Subscribe to RSS - medieval

medieval

Nineteenth-/Twentieth-/Twenty-First-Century Medievalisms

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Daniel C. Najork; Robert Sirabian
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

For this session, we seek proposals exploring the factors shaping nineteenth- and twentieth-/twenty-first-century literature (in its broad sense) about the Middle Ages as well as the differences in approaches to the Middle Ages in each century. What historical, social, and intellectual views shaped nineteenth-century approaches to the Middle Ages? In what ways were these views limited or biased based on what the Victorians knew and believed and did not know, particularly when compared to advances in historical, psychological, and political knowledge in the next centuries? Conversely, what shaped twentieth-/twenty-first-century views of the Middle Ages?

Studies in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Daniel C. Najork
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Despite the fact that, as Jonas Wellendorf has recently pointed out, “students of Old Norse literature and literary culture have long been aware that hagiographical and ecclesiastical literature has a longer written history in the North than the native saga genres,” (The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas, 48)there is still, generally, an imbalance in the critical studies of Old Norse-Icelandic hagiography in comparison to studies of the konungasögur and Íslendigasögur.

Jerusalem the Holy city

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:39pm
Stanford Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

CFP: Jerusalem the Holy City

 

The Stanford University Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) is pleased to announce that we will sponsor three sessions at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 7-10, 2020). Among these are two linked panel sessions entitled “Jerusalem: The Holy City.” The first considers medieval imaginings of a distant Jerusalem across textual, visual, and material culture, while the second considers Jerusalem as an interreligious experience among Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

 

The Ludic Outlaw: Medievalism, Games, Sport, and Play (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, September 16, 2019 - 4:15pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), Kalamazoo 2020
     

Cross-platform video games are now so popular as to constitute a financial threat to Netflix and other digital content services. One feature of many of these games is the ludic outlaw figure—found, for example, in the 2016 multiplayer Overwatch—that works to resist oppression within the game world. Because they signify popular definitions of justice and communal welfare, modern digital outlaws frequently evoke medieval outlaw representations, such as Robin Hood. In what specific ways do enduring medieval outlaw tropes function as model responses to oppression in modern games?

Environmental Violence

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:30pm
Elizabeth S. Leet, Franklin & Marshall College
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Environmental Violence

IMC Kalamazoo (May 7-10, 2020)

Organizer: Elizabeth S. Leet (eleet@fandm.edu)

Much early ecocriticism focused on natural spaces as complements to human agency. For example, studies of the hortus conclusus in medieval romance emblematize this view of nature as a fecund space mastered by humans. In our time of climate crisis, however, ecocritics seek to complicate anthropocentric views of medieval environments. By studying climates and environments that reject human dominion and endanger human lives, we may examine the violence these environments enact and evaluate the models they offer for human survival and care amidst climate disaster.

Fictionality and Belief in Middle English Writing at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:29pm
Kathryn Mogk (Harvard University)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Coleridge's famous phrase "the willing suspension of disbelief" implies that disbelief (i.e., secularity) is a pre-condition of fictionality. That argument is made explicitly in Catherine Gallagher's well-known article "The Rise of Fictionality"—but it is also often assumed in medieval studies, as fictionality is localized in secular romance and rarely considered in devotional contexts. Where do fictional writing and sincere belief meet, and how do they interact? This panel welcomes papers that investigate the relationship between fictionality and belief from any angle, but which might respond to one or several of the following questions.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020 (Roundtable): Unforthcoming Texts, Unsatisfying Encounters

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (See our other listings for additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Anglo-Saxon Speculative Fictions

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (please see our other CFPs for the additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

Pages