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Making the English Book (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:37pm
Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Making the English Book

52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017

 

Monsters II: Immaterial Monsters

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:37pm
MEARCSTAPA / Societas Daemonetica
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The recent scholarly turn towards greater consideration of the material culture of the Middle Ages paradoxically also draws attention back to the places where materiality is strikingly absent. Monsters are often seen by medieval and modern commentators as inextricably linked with their embodiment, and yet are frequently insubstantial.

Hell Studies: Hellish Remixes

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:37pm
Societas Daemonetica
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Remix Studies is a nascent but fast-growing field. Just last year Routledge published its first critical companion to Remix Studies, and interest in the field -- which critically examines the relationships of sources and analogues, as well as the production and reproduction of texts -- is steadily growing. That said, to this point very little attempt has been made to apply this theory to the study of medieval materials. This session proposes to jump-start the discourse of Remix Studies in a medieval context by providing a venue for discussion.

Medieval Equestrianism Sessions at IMC Leeds 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:52pm
Anastasija Ropa
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Special on Sessions Medieval Equestrianism at the International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds

Dates: 3-6 July 2017

 

‘It is intriguing to reflect that everyone in the Middle Ages, as a matter of course, must have been able to guess the social rank of every horse that came in sight, just as they recognized ranks of people. Horses and people intermingled everywhere, locked in a relationship that made indispensable to each other.’ (Joan Thirsk, ‘Foreword’ to Ann Hyland, The Horse in the Middle Ages)

 

The Griselda Story: Feminist Perspectives

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:53pm
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies - Kalamazoo 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo 2017: Special Session

The Griselda Story: Feminist Perspectives

Hunting for the Animal Subject in Anglo-Saxon England: a Roundtable (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:54pm
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies - Kalamazoo, MI - May 11-14, 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

A recent trend in medieval studies and the humanities at large has been a “turn” to the animal. While medievalists have long been interested in bestiaries, beast epics, and other texts populated with nonhumans, the research that is produced is inevitably concerned with what those works say about human culture rather than what they can reveal about perceptions of animals as animals. The field of animal studies (alternatively known as critical animal theory), in contrast, focuses on how humans have sought to differentiate themselves from nonhuman animals and how this perceived seperation has determined the human treatment of and responses to nonhumans.

Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, International Medieval Congress at Leeds

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:27pm
Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the significant roles played by medieval women as patrons of architecture and to the ways in which gender informed the design and function of architectural sites. But what about representations of women and architecture in the medieval imagination? How do visual materials such as manuscript illuminations, paintings and tapestries, and literary works, such as dream visions, conceptualize the relationship between women and architectural space? To what degree are gender and architecture mutually constituted? What conclusions can we draw about spaces considered feminine, and how do these spaces renegotiate the divisions between private and public?

International Hoccleve Society at Kalamazoo 2017: Teaching Hoccleve (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 11:14pm
International Hoccleve Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

There is a subtle irony in the fact that Thomas Hoccleve, whose corpus of early fifteenth-century poems is saturated with the concepts of recovery and rehabilitation, has been at the center of a decades-long process of poetic and pedagogic rehabilitation in university English departments. No longer brushed aside as a mere epigone of Geoffrey Chaucer, the traditional nucleus of Medieval English literature syllabi, Hoccleve now claims a legitimate place in the late medieval canon.  But what is that place exactly, as far as college classrooms go?

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