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modernist studies

Marianne Moore and the Archives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:45pm
University of Buffalo
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

"Marianne Moore and the Archives"

The University at Buffalo

will host a conference on Marianne Moore

May 22-24, 2020

Call for proposals: 

"Marianne Moore and the Archives" will focus on Moore in relation to archival collection practices, broadly understood. 

We encourage proposals drawing on research collections at the Rosenbach or on the Marianne Moore Digital Archive but also proposals on Moore's appearance in other modernist archives, in relation to networks of her friends and peers, to current theories and practices of archiving, or on Moore herself as a librarian, a collector, and a self-archivist. 

Modernist Studies, Contemporary Problems (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:47pm
Alex Jones/Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

In the past decade, modernist studies has been animated by the issue of periodization. As a concept, modernism has been projected backwards and forwards in space and time. Attempts to clarify the “when” of modernism have ultimately led modernist studies to the doorstep of contemporary. If we now have late modernism, metamodernism, and cosmodernism broaching the present, we also have arguments “against periodization” (Hayot), proposals for “literary transhistory” (Bronstein), and assertions that modernism is nothing more nor less than the “creative and expressive domain” of any modernity (Friedman). But what does it mean to propose the contemporaneity of modernism when modernism itself is being detached from time and history?

ACLA 2020: Revisions of Fascism II: Comparative Fascisms

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:22pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

****This is a CFP for the 2020 ACLA Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, March 19-22, 2020.***

In The Anatomy of Fascism, Robert Paxton reminds us that fascism has always proved difficult to define. Fascism “seemed to come from nowhere.” Though it “took on multiple and varied forms” and “exalted hatred and violence in the name of national prowess,” it still “managed to appeal to prestigious and well-educated statesmen, entrepreneurs, professionals, artists, and intellectuals.” Despite this, “everyone is” nonetheless, “sure they know what fascism is.” 

Profession and Performance: The 30th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf (University of South Dakota, Vermillion, 11–14 June 2020)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - 7:10am
The Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 1, 2020

Different Voices, Voicing Difference (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:22pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The question of the relation of language to voice traces back to Aristotle’s De interpretatione, with its definition of speech as the sign of thought, and writing the sign of speech. In Jacques Derrida’s account of this phonologocentric model, voice is the ligature of “phōnē and logos,” securing their essential proximity. But if voice is only a mediation, then, as Barbara Johnson writes, voice is no longer “self-identity but self-difference.” Paradoxically, the voice marks the singular but is itself plural, sweeping the self up into an ever-ramifying play of differentiation. As David Lawton proposes, “voice is both a signature, ‘I,’ singularity, and a clear marker of difference, ‘not I,’ multiplicity”.

Modernism and Disability Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:58am
Rafael Hernandez / American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Recent work in the field of disability studies by scholars like Ato Quayson (2007), Tobin Siebers (2010), Maren Linett (2016), and Suzannah Biernoff (2017) has considered modernism’s appropriation of disabled bodies. This seminar thus seeks to better understand the role of disability in modernist literary and visual aesthetics. In particular, we encourage papers that consider how writers and artists borrowed from, mimicked, or otherwise recast disability as uniquely modernist literary and artistic subjects. Secondly, this seminar is interested in the ways modernism was cast as disabled in varied attacks on its aesthetic projects.

CFP (REMINDER): "Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies" ACLA Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020) (Deadline: 23 September 2019)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:48am
Juan Meneses, UNC Charlotte
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

“Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies”

 

Call for Papers for ACLA 2020 Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020)

 

 

This seminar seeks papers that reflect on the analytical bridges that might exist between post- political theory and literary studies. The main question the seminar aims to answer is the following: Decades after everything was declared to be political, what are the affordances, triumphs, and pitfalls of a post-political theory of literature?

 

ACLA-Snapshots of the Past: Memory and Photography in Literature and Film (Sheraton Grand Hotel, Chicago, 3/19-3/22, 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:05am
The American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Following the success of previous ACLA seminars, “The Story of Memory: Remembering, Forgetting, and Unreliable Narrators” and “The Story of Remembrance: The Future of Memory and Memories of the Future” in 2018 & 2019, this seminar invites paper proposals to discuss the relationship between memory and photography and its representation in literature and film.

 

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