name of organization: 
Anupama Arora, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth; Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University

This seminar seeks to draw on the growing body of work oriented toward the transnational and global turn in American Studies to trace connections between the Indian subcontinent and the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We invite papers that examine the traffic (of ideas, texts, people, commodities) between India and the U.S. to provide a window into the ways in which India was part of the cultural landscape and imaginary of the U.S. from its inception, and performed important ideological work in domestic conversations such as those surrounding race, nation, religion, gender, and trade.

Hartford and Antebellum American Writing

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:36am
full name / name of organization: 
NEMLA: 3/17-3/20, 2016

The reputations of Hartford, Connecticut, residents Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain overshadow the city's antebellum authors. NeMLA 2016 seems ideally situated for a session to raise the academic appreciation and profile of earlier writers who contributed to Hartford's historical literary legacy, which includes Lydia Sigourney, Ann Plato, abolitionist ministers like Lyman Beecher and Amos G. Beman, and Hartford-born pamphlet writer Maria Stewart. Hartford was also a publishing center with a young Samuel G. Goodrich and later, Lewis Skinner, who printed Rev. James C. Pennington's book about African and African American history; lexicographer-journalist Noah Webster was of West Hartford, and The Charter Oak, was Hartford's anti-slavery newspaper.

Faulkner:Still Relevant?

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:49pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeastern Modern Language Association
contact email: 

Full information is available at

www.buffalo.edu/NeMLA

Abstracts must be submitted by September 30 2015 for the conference March 30 to April 3
the Hilton in historic district of Hartford Connecticut.

The Evidence of Realism (deadline 9/23/15; ACLA, Harvard 3/17-20/16)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:39pm
full name / name of organization: 
Geoffrey Baker

The Evidence of Realism

[For the annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association at Harvard University, March 17-20 2016]

How do texts--and especially realist texts--and their plots use or complicate the idea of evidence? What sort of evidence do such texts seem to assume readers require in order to encounter the "effect of the real"? And how do contemporaneous ideas of evidence from philosophy, legal theory, or science provide context for the consideration of evidence in literary works?

ASECS 2016: Transnational Exchanges: Gender and Embodiment; Deadline 9/15

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:17pm
full name / name of organization: 
American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (ASECS) March 31-April 3, 2016

This panel seeks to explore how and why did gender, especially within the context of sexual violence, courtship and marriage, citizenship and travel, function as transnational exchange and a prism for engaging reflection on national identity and difference in travel accounts, histories and fiction? Did such reflections assume some continuity across cultures about what was meant by "woman," "man,"? How might have "love" and "family," serve as modes of exchange across cultures? Were alternative accounts of these terms, particularly in narratives describing conflicts in cultural expectations, offer opportunities for reimagining gender roles?

The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Literature (NeMLA 2016 Roundtable 15845)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 8:23pm
full name / name of organization: 
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook

With dynamic individual superhero/superhuman characters populating a world of complex, interwoven mythologies and origin stories, the films and television series of Marvel Comics Studios present an experiment with long-form transmedia storytelling that is at once both commercially successful and critically acclaimed. Given the ongoing debate in film criticism and media studies surrounding the degree to which analyzing films as literature is useful (or not), that such a commercially popular phenomenon also emphasizes artistic elements (e.g.

The Monster In The House: Domestic Ideology in Superhero Narratives (NeMLA 2016 Panel 15842)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 8:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook

Deadline for abstract submissions: September 30th 2015

In worlds full of superhuman heroes, mythological imaginary creatures and battle narratives of epic scope, what is the role of the domestic? In the recently released film _Avengers: Age of Ultron_, the titular superheroes hide away not in a high-tech secured stronghold but in a farmhouse belonging to the archer Hawkeye, his wife, and their young children. Barton's presence as the film's only parent with a seemingly stable domestic lifestyle provides a temporary shelter for our heroes, illustrating how the domestic can function as a stable ground for the superhero narrative to withstand its otherwise fantastic, explosive elements.

Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Keridiana Chez
contact email: 

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 2:17pm
full name / name of organization: 
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016
contact email: 

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas. In the United States, for example, people may look to the Constitution and patriotic songs or even the bible as foundational texts--texts that define (and limit?) national identity. We often see events such as the Salem Witch Trials, the Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement as critical moments of national formation, while people such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. represent quintessential "Americans.". These foundational texts, events, and people work their way into literature and pop culture in myriad ways as authors, writers, poets, filmmakers and playwrights incorporate, reify, or challenge them through their works.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
full name / name of organization: 
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north
contact email: 

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
full name / name of organization: 
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University
contact email: 

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

Pages