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No Way Forward? – Nonlinear Temporalities and 20th-Century Culture

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 11:34am
full name / name of organization: 
A roundtable at NeMLA / March 17-20, 2016 / Hartford, CT / Sara Marcus (Princeton University), Ezra Feldman (Cornell University)

The long twentieth century offers multiple examples of dramatic progress brought to a halt or even seemingly thrown into reverse: Freud writes about the first World War as foreclosing faith in human progress; the late '60s and early '70s brought complications to the Civil Rights movement and student movements; and the destruction of the Twin Towers on 9/11/2001 undermined the narrative of American capitalist triumph that had held sway since the end of the Cold War.

"Metaphors of Detection" Roundtable; NeMLA 2016 (Abstract Submission Deadline: Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 8:06am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

Metaphors make the detective. Whether Poe's "clew," Doyle's game metaphor ("the game's afoot"), or film noir's labyrinths, the governing metaphors of the great fictional detectives encapsulate the underlying social, hermeneutic, and cultural assumptions that govern their methods.

This roundtable seeks papers on any aspect of the guiding metaphors of detective fiction from the genre's origins to the present day. Short presentations on detective narratives in any genre, language, or medium are welcome; talks on a single metaphor, author, or nexus of metaphors and authors are of particular interest.

Reminder - Victorian Brain

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:47am
full name / name of organization: 
Victorian Network
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Victorian Network is an open-access, MLA-indexed, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to publishing and promoting the best postgraduate and early career work across the broad field of Victorian Studies. We are delighted to announce that our eleventh issue (Summer 2016) will be guest edited by Professor Sally Shuttleworth (University of Oxford), on the theme of the Victorian Brain.

CFP Extended Deadline

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:09am
full name / name of organization: 
Semper - Seminario Permanente di Poesia di Trento

Comunichiamo che il comitato direttivo di SEMPER - Seminario permanente di poesia diretto da Pietro Taravacci e Francesco Zambon ha stabilito di prorogare di dieci giorni la deadline per l'invio di proposte per il convegno Brevitas. Percorsi estetici tra forma breve e frammento nelle letterature occidentali, che si terrà nei giorni 4-6 novembre presso l'Università di Trento.

Un breve testo di presentazione e le linee di indagine proposte possono essere consultate all'indirizzo

[UPDATE] From Experiential to Expository: A Roundtable (NeMLA March 17-20, 2016; Deadline September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:06am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

By extending the learning environment beyond the classroom's boundaries, undergraduate programs have stimulated lively pedagogical innovation across general education disciplines. The approach encourages rigorous critical thought via assignments that require students to think critically and to reflect actively on links between course materials, historical sites, and concrete social and cultural concerns. However, the popularity for the experiential, fed by administrative and parental enthusiasm, may hinder instructors and encumber students.

Rethinking the Neuronovel: Towards a Narrative Model of Cognition

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 11:16pm
full name / name of organization: 
Hillel Broder / CUNY Graduate Center / NeMLA
contact email: 

Marco Roth has recently suggested that we are living in the age of the neuronovel—a narrative form that narrates cognition in terms of neurochemistry, diagnosis, and heredity. Though recent narratives of amnesia, schizophrenia, and autism are often quick to identify their symptoms and types, the history of neurotypical and non-neurotypical minds in fiction is a long one. Instead of reading such fictions through the lens of biology, psychology, or neuroscience, however, how might we discover models of cognition that emerge from within narrative experiment itself?

Diagnosis Literature: Medical Narratives of the Nineteenth Century--NEMLA 2016 Hartford

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Amanda Caleb/Misericordia University
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This panel seeks to explore how medical narrative was used in nineteenth-century fiction and medical texts as a counterargument to the medical gaze, thereby rewriting the medical history of the period from the patient's prospective. The use of medical narrative as a counter-current to the profession's paternalism indicates the subversive nature of nineteenth-century literature and reinforces the value of storytelling and narrative within the "factual" world of medicine.

Your Papers are Due at 3:00; My Panic Attack is at 4:00: Mental Illness in the Academy

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:45pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

In Mad at School, Margaret Price claims that "Persons with mental disabilities lack rhetoricity; we are rhetorically disabled." Our experience as academics with diagnosed mental disabilities bears witness to this silencing. While we advocate for our disabled students in powerful and vocal ways, we often find ourselves without voice, without power, without the language to articulate our own experiences to our colleagues, department chairs, deans, and to our students, the very same students we encourage to be honest and open in their own writing. We respectfully listen as students share their stories about mental illnesses and addictions; we make accommodations (even without ADA requirements); we refer them to support services.

One Sentence English Competition

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 8:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
Words in Place
contact email: 

"Words in Place," from the University of Waterloo's English Department, is announcing our first ever One Sentence English Contest!
(We're calling the contest OneSEC, because that's how long it will take you to submit the shortest academic application ever.)

The OneSEC prize is for the best single sentence in an academic essay in a peer-reviewed journal in 2014 by a scholar trained or nested in English. How is "best" defined? The judges are academics, so through peer review by a disparate group of scholars with competing priorities, naturally.* No affiliation with the University of Waterloo is required.

Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 7:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
ACLA
contact email: 

This seminar will explore the uses and limits of dialectical thinking as a critical tool for contemporary humanistic inquiry. Engaging with a literary and philosophical tradition that is nothing else if not comparative, we argue for the persistent value in understanding textual oppositions, contradictions, and self-negations not as conceptual limitations, but as sites of productive restlessness.

One Hundred Years of Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" - NeMLA 2016 (Deadline, Sept. 30)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 7:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association - Hartford, CT - March 17-20, 2015

Susan Glaspell's one-act play, "Trifles," premiered in Provincetown in 1916, during an era of historic upheaval in American gender relations. That same year, Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control center in the United States and Jeanette Rankin became the first woman elected to the US House of Representatives. The Nineteenth Amendment, of course, would be passed within three years. In the intervening century, the position of women in American society has evolved dramatically – 2016 may see the election of the first woman president – and yet the depiction of gender relations portrayed in "Trifles" remains trenchantly familiar to twenty-first-century readers.

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