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[UPDATE] Reconsidering Sodomy

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 10:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Following Foucault's description of sodomy as "that utterly confused category," literary scholars like Jonathan Goldberg and Alan Bray, among others, have continued to theorize the ways in which sodomy denotes no fixed set of bodily acts, but rather persists as a mobilizable category with social, political, and juridical valences. Sodomy necessarily persists, that is, in excess of the material bodily configurations it purports to police. Even so, much prevailing scholarship nonetheless returns to anal penetration as a presumptive and primary figuration in the discourse of sodomitical, disorderly, and/or illicit sexual acts.

Medieval Equestrianism: Theory and Practice - Thematic Sessions at the 2016 Leeds International Medieval Congress

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 5:30pm
Anastasija Ropa

Medieval Equestrianism: Theory and Practice
Thematic Sessions at the 2016 Leeds International Medieval Congress
We invite paper proposals on all aspects of medieval equestrianism, for complimentary sessions highlighting:
1) theoretical approaches to medieval equestrian studies;
2) practical applications of medieval equestrian studies, whether as part of re-enactment, live demonstration or public engagement activities, as well as the application of equestrian practices to academic studies of the Middle Ages.
In addition, there will be a Making Leeds Medieval on Horseback session, to round up the findings of the previous sessions with thematic demonstrations.

UNT Critical Voices Conference

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 4:41pm
University of North Texas | Graduate Students in English Association

The University of North Texas Graduate Students in English Association (GSEA) invites submissions for its annual graduate conference, to be held on April 8-10, 2016. The GSEA welcomes submissions on a variety of topics related to literary criticism, literary theory, cultural studies, material criticism, rhetoric and composition, English pedagogy, technical communication, poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Papers/presentations should last no more than 20 minutes.

English at Play: A Conference on Language and Literature -- 11/7/15

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 4:28pm
English Graduate Organization and Sigma Tau Delta of Western Illinois University

English at Play: A Conference on Language and Literature
Date: Saturday, November 7, 2015
full name / name of organization:
English Graduate Organization and Sigma Tau Delta, Western Illinois University
contact email:
ego@wiu.edu

CFP: English at Play: A Conference on Language and Literature
The English Graduate Organization (EGO) and the Sigma Tau Delta (STD) chapter of Western Illinois University are currently seeking both individual papers and panel proposals from graduate and undergraduate students for our twelfth annual conference in Macomb, IL on Saturday, November 7, 2015.

Word Hoard Issue #5: Scum and Villainy

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 1:58pm
Word Hoard

Word Hoard is soliciting articles, essays, interviews, creative pieces, and other publishable works on the theme of "Scum and Villainy" for our fifth issue. (Please find our previous issues at http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/wordhoard). We believe both "scum" and "villainy" have social, ethical, and epistemological implications reaching far beyond literary and popular tropes, and thus far beyond the lush taxonomy of opportunistic or conniving archetypes (e.g., muggers, grifters, the debased; psychopaths, traitors, the corrupt). Characterizations of "scum" or "villainy" interest us far more than literary characters as "scum" or "villains."

Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 9:31am
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

Forgotten Books and Cultural Memory, May 27–28 2016, Abstracts due February 1, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:21am
Taipei Tech Department of English (National Taipei University of Technology)

Literary history is full of forgetting—both forced and natural. Manuscripts and books have been forgotten as a result of conquest, language changes, and politics. Other texts have been forgotten due to their physical condition: sole manuscripts are hidden away in archives, libraries burn, and paper disintegrates. Many medieval texts that are now central to the English literary canon, such as Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and the Book of Margery Kempe, were virtually unknown until the nineteenth, or even twentieth centuries. Later texts, from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, have been forgotten due to changes in taste, to their originally ephemeral nature, or to the sheer quantity of works that were published.

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