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modernist studies

CFP: Children in Film

updated: 
Sunday, August 15, 2010 - 4:36pm
SWTXPCA/ACA Joint Conference April 20-23, 2011

Proposals are now being accepted for the Children in Film Area of the 31st annual PCA/ACA & SWTX PCA/ACA joint conference April 20-23, 2011, in San Antonio, TX.(www.swtxpca.org). Proposals are sought that explore and interrogate the representations of children in Hollywood film, independent film, foreign film and/or children's film.

42nd College English Association Conference: March 31 - April 2, 2011, St. Petersburg, Florida

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 10:42pm
College English Association

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida

"Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am good-fortune."
-- Walt Whitman, "Song of the Open Road"

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at www.cea-web.org

Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal.

[UPDATE] Prove It On Me: Ambivalent Lesbian Representation in the Harlem Renaissance (30 Sept. 2010, NEMLA 7-10 Apr. 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 5:46pm
Phillip Zapkin / NEMLA

The Harlem Renaissance tried to fill socially-constructed absences in African-Americans' group identity (such as humanity, art, masculinity, morality) by creating a respectable black middle class. Bourgeois imperatives complicated middle class queer existence by enforcing heteronormativity, in contrast to working class Harlem's more open relationship to sexual expression. This panel explores representations, direct or ambivalent, of African-American lesbian desire and resistance in the arts, music, and literature of the Harlem Renaissance and the contemporary queer renaissance.

Edited Collection: Vibratory Modernism (abstract deadline 10/1/2010)

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 8:46am
Anthony Enns, Department of English, Dalhousie University

Vibrations played a central role in nineteenth-century science, as light, heat, energy, and matter were all gradually understood to be essentially vibratory. This new understanding of the universe as being purely composed of vibrations had a tremendous impact on all aspects of the arts in the first half of the twentieth century, as they introduced new aesthetic possibilities that promised to transform the way art was made and viewed. In the visual arts, for example, movements like Futurism and Vorticism conceived of invisible fields of energy that could be tapped into to create new forms of art.

Nineteenth Century British Literature - October 30 Deadline

updated: 
Friday, August 13, 2010 - 6:21pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Volume 2, Issue 2

The peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Literary Journal is now accepting essays, book reviews, short stories, poetry and interviews from academics across the world for our fourth issue of the Pennsylvania Literary Journal, "Nineteenth Century British Literature," which will be published in January 2011 with Amazon CreateSpace. The page size is 8.5 X 5.5 inches, 12-point font, Times New Roman, MLA-style end-notes and Works Cited listings. The third issue of PLJ, "New and Old Historical Perspectives on Literature," is now on sale through Amazon, CreateSpace and other distribution channels.

Journal Call for submissions: Deadline 1/2/10

updated: 
Friday, August 13, 2010 - 12:30pm
Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Cultural Diversity

Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Cultural Diversity, a national journal published by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and the Frederick Douglass Institute Collaborative, welcomes the submission of academic essays from any discipline, poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, book reviews and original artwork (we print in black and white) that explore cultural diversity issues for our Spring 2011 issue. The deadline for this "general topic" issue is December 1, 2010. See our website at http://organizations.bloomu.edu/connect/ for more information about the journal and for recent issues.

Poetic Devices & Narrative Dynamics: Call For Panel Submissions

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 8:23pm
International Society for the Study of Narrative Conference 2011

Below is a call for submissions to a proposed panel at the 2011 ISSN Conference.

Professor Brian McHale (Ohio State University) has generously agreed to moderate the panel if it is selected for inclusion in the conference. If you are interested, please send a 250-word abstract, paper title, and 100-word bio to lgleich@umd.edu by October 1st.

Panel Title: Poetic Devices and Narrative Dynamics

Multiple Childhoods/Multidisciplinary Perspectives: Interrogating Normativity in Childhood Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 4:31pm
Department of Childhood Studies, Rutgers University-Camden

We invite submissions for participation in a conference hosted by the Department of Childhood Studies of Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey, USA on Multiple Childhoods/ Multidisciplinary Perspectives. As a field, childhood studies has flourished in large part because scholars have recognized the necessity of moving between and beyond traditional academic disciplines and have resisted the idea that there exists one, normative version of childhood common to all.

Medievalist Fantasies of Christendom: The Medieval as a Christian Apologetic in the Inklings (Kalamazoo 2011; 9/15)

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 3:59pm
Cory Lowell Grewell

Papers in this panel will analyze in detail how medieval imagery and literary technique is used as Christian apologetic in the works of the Inklings. Papers should go beyond a simple notation of the usage of medieval imagery as apologetic, e.g. the medievalism of Lewis's Narnia Chronicles, and explore how the medieval imagery results in a Christian polemic and of what kind. Under this broad umbrella, there are several questions that might be explored, which might be important to a better understanding of the medievalisms of the Inklings: How authentic is the usage of the medieval in any given work or author to the Middle Ages, and what bearing does this authenticity have on the author's implicit or explicit apologetic stance?

Edited Collection -- Eugene O'Neill's One Act Plays (1/1/11 & 7/1/11)

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 3:29pm
Michael Y. Bennett, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater & Benjamin D. Carson, Bridgewater State College

CFP

Eugene O'Neill's One-Act Plays

Editors: Michael Y. Bennett and Benjamin D. Carson

Although Eugene O'Neill's work has generated much scholarship, his one-act plays have not received the critical attention they deserve. Given that O'Neill began his career writing one-act plays, including his justly famous "Sea Plays," associated with the Provincetown Players, it is surprising that his one-acts have been largely neglected. This current collection aims to fill the gap by examining O'Neill's one-act plays, during what can be considered O'Neill's formative writing years, and the formative period of American drama.

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