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Oklahoma State English Conference: Transforming Words, March 4-5 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 9:40pm
English Graduate Student Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference. The theme of this year's conference is "Transforming Words." In his 1969 work, The Way to Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday asserts, "We have all been changed by words; we have been hurt, delighted, puzzled, filled with wonder." During the conference, we would like to explore the practical ways language functions to effect change. How can language overcome supposed barriers of race and gender?

UPDATE: (Deadline October 31) Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture (March 31-April 2, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 5:12pm
Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

The deadline is fast approaching to submit your proposals for the 10th annual Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture by the October 31st deadline. This year's theme is North and South: Constructing and/or Crossing the Cultural, Geo-Political or Metaphorical Divide.

There have been lots of new updates and plans made for this year's conference, including: keynote speakers Dr. Gerald Graft and Dr. Cathy Birkenstein, a night at the renowned music venue the Blue Moon Saloon included in your registration, an authentic cajun dinner at Randol's, and, of course, special guest Speaker Sandra Cisneros, author of "The House on Mango Street".

Apocalypse Literature Panel, American Literature Association (May 26-29, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 1:17pm
Amanda Wicks, Department of English at Louisiana State University

Apocalypse, post-apocalypse, atomic and nuclear narratives have increasingly shifted from the science fiction genre to pervade American literature as a whole. Authors such as Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy, among others, consider historical or imagined catastrophes that usher in new sensibilities, while simultaneously shattering connections to the past. Traditionally, apocalypse narratives attempt to assert order and coherence where none previously existed. Does apocalypse literature still presume control over disaster? What has apocalypse literature come to signify in the U.S.? What does apocalypse literature offer? How have imagined or real endings come to be portrayed in American literature?

[UPDATE] Samuel Beckett: Out of the Archive - International Conference, June 23-26, 2011

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 10:29am
www.outofthearchive.com University of York, UK

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Samuel Beckett: Out of the Archive
Following the large response to our first call for papers, we are pleased to announce a second round for the submission of abstracts. Slots available for speakers are limited. Details of registration will be available at www.outofthearchive.com soon. Please note that places are available for non-speaking delegates; e-mail us at Beckett.outofthearchive@gmail.com

CORRECTION--Natures 2011 [12/3/10;2/18/2011]

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 8:37am
Please note conference to be held on February 18 (not 28), 2011

Please see rest of prior posting for correct information. Only the conference date was mistakingly listed as February 28, when it fact the conference will take place on February 18, 2011 at La Sierra University in Riverside, CA. Apologies for the confusion.

Textual Intervention and the Literary Subject [ACLA March 31 - April 3, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, October 23, 2010 - 2:58pm
American Comparative Literature Association

This seminar asks questions about the myriad ways that literary agency is mediated, complicated, and enriched by forces external to the author function. As scholars concerned with the material production of texts often point out, the literature we read is often shaped and transformed by the work of editors, publishers, amanuenses, illustrators, scribes, translators, compilers, and so on. All of these laborers operating between the inaugural author and the reader substantially transform both texts and readers' experiences of these texts. But how, this seminar asks, does this substantial field of labor inform our understanding of the subjects involved in the production of literarature?

pacificREVIEW- San Diego State University's Annual Literary Journal.

updated: 
Friday, October 22, 2010 - 8:54pm
pacificREVIEW - SDSU

pacificREVIEW, a West Coast Arts Review Literary Annual published by San Diego State University students in conjunction with San Diego State University Press, is currently accepting submissions for the 2010-2011 issue entitled "Revolt."

[UDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED for Thinking Gender Conference

updated: 
Friday, October 22, 2010 - 8:12pm
Thinking Gender 21st Annual Graduate Student Research Conference

Call for Papers: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO THURSDAY OCTOBER 28th, 2010

UCLA CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WOMEN announces

Thinking Gender 2011
21st Annual Graduate Student Research Conference

Thinking Gender is a public conference highlighting graduate student research on women, gender and sexuality across all disciplines and historical periods. We invite submissions for individual papers or pre-constituted panels on any topic pertaining to women, gender, and/or sexuality. This year, among other topics, we welcome papers addressing women, gender and sexuality in relation to food, money, the academy and "female troubles" (menopause, PMS, female sexual dysfunction, the medicalization of sex).

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