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[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

The Gender-Free Being, Kalamazoo ICMS 12-15 May 2016 SMFS Sponsored Session

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 6:20am
Dorothy Kim, Associate Professor of English at Vassar College / Phoebe C. Linton, University of Edinburgh

One of the SMFS sponsored series, this session on 'The Gender-Free Being' invites papers to consider portrayals of characters in medieval history, literature and art of any period or language that explore the extent to which an individual's identity is distinct from their socially gendered, or sexual being.

[UPDATE] Panel on Lexicography and the Classics

updated: 
Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 4:57pm
CAMWS

CFP: Panel on Lexicography and the Classics
This is a call for papers for the annual CAMWS conference to be held in Williamsburg, VA, March 16th-19th 2016. The panel aims to explore both innovative developments in the field of lexicography and the history of lexicography within the larger field of Classics. Papers on the following topics are particularly welcome:
• Innovation in electronic lexica
• Lexica and word lists of languages and dialects of the Classical period beyond Latin and Greek (e.g., Oscan, Etruscan, etc.)
• Ancient lexicography and lexicographical notes in scholia
• Medieval lexica and their reception
• Lexica of the early modern period

The Consolations of Philology - ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 3:56pm
Benjamin S.W. Barootes (McGill University)

In an academic world of competing theoretical schools, ontological objects, long views, and swerves, scholars can neglect the building blocks of the texts, histories, and languages we study; too often, we overlook the words themselves. This session will focus on individual words or phrases—their ancestries, cognates, and legacies. In so doing, we hope to bring together a diverse range of scholars who share a philological bent. The session welcomes papers from linguists, literary critics, historians,theologians, and others who wish to turn their attention to the rich worlds contained in single linguistic grains. Papers may address issues of etymology, dialect, lexicography, phonetics, textual attestations, and so on.

Fairy Tales in Society and Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 1:56pm
NEMLA

This panel session will feature the manner in which fairy tales reflect and influence values and ideals of their respective society and culture. In The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, Bruno Bettelheim emphasizes on how the fairy tale that an individual has read or listened to during childhood impacts him/her both consciously and subconsciously throughout life.

Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:43am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.

Touching Hoccleve - ICMS 2016, Kalamazoo

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 9:52am
The International Hoccleve Society

Recent work in such fields as disability studies, book history, affect studies, the history of emotions, and cultural studies has raised provocative questions about the writings of Thomas Hoccleve, the fifteenth-century Privy Seal clerk and friend of Geoffrey Chaucer. Hoccleve's autobiographical accounts of his struggles with mental illness, social disaffection, and the physical strain of writing have offered modern scholars fruitful sites for re-examining the body, its textual representations, and its affects in ways analogous to current work in these emergent interdisciplinary fields.

Call for Papers; 'The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies, International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 6:34am
Sunny Harrison

Please find below a CfP for the International Medieval Congress, University of Leed, July 2016; 'The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies'

I'm hoping to encourage an exciting, interdisciplinary discussion on the relative positions of animals and humans in medieval health and medicine.

Papers are warmly encouraged from researchers working not just in philology and medical history but any discipline touching on the intersection of animals and health in any medieval geography and chronology.

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