Subscribe to RSS - medieval

medieval

Spenser at Kalamazoo, May 9-12, 2019

updated: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 10:19am
Spenser at Kalamazoo: International Congress of Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

SPENSER AT KALAMAZOO, MAY 9-12, 2019
54th International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan)

This year we have two open sessions on any topic dealing with Edmund Spenser, and one roundtable session on teaching Spenser. 

 

Reading time for papers in the open sessions should not exceed twenty minutes. 

 

Panelists in the roundtable on teaching will speak for five minutes each and distribute copies of a handout.  

 

As always, we encourage submissions by newcomers, including graduate students, and by established scholars of all ranks. 

 

Disability before disability in the medieval Icelandic sagas (ICMS, Kalamazoo 2019)

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 10:57am
Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This panel will consider the ways in which disability is represented in medieval Icelandic literature, particularly in medieval saga writing. Panellists will engage with the concept of disability beyond the traditional bio-medical understanding of the term, exploring disability as a social phenomenon embedded in social arrangements and cultural conventions. They will seek to understand what constituted disability in medieval Icelandic society, culture, and history prior to the establishment of disability as a modern legal, bureaucratic and administrative concept.

Ecocritical essays wanted on Arthurian legend

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 11:19am
Dr. Tim Wenzell/Virginia Union University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

Essays are invited from ecocritics, ecofeminists, ecopsychologists, Medievalists, and scholars for an anthology to be tentatively titled Eco D'Arthur: Green Camelot. The direction of current scholarhsip in ecocriticism focuses on science, ecology, and nature writing. More attention needs to be given to older literature, and in British literature, the medieval period. Though some attention has been given to Chaucer and to the period in general, there is relatively little ecocritical scholarship on Arthurian myth. This book- length work will analyze Arthurian myth through ecocritical/ecopsychological/ecofeminist perspectives. Indivudual essays might include:

 

Sanctifying Violence

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 10:27am
Lives and Afterlives The Forty-Fifth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium April 12-13, 2019 The University of the South, Sewanee, TN
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 26, 2018

Sanctifying Violence

Organizers: Elizabeth Maffetone and Joseph Morgan (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Female Agency in the Later Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 9:47am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Thirty years ago, in her seminal book, Holy Feast and Holy Fast: the Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women, Caroline Walker Bynum proposed that the later Middle Ages witnessed the rise of the first women’s movement in Christian history. Looking within and beyond the purview of religious devotion, this panel welcomes papers that corroborate, qualify, or critique Bynum’s claim by examining medieval representations of female agency. What constitutes female agency in late medieval literature, society and culture? To what end is it exerted? How and by whom is it celebrated and/or censured?

Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer: Literary, Economic, Political, and Spiritual Approaches

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:19pm
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

It is hard to exaggerate the novelty of English Treasurer Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer, completedc. 1179. Often considered Europe’s first administrative manual, it required the invention of a new genre, the systematic thinking-through of collected bureaucratic knowledge and its categorization and organization. Successive generations of historians have mined this text for data about England’s taxation office and common law, but it has much more to offer researchers of bureaucratic and institutional culture, medieval identity formation, and intertextuality. 

Approaches to Medieval Bureaucracies: A Roundtable

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:08pm
Special Session, 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Close to 100 years ago, T. F. Tout was able to claim in his magisterial six-volume study of England’s letter-writing offices that the administrative history of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century England was "largely unwritten.” Within the last ten or twenty years, however, historians have undertaken socio-cultural studies of medieval bureaucracy and its personnel, moving from prosopographical and biographical sketches to nuanced examinations of the experience and challenges of bureaucratic employment throughout Europe.

(Leeds IMC 2019) Materialities of Antipodal Medievalism: displaced materiality and cultural consumption of the northern Middle Ages for the peripheral medievalist.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:57pm
Roderick McDonald/Australian Early Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

The Australian Early Medieval Association (AEMA) invites paper proposals for a panel at IMC Leeds 2019

Abstract: Antipodes are periphery to the European core, and recent developments in decolonization and the Global Middle Ages have contributed to understanding the inherent nature of a core/periphery dialectic that subsists in medieval studies.

Access for antipodal scholars (however defined) to the materialities (the products, the evidence) of medieval cultures of the northern hemisphere is heavily mediated, through hegemonic and competing mechanisms of scholarship (such as the academy) as well as through non-formal means, including popular and social media.

Langland's Library (IPPS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Ann E. Killian, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 7, 2018

Paper Panel: “Langland’s Library”

Pages