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Labyrinth as Paradigm in Late Medieval and Early Modern Cultures (ACLA 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:26pm
Victor Sierra Matute

The opening session of La métaphore du labyrinthe, an interdisciplinary seminar organized by Roland Barthes during 1978 and 1979, reached two principal conclusions: first, that despite the apparent chaos always linked to its semantics, the notion of 'labyrinth' actually implies "a factor of intentional and systematic construction"; second, that the labyrinthine structures have essentially a hermeneutic function. The wear and tear of the labyrinth as a metaphoric trope drove Barthes to conclude that maybe the labyrinth is but a "pseudo" metaphor, where the letter is richer than the symbol and thus, the labyrinth would engender narratives rather than images.

Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:22pm
Keridiana Chez

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

Narratives of Forgetting and the Forgetting of Narratives - ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:29pm
Rutgers Program in Medieval Studies

Working forward from Mary Carruthers' foundational work on the construction of memory structures, this panel seeks to understand medieval priorities of what to remember and what to forget. Its central goal is to explore the ways in which people created, consumed, and destroyed memories in order to communicate information and ideas. It responds to recent work on the manipulation of memories of the past, which was often involved in defining nationhood and group identity.

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference 17th-19th August, 2016, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:40am
Romance in Medieval Britain Biennial conference

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference
17th-19th August, 2016
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

In the summer of 2016, the 15th Biennial Romance in Medieval Britain Conference will be hosted for the first time outside of the British Isles and Ireland. The Romance in Medieval Britain Conferences address the genre of Romance - understood broadly - in the multilingual literary landscape of the British Isles (and Ireland) during the Middle Ages.
The conference will feature plenary lectures by Suzanne Akbari (Toronto) and Corinne Saunders (Durham).

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

The Gender-Free Being, Kalamazoo ICMS 12-15 May 2016 SMFS Sponsored Session

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 6:20am
Dorothy Kim, Associate Professor of English at Vassar College / Phoebe C. Linton, University of Edinburgh

One of the SMFS sponsored series, this session on 'The Gender-Free Being' invites papers to consider portrayals of characters in medieval history, literature and art of any period or language that explore the extent to which an individual's identity is distinct from their socially gendered, or sexual being.

[UPDATE] Panel on Lexicography and the Classics

updated: 
Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 4:57pm
CAMWS

CFP: Panel on Lexicography and the Classics
This is a call for papers for the annual CAMWS conference to be held in Williamsburg, VA, March 16th-19th 2016. The panel aims to explore both innovative developments in the field of lexicography and the history of lexicography within the larger field of Classics. Papers on the following topics are particularly welcome:
• Innovation in electronic lexica
• Lexica and word lists of languages and dialects of the Classical period beyond Latin and Greek (e.g., Oscan, Etruscan, etc.)
• Ancient lexicography and lexicographical notes in scholia
• Medieval lexica and their reception
• Lexica of the early modern period

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