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The Griselda Story: Feminist Perspectives

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:53pm
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies - Kalamazoo 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo 2017: Special Session

The Griselda Story: Feminist Perspectives

Hunting for the Animal Subject in Anglo-Saxon England: a Roundtable (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:54pm
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies - Kalamazoo, MI - May 11-14, 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

A recent trend in medieval studies and the humanities at large has been a “turn” to the animal. While medievalists have long been interested in bestiaries, beast epics, and other texts populated with nonhumans, the research that is produced is inevitably concerned with what those works say about human culture rather than what they can reveal about perceptions of animals as animals. The field of animal studies (alternatively known as critical animal theory), in contrast, focuses on how humans have sought to differentiate themselves from nonhuman animals and how this perceived seperation has determined the human treatment of and responses to nonhumans.

Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, International Medieval Congress at Leeds

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:27pm
Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the significant roles played by medieval women as patrons of architecture and to the ways in which gender informed the design and function of architectural sites. But what about representations of women and architecture in the medieval imagination? How do visual materials such as manuscript illuminations, paintings and tapestries, and literary works, such as dream visions, conceptualize the relationship between women and architectural space? To what degree are gender and architecture mutually constituted? What conclusions can we draw about spaces considered feminine, and how do these spaces renegotiate the divisions between private and public?

International Hoccleve Society at Kalamazoo 2017: Teaching Hoccleve (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 11:14pm
International Hoccleve Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

There is a subtle irony in the fact that Thomas Hoccleve, whose corpus of early fifteenth-century poems is saturated with the concepts of recovery and rehabilitation, has been at the center of a decades-long process of poetic and pedagogic rehabilitation in university English departments. No longer brushed aside as a mere epigone of Geoffrey Chaucer, the traditional nucleus of Medieval English literature syllabi, Hoccleve now claims a legitimate place in the late medieval canon.  But what is that place exactly, as far as college classrooms go?

International Hoccleve Society at Kalamazoo 2017: Hoccleve at Play

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 11:13pm
International Hoccleve Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since Thomas Hoccleve chose to set his “Compleinte,” the opening salvo of his five-poem Series, in the “broun sesoun of Mihelmesse” (an intentional inversion of Chaucer’s springtime “Aprill shoures”), critics of his poetry have been immersed in the depressive and disconsolate overtones of much of his verse. Hoccleve makes this easy—he dwells on his misspent youth and the infirmities of old age, bodily and financial.  Malcolm Richardson’s decades-old evaluation of Hoccleve as an “unfortunate poet,” a “slacker” and “failed bureaucrat” remains alive in much current scholarship which scours Hoccleve’s self-admitted defeats and disappointments for evidence of his commentary on fifteenth-century English politics and identity-politics.

Reconsidering The Second Nun's Tale (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:28pm
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies - Kalamazoo, MI - May 11-14, 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

CFP: Reconsidering The Second Nun’s Tale
International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 11-14, 2017) in Kalamazoo, MI

Updated: Due October 1: PCA San Diego April 2017: Medievalism in Popular Culture

updated: 
Monday, September 26, 2016 - 10:39am
Christina Francis/PCA Medievalism Area Chair
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

PCA/ACA 2017 National Conference: April 12 – 15, 2017 – San Diego, California

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods.  These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc.   For this year’s conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

International Pearl-Poet Society CFP IMCS-Kalamazoo 2017

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 1:28pm
The International Pearl-Poet Society
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016

The International Pearl-Poet Society is sponsoring the following two paper sessions at the 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 11-14, 2017) at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI:

I: Death and Rebirth in the Pearl-Poet
II: The Transformative Pearl-Poet: Translation and Adaptation

Staging the Undead

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:24am
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

"Staging the Undead"

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