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Alchemy: Exploring Metaphorical Transformations and Arts-Based Research

updated: 
Wednesday, July 17, 2024 - 4:08am
London Arts-Based Research Centre
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2024

Alchemy: Exploring Metaphorical Transformations and Arts-Based Research

A Transdisciplinary Conference

 

Date: November 9-10, 2024
Location: University of Oxford, UK
Online option available
Cost:        180 GBP
90 GBP (Online)
Abstract Deadline: August 31, 2024


Conference Webpage:
 https://labrc.co.uk/2024/04/21/alchemy/

Studies in Memory of Donald C. Baker (1928-2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 16, 2024 - 12:21pm
Mohsen HAMLI
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2024

Call for Essays

Studies in Memory of Donald C. Baker (1928-2019)

 

Call for essays for a book on the late medievalist Donald C. Baker who left us in 2019.

Donald C. Baker taught English Literature at the University of Colorado, Boulder, for twenty years then pursued teaching opportunities in Finland, England, Tunisia, Jordan, and Macau. 

Donald C. Baker published or co-published a variety of books and articles (in PMLA, Studia Neophilologica, Speculum, Studies in Philology, Philological Quarterly, The Literary)  on Geoffrey Chaucer and Beowulf in particular.

Staging Silence from Antiquity to the Renaissance

updated: 
Monday, July 15, 2024 - 2:30pm
University of Cambridge
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 9, 2025

STAGING SILENCE FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE RENAISSANCE

 

3–4 July 2025 / St John’s College, Cambridge

 

This two-day, in-person conference will explore developing traditions of silence in dramatic texts from antiquity to the Renaissance. Papers are sought from scholars across a range of fields, including classical reception, comparative literature, and medieval and/or early modern English literature. Topics may include:

 

-       mute characters and/or characters who never appear on stage;

-       characters who gain or lose the power of speech (welcoming perspectives e.g. from disability studies);

Cleveland Symposium 2024

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2024 - 3:57pm
Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2024

Moments, Intervals, Epochs: Time in the Visual Arts

50th Annual Cleveland Symposium

Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

Friday and Saturday, November 22-23, 2024

 

ICMS 2025: Science and Magic in Lawman and in the Brut Tradition (9/25; 5-8-10)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2024 - 3:51pm
Society for International Brut Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

This session engages recent scholarship on magic and science (or natural philosophy) in the Brut, as well as in the wider Brut tradition, including work on astronomy and on the Merlinian prophecies.   As evidence points to Lawman's participation in the intellectual, philosophical, and theological currents of late twelfth/early thirteenth-century England, the session invites proposals on topics related to science and magic--broadly conceived--in Lawman and in analogous Brut texts.  The session allows for a wide range of potential topics, including prophecy, demonology, astronomy, medicine, alchemy, the bestiary, dream theory, the miraculous, Welsh magical traditions, and other references to the natural and preternatural worlds.  Inclusion of other texts in

Session in Honor of Elizabeth J. Bryan: Collaborative Meaning and the Brut 9/15; 5/8-10

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2024 - 3:51pm
Society for International Brut Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

To honor the work of Elizabeth J. Bryan on Lawman and the English prose Brut, this session focuses on the collaborative nature of Brut texts.  By examining both literal collaborations between scribes, illuminators, and compilers, and collaboration broadly conceived, as between readers of Brut texts or between texts and editors to derive meaning, for instance, papers in the session will offer insight into the intricacies of the production and reception of Brut manuscripts.  Papers will advance conversations that, in Professor Bryan’s words, “make room in our critical model for the multiple participants of a manuscript text” (Collaborative Meaningxiv).

ICMS 2025: Postpandemic discourse in literature and art (Virtual panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2024 - 3:49pm
Lorenz Hindrichsen (Copenhagen International School)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

The Second Plague Pandemic inflicted unimaginable hurt and triggered multiple crises (demographic, spiritual, political, socio-economic), whose impact informed new artistic and literary modes of expression such as the danse macabre or the carnivalesque. 

This panel examines how writers and artists processed pandemic experiences, both in terms of actual outbreaks and long-term repercussions (such as peasant revolts or multi-generational trauma). Where do we find traces of ‘long plague’ (analogous to ‘long Covid’), and what form do they take? How do pandemic experiences affect collective memory and shared narratives? And what theoretical frameworks might be helpful for studying (post)pandemic discourse in literature and art?

Epic, History, and Philosophy in the Renaissance

updated: 
Tuesday, July 9, 2024 - 4:02pm
Renaissance Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2024

Several prominent accounts of the end of epic attribute its demise to modernity. A society riven by contradictions cannot make epic poems. The incoherence of modernity baffles the grand aspirations of epic to tell the “tale of the tribe,” to compass an entire world and way of life in a single grand vision. That is one story of the end of epic in Western literature. The rise of natural philosophy, the disenchantment of the world and banishment of God to the gaps left by naturalistic accounts broke up the enchanted world that created epics, leaving in its wake elegiac mourning for the totality epic represented.

Medieval Practices of Adaptation (ICMS 2025)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 9, 2024 - 11:40am
Amber Dunai
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

At no time has intellectual culture been more committed to the notion of prior “authority” than in the Middle Ages.  Yet medieval adaptations of earlier works and media objects, including classical and scriptural writings, are often boldly inventive: a paradox due for serious consideration.  Existing contributions to Adaptation Studies nearly always focus on post-medieval adaptation (such as modern adaptations of medieval sources).  In contrast, for this session we invite papers that redirect the insights of Adaptation Studies to build a more coherent sense of medieval ideas and practices of adaptation, especially in cases involving radical or unintuitive changes of language, medium, genre, style, context, or audience.

Palgrave Studies in Global Literatures and Religions (book series)

updated: 
Monday, July 8, 2024 - 4:20pm
Palgrave Studies in Global Literatures an Religions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 3, 2025

Palgrave Studies in Global Literatures and Religions Series

Series Editor: Heather Ostman

 

The Palgrave Studies in Global Literatures and Religion Series invites book proposals for essay collections or monographs that align with the Series’s intention:

 

ICMS 2025: Exploring Complaint in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period - Traditions and Transformations of Complaint

updated: 
Monday, July 8, 2024 - 4:03pm
Krista Telford (UNC Chapel Hill) & Mounawar Abbouchi (UGA) | International Congress on Medieval Studies 2025
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

Complaint is as easy to identify in medieval and early modern literature as it is challenging to define. One need not look far in premodern literature to find a figure railing against Fortune, a forsaken woman grieving her loss, or a character critiquing the injustices of society in mournful, sometimes bitter, tones. A polymorphous literary form, complaint can function as satire, prayer, and elegy; yet it is also a distinct form, sometimes described as a mode or a genre.Though complaint is inextricably linked to grief, the role it plays in grief management has been shown to vary greatly, sometimes working to temper or mobilize a character’s grief and at other times paradoxically multiplying it.

SRC Call For Papers

updated: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2024 - 11:06am
Southeastern Renaissance Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 21, 2024

The Southeastern Renaissance Conference cordially invites you to the 2024 Conference to be held at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina from Friday, September 20-Saturday, September 21.

The conference theme this year is open to any topic related to the Renaissance/ Early Modern period.

The plenary speaker will be Steven May of Emory University.

How to Submit

Please submit your full essay (20-minute reading time maximum, or no more than 2,500 words) to the submission module on the SCRC website, southeasternrenaissance.org, including your email somewhere on the document so we may contact you with our decision.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2025: Expanding Perspectives on Hoccleve and Gender

updated: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2024 - 11:06am
International Hoccleve Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

Expanding Perspectives on Hoccleve and Gender

A Session of Papers at the 2025 International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, sponsored by the International Hoccleve Society

In his notoriously laddish introduction to The Minor Poems,Frederick Furnivall wishes that Thomas Hoccleve had been “a manlier fellow.” Furnivall’s judgment reflects straitened Victorian gender norms that have little to do with medieval reality. But Hoccleve’s relationship to masculinity, femininity, and the gender politics of his own era remains an open question in criticism.

Overtones Ege Journal of Engilsh Studies Vol. 4 (2025)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2024 - 11:06am
Ege University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

OVERTONES EGE JOURNAL OF ENGLISH STUDIES

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

            Annual deadline: September 15

The 15th Biennial Conference of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2024 - 11:03am
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 31, 2025

Robin Hood and Other Social Bandits in Folk and Popular Culture

HYBRID

15th Biennial Conference of

the International Association for Robin Hood Studies

26-27 June 2025

The Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

(and ONLINE),

co-organized by the University of Silesia

J.R.R. Tolkien & Children’s Literature

updated: 
Saturday, June 29, 2024 - 8:17pm
Children's Literature Association Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2024

CFP: J.R.R. Tolkien & Children’s Lit 

A Special Issue of Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 

Joseph T. Thomas, Jr., Guest Editor 

San Diego State University 

 

The deadline for submissions to this special issue is September 15, 2024. 

Special Issue on "Borders / Crossing in medieval English literature, language, and culture"

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2024 - 2:08pm
ÉTUDES MÉDIÉVALES ANGLAISES
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2024

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue of EMA (Etudes Médiévales Anglaises) on the theme
"Borders / Crossing in medieval English literature, language, and culture." 

The notions of borders and crossing, and the articulation between them, can be conceived in many ways. Borders, whether natural or arbitrary, sealed or porous, fixed or mobile, as limits or confines, spatial or temporal, can be seen as an obstacle or a wall. They are also a challenge to be taken up and overcome (expansion, threshold to a new era), hence the notion of crossing (movement, transfer, transformation). As delimitations, borders help to constitute an identity which refers to the outside as otherness. 

CfP: Time after Time: On Cruising the Past, a special issue of GLQ

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2024 - 3:30pm
GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2024

Call for Papers

“Time after Time: On Cruising the Past,” a special issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies

Co-Editors: Adrián Emmanuel Hernández-Acosta (Yale University) and Kris Trujillo (University of Chicago)

CfP: Connections, Interconnections and Disconnections Pt2

updated: 
Thursday, June 6, 2024 - 12:59pm
Festival Culture Research and Education
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2024

Call for Journal Articles Now Open

Every year after our symposium, we invite authors to submit papers for consideration for publication. 

We are now inviting submissions for part two of the theme 'connections, interconnections, and disconnections'. To be published in Volume 3 of the Journal of Festival Culture Inquiry and Analysis by the end of 2024, 

Whether ancient or modern, we continue to examine festival culture around the world. Papers should explore how these connections, interconnections, and disconnections may shape and influence cultural practices, traditions, and norms.

 

Jubilee!

updated: 
Sunday, June 2, 2024 - 7:18pm
Sewanee Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2024

It's our 50th birthday, and we're having a party!

Please join us Feb 28th-Mar 1st, 2025 for a very special Sewanee Medieval Colloquium. This year’s conference theme is intended to be as capacious as possible to encourage previous presenters, respondents, and plenaries to return to the Colloquium to celebrate what lies ahead for Medieval Studies. The meeting is intended to celebrate the ways in which the conference has fostered conversations between established scholars and new voices in the field. To this end, we hope to create as many panels as possible that pair former attendees with new, emerging scholars as we think about the future of the discipline.

'Who Owns Shakespeare?' - Shakespeare's Globe

updated: 
Thursday, May 23, 2024 - 2:29pm
Shakespeare's Globe, London
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 26, 2024

As part of the forthcoming Shakespeare and Race Festival at Shakespeare’s Globe, we are delighted to announce a two-day symposium to be held in London on 25-26 October 2024.  

Our festival theme is ‘Who Owns Shakespeare?’ and aims to examine the contested space that Shakespeare occupies in the world of theatre, academia and the public sphere.

We are inviting paper submissions for individual 45-minute sessions, which includes time for audience Q&A, engaging with the conference theme: ‘Who Owns Shakespeare?: Adaptation, Appropriation, Authority’.

 

Topics may include (but are not limited to) the following: 

 

Adaptation, appropriation, translation

Early modern and modern-day performance 

RSA 2025: Laboring writers in the early modern world

updated: 
Thursday, May 23, 2024 - 2:26pm
N/A
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2024

We are seeking papers for a panel at RSA 2025 in Boston that address laboring writers--not so much writing as labor, but writers whose primary identity is as a laborer, peasant, artisan, or craftsperson from any geographic region. Such writers are often neglected in favor of courtiers and their clients. Indeed, some of how we conceive of “the literary” today is informed by the tastes of the ruling elite of the early modern period. This panel thus aims to recover non-elite voices of the past.

CFP Medieval Comics Team-Up: The Values of Comics for Medieval Studies (6/1/2024; Medieval Academy of America - Cambridge, MA 3/20-22/2025)

updated: 
Monday, May 20, 2024 - 1:47pm
Michael A. Torregrossa, Medieval Comics Project
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 1, 2024

Medieval Comics Team-Up: The Values of Comics for Medieval Studies

Session proposed for The Medieval Academy at 100: The 2025 Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America (Harvard University, Cambridge MA, from 20-22 March 2025)

Sponsored by Medieval Comics Project, an outreach effort of the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture

Organized by Michael A. Torregrossa

Paper Proposals due 1 June 2024

 

Addressing Difficult Aspects of the Medieval

updated: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2024 - 3:26pm
Grace O'Duffy
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 9, 2024

We are thrilled to invite abstracts for our workshop, ADAM: 'Addressing Difficult Aspects of the Medieval', which is designed for postgraduates and Early Career Researchers and which will take place at St John's College, Oxford from the 23rd-24th September, 2024.

The inaugural ADAM workshop will bring together medievalists of all disciplines to discuss the research and teaching of ‘difficult’ or ‘taboo’ topics. We welcome applications from scholars working in any field that demands sensitivity and resilience from researchers, such as (but not limited to): gender, sexual violence, mental health, disability, and race. 

Middle English Literature, including Chaucer (at PAMLA, November 2024)

updated: 
Monday, May 13, 2024 - 2:33pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2024

The 121st Annual Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference, Palm Springs, California, USA, Nov. 7-10, 2024

The Middle English Literature including Chaucer session at the 2024 conference of PAMLA (Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association) is open to all papers that explore some aspect of Middle English poetry, prose, and/or Chaucerian studies. 

Call for Papers: The Pagan Beowulf: Alternatives to the Usual Beowulf

updated: 
Monday, April 29, 2024 - 1:55pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2024

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA) 77th Annual Convention

October 10-12 (Thur.-Sat.) at the Westgate Resort, Las Vegas, Nevada

Deadline for Submissions: June 30, 2024

Odin asked, “Can you Read the Runes?” How to Read the Runic Letters in Part I of Beowulf

updated: 
Monday, April 29, 2024 - 1:55pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2024

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA) 77th Annual Convention

October 10-12 (Thur.-Sat.) at the Westgate Resort, Las Vegas, Nevada

Join us in Las Vegas this October, where we will defy the odds and time, and you can learn how to read some of the 418 (and counting) letter runes found in the first third of Beowulf.

This groundbreaking, ninety-minute session is the first of its kind in teaching how one can detect and decipher between two alphabets that use the same letters, with one being just a letter and the other being a letter that represents a word. Unlike Odin, you will not have to give up an eye.

All attendees will receive a letter rune chart.

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