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pedagogy

Vision & Form: Teaching Writing Across Borders

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:37pm
New York University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

VISION & FORM: TEACHING WRITING ACROSS BORDERS

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

APRIL 24-25, 2020

Special Issue Call for Papers: Using Popular Culture to Bring Awareness, Develop Understanding, and Find Solutions to Issues in our Contemporary World

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:32am
Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Submission deadline: August 1, 2019

Expected publication date: February 2020

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue on the intersection between popular culture texts, broadly conceptualized, and awareness, understanding, and solutions to issues in contemporary society.

How are you using popular culture to understand or teach about the contemporary world? What practices, innovations, and theories are you reinterpreting or creating to better conceptualize the current political climate? In what ways have popular culture texts allowed you to dig deeper, bring awareness, uncover solutions, or highlight contemporary issues, including but not limited to:

Rhetoric Panel Proposal for Rhetoric Society of America 2020

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:11am
Rhetoric Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

RHETORIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA 2020 PANEL PROPOSAL

 

“Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion or Response-ability?”
Portland, Oregon (May 21-24)

rhetoric / hospitality

 

Chair: Dr. Ryan Leack

 

“Language speaks. Man speaks in that he responds to language. This responding is a hearing. It hears because it listens to the command of stillness.”

 

—Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought (1971)

 

Double Helix, Volume 7

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:11am
Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Submissions are invited for Volume 7 of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing. For more information, please visit DH at the WAC Clearinghouse at Colorado State University: https://wac.colostate.edu/double-helix/.

Towards Equitable Language Instruction for the Intercultural Classroom (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:34am
Janice Willson / Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel session invites an examination of pedagogical adaptations at the departmental, class, or individual student level, highlighting opportunities to recognize and include different types of learners.

Identity, Culture, Metacognition: Tools and Themes for the First-year Seminar

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 9:49am
Northeast Modern Language Association (seminar session)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This seminar session is to be held at the 2020 Northeast Modern Language Association annual meeting in Boston, MA, 5-8 March 2020. The session seeks to foster a robust research-informed conversation among five to ten teacher-scholars about teaching undergraduate students in a first-year seminar (or similar curricular offering), employing identity, culture and/or metacognition as thematic content and/or instructional strategies. Successful candidates will submit a an abstract proposing a substantive, research-informed, thesis-driven paper that seeks to promote consequential, transformative learning.

Loose Dresses, Loose Women: Pedagogies of Harlots and Whores from Hogarth to the Haus of Gaga (NeMLA panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Loose Dresses, Loose Women:nPedagogies of Harlots and Whores from Hogarth to the Haus of Gaga

Chairs Tommy Mayberry (Office of Teaching and Learning, University of Guelph) and Debra Bourdeau (College of Arts and Sciences, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide)

Teaching Popular Culture in Intermediate Italian - ROUNDTABLE

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:07pm
NeMLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In the recent years, foreign language teaching has advocated for an increasingly intermedial and interdisciplinary approach, one that enables instructors to expand course materials and integrate a wide array of popular and current cultural products. Advanced courses in Italian literature and culture can develop curricula that more liberally incorporate popular culture into teaching. Yet intermediate courses must combine cultural components with the introduction or the review of grammar structures. This session seeks contributions that address the following: What are the challenges of transitioning from grammar-based to culture-based instruction in intermediate language classes?

Teaching and Engaging Shakespeare in the Classroom (NeMLA 2020, roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:01pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

More than 400 years after his death Shakespeare is still taught in western universities and throughout the world. The number of published books related to his works as well as similarly devoted scholarly conferences seem to increase yearly. This means that what and how to approach teaching Shakespeare is not stagnant as might be imagined, but rather is expanding. The number of plays attributed to Shakespeare have seen some fluctuations, but the theory and scholarly research applied to pinch and prod his works continue to produce new stimulating insights. This gives the teacher more options on what to include in their lessons and by necessity, what to exclude. It is no easy choice deciding what to focus on in the classroom.

NeMLA Convention 2020: Formalism and Fun: On Experiencing Text and Time in the Classroom

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 12:19pm
Shun Y. Kiang / University of Central Oklahoma
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Time is of the essence, and academia has responded accordingly. From measuring objectives and outcomes, to the shortening of course sequences, and from the promotion of multimodal learning and multitasking, to the emphasis on testing over slower, but pleasurable, processes of meaning-making, teaching and learning in the classroom has become rushed and fraught, especially in areas such as composition and the study of literature, where teachers and students struggle to keep up, delivering and demonstrating knowledge efficiently n homogenous, empty time. Keep up or fail: a false dilemma now normalized, forcing itself upon us. In The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy (2016), however, Maggie Berg and Barbara K.

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