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CFP Brazilian Journal Aletria 26.2 Networks and Flows in Literatures in English

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2015 - 5:50pm
UFMG, PósLit

This issue aims to elicit discussions about the literary and cultural productions that have emerged from the process of colonization and post-colonial experience in English-speaking countries, as well as the expansion of these historical experiences through cross-cultural dialogues. It is, therefore, the investigation of the transits of literary, artistic, and cultural repertoires in English, aiming to comprehend the networks and flows of critical or theoretical references about these productions in the various stages of the colonization and post-colonial period.

Mocking Bird Technologies: the Poetics of Parroting, Mimicry, and Other Starling Tropes

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2015 - 3:10pm
Chris GoGwilt and Melanie Holm

Mocking Bird Technologies: the Poetics of Parroting, Mimicry, and Other Starling Tropes

Editors: Melanie Holm (holm.melanie@gmail.com) & Chris GoGwilt (gogwilt@fordham.edu)

Call for papers:
We invite essays (of no more than 9,500 words) that address any aspect of "mocking bird technologies," with a special emphasis on tracking the elusive history and poetics of the "starling" trope within a global and comparative context.

Edited Collection / Rethinking Globalization and Spatial Scale [Abstracts: May 29, 2015]

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2015 - 12:04pm
NC State University

We are seeking essays for an edited collection titled Rethinking Globalization and Spatial Scale. The goal of the volume is to bring together interdisciplinary research on globalization spanning the humanities and social sciences that foregrounds theoretical and methodological conceptualizations of scale—how people, capital, goods, material infrastructure, ideas, and power aggregate along or slide among different degrees or levels of attachment, from personal to local to national to transnational.

Queerness and Animality

updated: 
Saturday, April 4, 2015 - 6:32pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Queerness and Animality
PAMLA 2015, November 6-8 2015
Portland, Oregon

Presiding Officer:
Mackenzie Gregg, University of California, Riverside

[UPDATE] ASLE Panel at MMLA 2015 - Proposals by 4/15

updated: 
Friday, April 3, 2015 - 10:33am
Midwest Modern Language Association / Associaton for the Study of Literature and the Environment

Just over a decade ago, Dana Phillips (in)famously attacked ecocritics for uncritically borrowing terms and ideas from the discipline of ecology, which, he argued, is itself a "less than fully coherent field with a very checked past and fairly uncertain future." While controversial, Phillips's critique sparked important discussions about ecocriticism's methodology, especially its claim to interdisciplinarity. So-called "second wave" ecocritics reexamined the field's founding assumptions; a period of self-assessment propelled ecocriticism toward a more rigorous engagement with the sciences as well as the humanities.

The Sacred and the Sublime (4-6 May, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, April 3, 2015 - 7:07am
DEUAS- Dokuz Eylül University American Studies Symposium

Visit our webpage: http://deuas.deu.edu.tr/

Dokuz Eylül University – Department of American Culture and Literature

1st INTERNATIONAL AMERICAN STUDIES SYMPOSIUM

May 4-5-6, 2016 – Izmir, TURKEY

The Sacred

and

the Sublime

This symposium will bring together academics from across Turkey and the rest of the world to discuss the idea of the "The Sacred and the Sublime"

Arthurian Mythos: Well of Inspiration

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 3:45pm
Mythopoeic Society

The rich and varied Arthurian Mythos has provided inspiration for countless authors over centuries, including the Inklings. Each individual picks and chooses certain parts of that Mythos, and interprets it according to personal inclination, cultural, and chronological biases. Consider, for example: the varied and often contradictory ways the characters are interpreted; aspects of Arthuriana most studied or most ignored; historical background; its place in legend and myth. We also welcome papers focusing on other work and interests of the Inklings (especially J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Charles Williams), of our Guests of Honor Jo Walton and John Rateliff), and other fantasy authors and themes.

[UPDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED: APRIL 5: MMLA 2015: Animals in Literature and Film

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 2:40pm
Julia Dauer, MIdwest Modern Language Association

This year's MMLA Animals in Literature and Film panel invites papers engaging this year's conference theme "Arts and Sciences," and especially the connection between the history of science and animals.

Papers might consider eighteenth- or nineteenth-century natural history writing and/or collection practices; contemporary or historical discourse around animal experimentation; conceptual issues of animacy, animality, and/or "life"; taxidermy; issues of animality or personhood in contemporary science, medicine, literature, or film; issues of extinction and/or species revival; or figures of "monstrous animals" produced by science, from Frankenstein to Godzilla to the dinosaurs reanimated to populate Jurassic Park.

Old and Middle English Permanent Section MMLA, Columbus, OH, November 12-15, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 1:56pm
Midwest Modern Language Association

While the Middle Ages are not always though of as a time rich in developments in the arts and sciences, as scholars of medieval literature, we know that this is not the case. Certainly, old and middle English literature can be thought of as an art form itself, and manuscript art and illumination can also be considered as art. Additionally, discussions of arts and sciences within texts themselves (both literary and religious) are plentiful and wildly interesting throughout the Middle Ages.

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