Subscribe to RSS - medieval

medieval

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
University of Hull

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

Science Fiction in the Middle Ages and the Middle Ages in Science Fiction -- NeMLA 2016 Panel (Hartford, CT)

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 4:13pm
Timothy S. Miller, Sarah Lawrence College (Northeast MLA)

Medieval European literature played a defining role in the development of modern fantasy fiction, and genre fantasy has already received a great deal of critical attention in the academic study of medievalism. By comparison, the complex relationship of genre science fiction to the Middle Ages has been sorely understudied, and this session will include papers that consider either or both of the topics in its title, that is, on the one hand, the appearance or influence of "the medieval," broadly conceived, in modern science fiction.

Lacunae: Noticing What Is Not There - Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 1:43pm
Canadian Society of Medievalists

The Canadian Society of Medievalists invites abstracts for 20-minute papers for its session, "Lacunae: Noticing What Is Not There", to be held at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, MI in May 2016. In doing so, we hope to delve into the productive possibilities for medievalists of paying attention to what is missing. Textual scholars may be particularly familiar with the physical problem of absent sections of text, missing leaves or illegible scripts obscured by damage or decay to the manuscript but these kinds of lacunae are not the only ones that scholars encounter.

Loving and Hating Lydgate - Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 8:04pm
Lydgate Society

In its five hundred years of reception, responses to John Lydgate's poetry have varied between extremes. Early regard for Lydgate appears in such places as Stephen Hawes' Pastime of Pleasure, where the monk is canonized alongside Chaucer and Gower and at greater length than either of the other poets. By contrast, Joseph Ritson describes Lydgate in 1802 as a "voluminous, prosaick, and driveling monk." This comment has formed a flashpoint in Lydgate studies for both those who would dismiss and those who would defend this poet. Renoir, Schirmer, Pearsall, and Patterson provide a wide-ranging sampling of these perspectives.

Lydgate as Formal Innovator - Kalamazoo 2016 sponsored session

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 8:02pm
Lydgate Society

While historicist approaches to Lydgate have played a large role in the poet's now decades-old critical recuperation, all along this recuperation has also been alert to the formal dimensions of his work and to some of the many ways these dimensions represent innovations. Studies by, for example, Maura Nolan and Claire Sponsler have fruitfully combined historical inquiry with explorations of the ramifications of form. With many in the field of literary study seeking, in a variety of ways, to return considerations of form to the center court of the field's endeavors, it is an apt moment to extend, complicate, and/or critique accounts of Lydgate as a formal innovator.

CFP: "A Feel for the Text: Affect Theory and Literary Critical Practice" (Edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:57am
Stephen Ahern

Ever since Massumi posited the autonomy of affect and Sedgwick called for us to pay more attention to the felt "texture" of experience, there has been a surge of interest across the humanities and social sciences in how we are affected by and affect our environments. Affect theorists share an interest in the contingencies of being and in a model of becoming, offering an ontology that accounts for the complexities of lived experience and that promises a space for freedom resistant to the prisonhouse of discourse, to normative ideology, to state thinking.

Pages