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pedagogy

CFP-Digital Humanities in Foreign Languages & Literatures Courses (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
NeMLA, Washington DC. March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The objective of this roundtable is to discuss best practices to include, organize, and create digital initiatives (ranging from small assignments to large collaborative projects) in the context of foreign languages and literatures courses across the curriculum. What happens when we bring digital initiatives like wikis, blogs, video and image tagging, social networking, mapping, or annotating texts in foreign languages and literatures courses? What happens when we intersect the principles and methods of Digital Humanities with the teaching of foreign languages and literatures?

Shifting the Absent Present: Pedagogical Approaches for More Inclusive Spaces

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This session seeks to use the concept of the absent present (that which is embodied by students but unacknowledged) within the classroom as a method of disclosure. Such a method is dedicated to both the literal and figurative spaces that foster agency for students and instructors as they embody and articulate multiple critical identities. Particular focus will be placed on the ways student backgrounds and identities are erased or ignored through various means including syllabi, modeled language, instructor feedback, and assignment and assessment structures. Attention to that which is present within our students but goes unacknowledged or undervalued allows for the exploration of ways to better foster more inclusive spaces.

Critical Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:45pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 30, 2018

Call for Papers for NeMLA 2019 

 

Convention Site

Gaylord National Resort Center

Washington, DC

March 21-24, 2019

Convention Theme

Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples

 

Session: 17238.

Critical Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing  

(Panel)

Rhetoric & Composition / Cultural Studies and Media Studies

Chair: Maryann DiEdwardo (University of Maryland University College)

 

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Public Engagement (NeMLA 2019 Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
Nate Mickelson
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Public humanities scholar Doris Sommer argues that “learning to think like an artist and an interpreter is basic training for our volatile times.” She encourages teachers to involve students and community members in artistic practices—writing poems, performing skits, sharing music—in order to build critical literacy skills. Like many poets, poet-critics, and poet-teachers, Sommer describes aesthetic engagement as a way to produce critical insights and cultivate political community. According to this view, poetry invites or occasions experiences that alter readers’ perspectives. What we experience as we interpret a poem changes the way we interpret elements of everyday life. And these altered or enhanced perspectives open up new political possibilities.

Generating Debate in the Early American Literature Classroom

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Hugh Egan (Ithaca College)/ NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

What issues currently generate debate among our students as they read classic American texts from the pre-Civil War era? Racism in Rowlandson and Jefferson? Toxic economic self-interest in Franklin? Paternalism in Emerson and Thoreau? This pedagogical roundtable will be devoted to a discussion of how we keep the 21st century student engaged with American texts from the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. I am especially interested in the balance (if that is the right word) we strike between encouraging aesthetic appreciation of a work while simultaneously inviting sharp cultural/historical critique.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: How Can Adjuncts, Graduate Students, and Tenured Professors Better Fight for the University We Want?

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:00pm
Michael Druffel / CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel, part of the NeMLA 2019 conference in Washington, DC from March 21-24, 2019, aims to bring together adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors to discuss how we can all work together to fight for a more democratic and just work environment. Topics might include ways to build solidarity to improve working conditions, more democratic ways to share power and responsibility between adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors, and ways to increase diversity in the university. Other topics that address solidarity between all workers in the university are welcome.

Teaching 20th Century American Science Fiction Writers Including Harlan Ellison, Phillip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:25pm
Annette M. Magid/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Science Fiction has always functioned as a literary multi-purpose vehicle in which writers are able to explore potentialities of the human condition. Even though sci-fi has been maligned by many as a poorly constructed near-juvenile literary form, scholars have discovered that sci-fi also provides a path from which one can bear witness into past practices and analyze the possibilities for the future.  The focus of this roundtable is to assess the influence of American science fiction writers to discuss the topics and techniques Harlan Ellison, Phillip K.

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