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Embodied Difference: Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 10:41am
Richard H. Godden and Asa Simon Mittman


Embodied Difference: Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World, edited by Richard H. Godden and Asa Simon Mittman

Call for Papers (Initial deadline, September 1)

Volume Description
Medieval and Early Modern art and literatures are replete with images of non­normative bodies. Saints lives valorize physical challenges, fabliaux render them metaphorical, medical texts pathologize them, and marginal images make them subjects of amusement. Divergent bodies are viewed as gifts from God, markers of sin, or manifestations of medical imbalances. In many cases throughout Western history, a figure marked by what Rosemarie Garland­Thomson has termed "the extraordinary body" is labeled a "monster."

Humanism and Its Prefixes

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 10:20am
Department of Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

Humanism and its prefixes
(non-, trans-, post-, in-, a-)

October 3rd-4th, 2015

Organized by the graduate students of UC Berkeley's Department of Rhetoric
Doe Library, University of California, Berkeley

[UPDATE] Power and the Mediterranean DEADLINE EXTENDED - July 15

updated: 
Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 1:14pm
Susan Abraham/Meditopos, University of Michigan

The conference Power and the Mediterranean will be held on 13-15 November 2015 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, featuring keynote speaker Julia Clancy-Smith (University of Arizona).

MAPACA 2015 Philadelphia, PA, November 5-7, 2015

updated: 
Friday, June 19, 2015 - 12:03pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association

Call for Papers MAPACA 2015
November 5-7, 2015
Philadelphia, PA

The wealth of material found in the Middle Ages and Renaissance continues to attract modern audiences with new creative works in areas such as fiction, film, and computer games, which make use of medieval and/or early modern themes, characters, or plots. This is a call for papers or panels dealing with any aspect of medieval or Renaissance representation in popular culture. Topics for this area include, but are not limited to the following:

-Modern portrayals of any aspect of Arthurian legends or Shakespeare

-Modern versions or adaptations of any other Medieval or Renaissance writer

Darkness, Depression and Descent in Anglo-Saxon England

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 3:55pm
Ruth Wehlau

Proposals are sought for "Darkness, Depression and Descent in Anglo-Saxon England," a collection of articles that will cover the depiction of emotional or physical states associated with darkness or descent as found in vernacular literature of the Anglo-Saxon period.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice's 4th Law and Literature Conference (October 30-Nov1 2015))

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 10:56pm
The John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s 4th Law and Literature Conference

This conference considers literary renderings of labor concerns, broadly defined, to explore law.

The responsibility of the state described by Plato, the contracts written by Shakespeare's Shylock, or the works delving into the plight of modern laborers all explore the intersections between Literature and Law. This conference will explore the way that literary renderings of labor concerns, broadly defined, have responded to or have influenced the law.

The 2015 John Jay College of Criminal Justice's Law and Literature Conference is especially interested in the following areas although all submissions will be considered.

UNApocalypse: Exploring Dystopianism in Texts

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 3:35pm
University of North Alabama English Department

Call for Papers:
The University of North Alabama English Department
Announces the 7th Annual Alabama Regional Graduate Conference in English
February 26-27, 2016

UNApocalypse: Exploring Dystopianism in Texts

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