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Editing the Future of the Middle Ages: Some Speculative Emendations

updated: 
Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 4:34pm
full name / name of organization: 
The Medieval Colloquium at The University of Virginia
contact email: 

Emendation has become a dirty word in the study of medieval texts. Especially when modified by "speculative." Best Text editors following on the work of Joseph Bédier reject virtually all emendation as ahistorical and despite a century of advances in textual criticism, the extended controversies regarding George T. Kane and E. Talbot Donaldson's editions of Piers Plowman bear witness to the persistent unease brought on by "speculation." This panel invites papers that rethink the nature of emendation in the broadest terms. We hope that papers will use a historical crux--be it textual, bibliographic or hermeneutic--to think about wider issues relating to the future of the study of medieval culture.

SURVIVAL: University of Toronto Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature, March 12-March 15, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 3:05pm
full name / name of organization: 
Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Keynote Addresses: Professor Christopher Fynsk (University of Aberdeen) and Professor Elizabeth Rottenberg (DePaul University)

Linda Hutcheon and J. Edward Chamberlin Lecture in Literary Theory: Professor Eric Cazdyn (University of Toronto)

Call for Blog Contributors - Genre and Medievalism - Open-ended

updated: 
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 7:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
Tales After Tolkien Society

The Tales After Tolkien Society promotes scholarship exploring any and all ways in which popular culture genres engage with the Middle Ages. What does 'medieval' mean in different genres – including but limited to Fantasy, Science Fiction, Romance, Westerns, Historical, Horror, Young Adult and Children's?

The Society aims to connect scholars and build a community of those working on medievalisms in genre literature, and to promote their work. We organize conference panels, and have two edited collections forthcoming.

Chaucer and Italian Poetics (NEMLA 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 4:12pm
full name / name of organization: 
NEMLA

Chaucer and Italian Poetics
One of the first English readers of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, Chaucer did more than translate the poetry of his Italian predecessors: he interpreted and transformed what he read. Chaucer's encounter with Italian literature shaped his conception of vernacular authorship and the construction of a literary tradition. This panel seeks papers focusing on the interaction between Chaucer and his Italian sources. A wide range of critical approaches to the theory and practice of interpreting intertextual relationships are especially welcome.

Chairs: Kara Gaston, Leah Schwebel

Area: British

NEMLA 2015: Chaucer and Italian Poetics

updated: 
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 3:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
NEMLA

Chaucer and Italian Poetics

One of the first English readers of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, Chaucer did more than translate the poetry of his Italian predecessors: he interpreted and transformed what he read. Chaucer's encounter with Italian literature shaped his conception of vernacular authorship and the construction of a literary tradition. This panel seeks papers focusing on the interaction between Chaucer and his Italian sources. A wide range of critical approaches to the theory and practice of interpreting intertextual relationships are especially welcome.

Chairs: Kara Gaston, Leah Schwebel

Please submit an abstract using this link:

Accessus: A Journal of Premodern Literature and New Media

updated: 
Monday, August 4, 2014 - 3:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
Eve Salisbury/Georgiana Donavin / The Gower Project
contact email: 

Accessus: A Journal of Premodern Literature and New Media invites submissions on topics pertaining to premodern literature, new media, and the poetry of John Gower. See scholarworks.wmich.edu/accessus for more information.

Gower and Medicine, Kalamazoo ICMS, May 14-17, 2015

updated: 
Monday, August 4, 2014 - 3:40pm
full name / name of organization: 
Eve Salisbury / The Gower Project
contact email: 

Presenters may focus on one or more of Gower's works in conjunction with the medical treatises, herbals, lapidaries, encyclopedias, health books, and other relevant materials in order to address the poet's deployment of metaphors of illness and healing, blindness, auditory impairment, diseases of the mouth, heart, brain, psychological-physiological disjunctions, traumatic injuries, and the effects of pain on the human body as well as the body of poetry that speaks on its behalf.

Cross Cultural Charlemagne in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Monday, August 4, 2014 - 3:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jace Stuckey Marymount University
contact email: 

Cross Cultural Charlemagne in the Middle Ages

This proposed collection of essays focuses on the figure of Charlemagne in diverse media throughout the Middle Ages, from the time of his life to his afterlives in art, history, law, literature, and myth throughout the medieval period.

14-15 May 2015

updated: 
Monday, August 4, 2014 - 9:06am
full name / name of organization: 
International Conference on Language, Literature, and Culture B/Orders Unbound: Transgressing the Limit in Arts and Humanities

SULEYMAN DEMIREL UNIVERSITY
(TURKEY)
in collaboration with
CANKAYA UNIVERSITY (TURKEY)

International Conference on Language, Literature, and Culture
B/Orders Unbound: Transgressing the Limit in Arts and Humanities

14-15 May 2015
Isparta, Turkey

Monstrous Women in the Middle Ages at TEMA Oct 3-4, 2014 [deadline for submission Sept 1]

updated: 
Saturday, August 2, 2014 - 9:23am
full name / name of organization: 
MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology Through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application)

In Nomadic Subjects (1994), Rosi Braidotti wrote: "Woman, as sign of difference, is monstrous." In the medieval world, a similar notion was explored in multiple medieval cultures by works—visual, verbal, and performative—that assert the exceptionality of female bodies, communities, and practices against a male norm. In line with this year's Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) theme "Interdisciplinarity in the Age of Relevance," MEARCSTAPA invites papers that focus upon the instances in which women are presented as either literal or figurative monsters, as found in images or texts from medieval Europe and contiguous cultures in Africa and Asia.

Word Hoard Issue 4: "Word of Mouth"

updated: 
Friday, August 1, 2014 - 3:47pm
full name / name of organization: 
Word Hoard (Western University)

Viva voce—"with living voice," but also (and more commonly) the phenomenon of "word of mouth." When incidents of speech, song, or shouting take place, it is the mouth that transforms private impulse into audible sound. Articulatory phonetics tells us that this physiological transubstantiation is little more than the aerodynamic energy of breath rendered into sound waves, or acoustic energy. Yet when do words become more than translations, and mouths more than translating machines?

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