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CFP: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Appropriations of Medieval English Literature (9/15/2006; Kalamazoo, 5/10/07-5/13/07)

updated: 
Sunday, July 9, 2006 - 1:28pm
Erik Vorhes

The writer of Ecclesiastes laments, "Of making many books there is no
end, and much study is a weariness of the flesh." This session aims
to explore various models of appropriation of medieval English
literature. Topics include the adoption of the medieval concept of
'auctoritas'; the use of earlier texts as polemic; the adaptation of
earlier or contemporary material for satirical purposes; the
deliberate or accedintal misattribution of an author to a text; and
the material reuse of manuscript pages in bookbinding, the assembly
of leaf books, and the composition of commonplace books.

CFP: Cityscapes: Town and Country in the Medieval Imagination (UK) (7/31/06; Leeds, 7/9/07-7/12/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:14am
Malte Urban

The effect of cityscapes on the creative imagination has in recent years
become one of the countless concerns of contemporary cultural criticism, but
surprisingly little attention has been paid to the medieval roots of the
perception of urban environments. Building upon the considerable recent work
on the city in the Middle Ages, this session aims to address this critical
vacuum by bringing together papers that discuss the relationship of town and
country in the medieval imagination. Can we sustain a belief in an ultimate
and insurmountable otherness of the medieval imagination or are the medieval
and postmodern views of cityscapes in fact two sides of the same coin? I

CFP: Medieval Popular Culture (11/1/06; PCA/ACA, 4/4/07-4/7/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:14am
Leslie Fife

Medieval Popular Culture
  CALL FOR PAPERS
   
  The Medieval Popular Culture area
  of the Popular Culture Association invites
  abstracts for the next annual meeting:
   
  APRIL 4 - 7, 2007
  BOSTON, MA
  Boston Marriott Copley Place
   
  Submissions are welcome on any aspect of popular culture
  in the Middle Ages, as well as on medieval themes, motifs,
  and medievalism in modern popular culture.
   
  We are also soliciting submissions for the following panels:
   
  TEACHING ROUNDTABLE: How to use popular culture
  to teach the Middle Ages, including films, comics, novels
  and other cultural products.
   
  PROTEAN ARTHUR: Explore

CFP: John Gower in the 21st Century (UK) (7/31/06; Leeds, 7/9/07-7/12/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:13am
Malte Urban

The poetry of John Gower has experienced a renaissance of critical interest
in recent years, and scholars are beginning to realise the potential of
subjecting his works to an array of innovative approaches. This session aims
to bring together a panel assessing Gower¹s situation within 21st-century
medieval studies, and it is hoped that we can define more clearly his
position in the contemporary academy and his relation to the London culture
in which he was working, especially the relationship between his poetry and
that of his contemporaries and successors.

Possible topics include:

CFP: Questioning Colonialism (10/15/06; 2/22/07-2/24/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:12am
Merideth, Aaron James

February 22-24, 2007. Questioning Colonialism. The Sixteenth Annual Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Interdisciplinary Symposium at the University of Miami invites abstracts for papers on topics dealing with colonization and its aftermath in the Americas, Africa, the Mideast, and the Far East. Topics may include indigenous cultures and their reaction to colonization; navigation; cartography; visual and literary representations of the colonized and the colonizing; the transformation of European world views; and the effects of empire in North and South America. We welcome a variety of conceptual and methodological approaches.

CFP: The Merry Widow: Rethinking Widowhood in History, Culture, and Society (UK) (12/31/06; 7/7/07-7/9/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:12am
McAvoy E.

THE MERRY WIDOW: RETHINKING WIDOWHOOD IN HISTORY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY
=20
Papers and full sessions for a strand on medieval widowhood are =
currently
being sought for a conference hosted by the Centre for Research into =
Gender
in Culture and Society (GENCAS) at the University of Wales, Swansea =
July
7th-9th, 2007.

Keynote Speakers:=20
Veena Talwar Oldenburg, Professor of History, Baruch College, CUNY
Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly, Professor of German Literature, Exeter College,
Oxford
Dr Anneke Mulder-Bakker, Fellow in Medieval History, University of =
Leiden,
Netherlands
Susie Boyt, Novelist

CFP: Undergraduate Papers: Med-Ren (undergrad) (7/1/06; 9/14/06-9/16/06)

updated: 
Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 6:19pm
kjt9t

The University of Virginia's College at Wise, Medieval-Renaissance Conference
is pleased to announce a call for undergraduate papers for the upcoming
Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 14-16, 2006.

Papers by undergraduates covering any area of medieval and renaissance studies
are welcome. Abstracts for papers should be 250-300 words in length and
should be accompanied by a brief letter of recommendation from a faculty
sponsor.

Abstracts may be submitted electronically or by snail-mail by July 1 to:

CFP: Tolkien and the Inklings (7/1/06; 9/14/06-9/16/06)

updated: 
Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 5:27pm
kjt9t

The University of Virginia's College at Wise, Medieval-Renaissance Conference
is pleased to announce a call for a panel on JRR Tolkine and the Inklings for
the upcoming Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 14-16, 2006.

Papers covering all aspects of the works of Tolkien and his peers are welcome,
with special consideration given to papers that discuss their works in
relation to medieval and/or renaissance art, literature, and culture.
Abstracts for papers should be 250-300 words in length and may be submitted
electronically or by snail-mail by July 1 to:

CFP: The Medieval World: From the Secular to the Spiritual (10/1/06; 2/24/07)

updated: 
Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 5:27pm
Britt C Rothauser

24th Annual New England Medieval Studies Consortium Graduate Student Conference

University of Connecticut

The Medieval World: From the Secular to the Spiritual
Saturday, February 24, 2007

Plenary Speaker: James Simpson, Harvard University
Professor of English and American Literature and Language; Life Fellow, Girton College Cambridge;
Honorary Fellow, Australian Academy of the Humanities

Abstracts from graduate students are now being accepted on all topics concerning late antiquity through the late Middle Ages. We strongly encourage papers from a variety of disciplines, including:

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