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Word Hoard Issue #5: Scum and Villainy

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 1:58pm
Word Hoard

Word Hoard is soliciting articles, essays, interviews, creative pieces, and other publishable works on the theme of "Scum and Villainy" for our fifth issue. (Please find our previous issues at http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/wordhoard). We believe both "scum" and "villainy" have social, ethical, and epistemological implications reaching far beyond literary and popular tropes, and thus far beyond the lush taxonomy of opportunistic or conniving archetypes (e.g., muggers, grifters, the debased; psychopaths, traitors, the corrupt). Characterizations of "scum" or "villainy" interest us far more than literary characters as "scum" or "villains."

Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 9:31am
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

Forgotten Books and Cultural Memory, May 27–28 2016, Abstracts due February 1, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:21am
Taipei Tech Department of English (National Taipei University of Technology)

Literary history is full of forgetting—both forced and natural. Manuscripts and books have been forgotten as a result of conquest, language changes, and politics. Other texts have been forgotten due to their physical condition: sole manuscripts are hidden away in archives, libraries burn, and paper disintegrates. Many medieval texts that are now central to the English literary canon, such as Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and the Book of Margery Kempe, were virtually unknown until the nineteenth, or even twentieth centuries. Later texts, from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, have been forgotten due to changes in taste, to their originally ephemeral nature, or to the sheer quantity of works that were published.

Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

updated: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 5:49pm
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

Editing for Form: Attending to Manuscript Realities / Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 10:37pm
Medieval and Renaissance Studies / Purdue University

This proposed session asks us to consider form in medieval and modern contexts, specifically responding to discussion taking place during Session 218 of last year's Congress, "Reconsidering Form and the Literary." There, speakers proposed that modern desires and assumptions regarding textual form influence how originals are interpreted and then presented to a modern audience, from which a discussion evolved considering the editorial and pedagogical implications of such a sentiment. As a work is moved from its manuscript context, it is inevitably transformed into a version distinct from the original and reflective of modern desires regarding form and design.

"Seeking Harbor in Our Histories: Lights in the Darkness, April 1¬2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts"

updated: 
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 7:00pm
Association for the Study of Women and Mythology

Goddess Scholarship draws on historical, ethnographic and folk sources, among others, to document and honor the sacred and mundane stories which animate the traditions and spiritual lives of our global sisters and our foremothers.

In past conferences, the innovative methodologies and scholarship of ASWM participants have served to problematize contemporary perceptions of civilization, "modernization" and "progress."

ON NEARNESS, ORDER, AND THINGS: COLLECTING AND MATERIAL CULTURE 1400 TO TODAY; April 8-9, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 3:33pm
Northrop Frye Centre and Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, University of Toronto

CALL FOR PAPERS

ON NEARNESS, ORDER, AND THINGS:
COLLECTING AND MATERIAL CULTURE 1400 TO TODAY
Top of Form

A Joint Conference Sponsored by
Northrop Frye Centre, and Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, University of Toronto

Victoria College, University of Toronto

8-9 April 2016

With support provided by the Jackman Humanities Institute 
Program for the Arts, University of Toronto,
and from Queen's University


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