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[UPDATE] CSU LOS ANGELES SIGNIFICATIONS MAY 3, 2014

updated: 
Monday, February 24, 2014 - 7:32pm
CSU Los Angeles/English Graduate Student Association

Significations - CSULA Department of English Graduate Student Conference - May 3, 2014
Deadline for Submissions: March 3

452ºF CFP: The history of theory and its Hispanic uses

updated: 
Monday, February 24, 2014 - 4:08pm
452°F Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature

On January 31st 2014, we start the CFP for the twelfth issue of the 452°F Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature (www.452f.com), to be published on January 31st 2015. This CFP is open and addressed to anyone who wishes to contribute and who holds at least a BA degree.
The criteria below regulate the reception and publication of articles and are subject to the content of the Peer-review System, the Style-sheet and the Legal Notice. These can be consulted in the Procedures area of the web page.
- The deadline for submissions is July 31, 2014; all articles received after this date will be rejected.

Narration and Reflection

updated: 
Monday, February 24, 2014 - 3:15pm
Christy Wampole / Compar(a)ison: An International Journal of Comparative Literature

CALL FOR PAPERS: DEADLINE MARCH 7, 2014

Compar(a)ison: An International Journal of Comparative Literature

A special issue on Narration and Reflection

guest edited by:
Stefano Ercolino (Freie Universität Berlin) and Christy Wampole (Princeton University)

In this special issue of Compar(a)ison, we seek to investigate the challenging relationship between narration and reflection, which seems to require thought and narrative to conform, respectively, to both the heuristic and rhetorical potential and strictures of mimesis and thinking. We invite contributions pertaining to literature and the visual arts. Possible lines of inquiry include:

13th International Connotations Symposium - Poetic Justice: Legal, Ethical, and Aesthetic Judgments in Literary Texts

updated: 
Monday, February 24, 2014 - 9:15am
Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate

The first textbook definition of the concept of poetic justice goes back to Thomas Rymer's The Tragedies of the Last Age Consider'd (1678). According to him, the term signified "the distribution, at the end of a literary work, of earthly rewards and punishments in proportion to the virtue or vice of the various characters" (Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms 299-300). The introduction of virtue and vice into the concept immediately refers to a moral dimen-sion; on aesthetic grounds, however, it was soon (and has continued to be) criticized.

Forever: University of Toronto Graduate Conference, May 15-16 2014

updated: 
Monday, February 24, 2014 - 12:10am
English Graduate Conference at University of Toronto

Best friends forever; been that way forever; nothing lasts forever; forever young. 'Forever' is ubiquitous in our cultural imagination. It finds its way into statements of intimacy and commitment, as well as statements of loss; it seems applicable both to the spiritual and the mundane; likewise to the very long and the ephemeral. 'Forever' comes up in discourses of religion, in manuscript and book history, and in medieval and early modern conceptions of time.

[UPDATE] The AnaChronisT journal (4/25/2014)

updated: 
Sunday, February 23, 2014 - 1:39pm
The AnaChronisT

The AnaChronisT 18 invites research papers, interviews, and book reviews on literatures in English for its next issue, to be published in 2014. Papers are to be sent to The AnaChronisT (Department of English Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, H–1088 Budapest, Rákóczi út 5.) by Friday, 25 April 2014. Note that this is an extended deadline.

The AnaChronisT http://seas3.elte.hu/anachronist/ welcomes submissions by graduate and doctoral students as well as academics. The requirements of application are as follows:

- one hard copy of the essay sent to the above address;

Voice and Empowerment -- October 24-25, 2014

updated: 
Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 10:08am
Michigan College English Association

Call for Papers: MCEA Conference, Friday October 24, 2014, and Saturday October 25, 2014

Theme: Voice and Empowerment

Saturday Luncheon Speaker: Fiction Writer Bonnie Jo Campbell

Location: Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI

As faculty members, we try to empower our students and to encourage them to develop their own voices. We also want our students to hear the different voices of others in their classrooms and cities and in literature. Working in a culture that often has an anti-intellectual bias, how can we find our own voices and empower ourselves? We welcome scholarly papers and creative writing about the topics below.

Intertextual Memory

updated: 
Friday, February 21, 2014 - 6:44pm
MLA 2015 Special Session

Explicit reference to actual literary texts, songs, films, or art that become sites of memory within fictional works from any period. 300 word abstracts by 14 March 2014

Writing Anew: Critical, Cultural, and Canonical Innovations in Literature

updated: 
Friday, February 21, 2014 - 1:40pm
University of North Texas Graduate Students of English Association

Interpreting the act of writing as one of (re)invention and (re)constitution
equips burgeoning critics and creative writers to engage the written word along the axes of power, politics, and persuasion.

The 2014 UNT Critical Voices Conference, which will take place on March 22, 2014, invites critical and creative pieces that both celebrate
and challenge the canonical, historical, and/or political structures with which authors have interacted for centuries.

Authors may submit an abstract of 200-500 words (for
a piece of literary/cultural criticism) or an excerpt (for a creative piece to UNTCriticalVoices@gmail.com

Kings of Infinite Space?: Renaissance Literature and the Spatial Turn (October 16-19, 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 10:43pm
Sixteenth Century Society and Conference

Literary critic Robert Tally has identified what he calls a "turn to the spatial" in humanistic inquiry over the past generation. The insights of spatial theorists like Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, and Bertrand Westphal, as well as those of radical geographers like Doreen Massey, Edward Soja, David Harvey, and Yi-Fu Tuan have altered how literary critics speak about the idea of "space" in relation to literary production. The "turn to the spatial" has been particularly embraced by those who work on literature in an era of the internet and globalization in which our very understanding of how space is experienced is so radically different.

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