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Lydgate as Formal Innovator - Kalamazoo 2016 sponsored session

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 8:02pm
Lydgate Society

While historicist approaches to Lydgate have played a large role in the poet's now decades-old critical recuperation, all along this recuperation has also been alert to the formal dimensions of his work and to some of the many ways these dimensions represent innovations. Studies by, for example, Maura Nolan and Claire Sponsler have fruitfully combined historical inquiry with explorations of the ramifications of form. With many in the field of literary study seeking, in a variety of ways, to return considerations of form to the center court of the field's endeavors, it is an apt moment to extend, complicate, and/or critique accounts of Lydgate as a formal innovator.

CFP: "A Feel for the Text: Affect Theory and Literary Critical Practice" (Edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:57am
Stephen Ahern

Ever since Massumi posited the autonomy of affect and Sedgwick called for us to pay more attention to the felt "texture" of experience, there has been a surge of interest across the humanities and social sciences in how we are affected by and affect our environments. Affect theorists share an interest in the contingencies of being and in a model of becoming, offering an ontology that accounts for the complexities of lived experience and that promises a space for freedom resistant to the prisonhouse of discourse, to normative ideology, to state thinking.

2nd Annual Literature and Social Justice Graduate Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 2:48pm
Lehigh English Department Graduate Program

The Lehigh English Department's second annual Literature and Social Justice Graduate Conference will take place on Lehigh's campus in Bethlehem, PA, on March 4th-5th, 2016. We will be accepting proposals from Master's and Doctoral students on this year's conference theme, public humanities. Public humanities takes literature and social justice out of the confines of the classroom or academic publication by balancing theoretical concepts with practical actions and projects that benefit others in order to expand participation in and appreciation for the humanities.

[UPDATE] Transforming Male Devotional Practices from the Medieval to the Early Modern, 16th and 17th September 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 4:09am
The University of Huddersfield

Keynote speaker announced: Professor Anthony Bale (Birkbeck, University of London)

Extended deadline for abstracts: 20th July 2015

The extended deadline reflects the interest we have received in wider European male experience. We now welcome papers that focus on British and European devotion. This conference is co-hosted with the Universities of Reading and Liverpool Hope. It aims to explore the social, economic and spatial factors underpinning the changing way men demonstrated their commitment to God and the church(es) in a period of significant turmoil. Papers that address male devotional experience from historical, literary, gender studies and material culture perspectives are welcomed. Suggested themes include:

Logic & Letters: Reason as Literary Method, NeMLA 2016, Hartford, CT

updated: 
Monday, July 13, 2015 - 11:34pm
Miriam Diller, Rutgers University

This panel focuses on the classical through the early modern periods, and seeks to discuss some of the cognitive frameworks that are either behind, or can be translated, into reading and writing. Particular priority is given to reason and specific logical systems, from Aristotelian to Baconian (and more!). Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: reader or writer as scientist; philosophies/frameworks of reading; and logical systems as literary methodologies.

For details and abstract submission, please see the NeMLA website:
http://www.cfplist.com//nemla/Home/S/15812

The deadline is September 30, 2015.

"With Nicholas Watson: Middle Time: Past, Present, and Future" at Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 13, 2015 - 3:44pm
Harvard Department of English Medieval Colloquium

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As Carolyn Dinshaw would remind us, time is a product of multiple styles of representation. Time can be recursive (the seasons), or it can map one temporality onto another (the liturgy). It can even be imagined as moving towards its own ending (the apocalypse), either by the slow ticking of days or the rush of a visionary leap, one that moves from the time of the present to the end times.

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