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pedagogy

Disclosing Class: Pedagogy and the Working Class

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2016 - 10:14am
Katelynn DeLuca/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Researcher and social activist Jean Anyon, in her investigations of social class reproduction in education, suggests "there is a ‘hidden curriculum’ in school work that has profound implication for theory—and practice—in education” (“Social Class” 67). By making class unhidden in the curriculum, students no longer feel they must "hide" themselves, and allows faculty to foster more honest conversations and writing about such issues.

Writing Beyond the Language Requirement

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2016 - 8:50pm
Kristen M. Turpin, Villanova University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

NeMLA 2017 in Baltimore, MD

March 23-26

Writing Beyond the Language Requirement 

Recently, scholars have recognized that “L2 writing is not only an ability to acquire, teach, and assess—as is conventionally assumed—but L2 writing is also a means, context, and basis for learning, both of language and of writing” (Manchón, 2011, x). That is, second language writing involves both learning to write and writing to learn. What does this mean for our curricula?

Modern Technology in the Composition Classroom

updated: 
Friday, June 10, 2016 - 12:22pm
John Misak/New York Institute of Technology
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

Modern Technology in the Composition Classroom Presiding Officer: John Misak, New York Institute of Technology

This session would focus on the implementation of modern technologies (digital texts, smart devices, social media, video games, etc.) in first-year writing and strategies to incorporate them in the classroom. It will explore research, empirical and theoretical, on technology as an aid to writing instruction, and ways to navigate common pitfalls with the practice.

 

Proposal link: http://www.pamla.org/node/add/proposal

4th Annual Conference on Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking--Oct. 28, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 10:51am
Consortium for Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

Embracing Innovation: Transcending Tradition in Twenty-First Century Higher Education

CCRWT will present its fourth annual interdisciplinary conference on Friday, October 28, 2016. The primary objectives of this year's conference are to explore innovative pedagogical practices that both enrich and transcend traditional teaching methods, and to inspire a contemplative, cross-disciplinary dialogue regarding higher education in the twenty-first century.

16124 Progressive Pedagogy: Long-Term Academic Competence from the Composition Class

updated: 
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 10:59am
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Submit via http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/submit.html

 

In an economy where the bachelor’s degree is what the high school diploma once was for obtaining a living wage, are colleges and universities equipped to handle the wide range of abilities for students who are focused more on getting through than learning to appreciate how a liberal arts education may better equip them for the job market?

 

2016 PCEA Conference: Comics and/as Rhetoric

updated: 
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 11:00am
Pennsylvania College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

2016 PCEA Conference CFP

Comics and/as Rhetoric: (Anti)Static Narratives

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

October 21-22, 2016

Newly Extended Deadline: July 16, 2016

 

Keynote Speaker, Conor McCreery, Kill Shakespeare Writer

Pow! Graphic Literature to Engage Students in the Creative Writing Workshop

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:51am
Maureen McVeigh Trainor / West Chester University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

CFP for NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention in Baltimore, MD. http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

Students in creative writing workshops often lack reading experience and knowledge, but demonstrate awareness and analysis of film and television. Graphic literature can be used to transition from the terminology and rhetorical understanding they possess to the writing and feedback skills the workshop demands. This roundtable seeks to present and discuss both recommended texts and strategies to engage students and encourage their creative writing. Theoretical and practical approaches to this method are welcome.

 

Overlooked, Forgotten, or Maligned: Bringing Minor Characters Into Focus

updated: 
Tuesday, July 19, 2016 - 6:04am
NeMLA 2017 - Baltimore, MD
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2015

This panel seeks to investigate how we can (re)read classic American novels when analyzing them via secondary/minor characters. For example, how does the town of Maycomb change when read through Jack Finch? Does Jordan Baker give us insight into The Great Gatsby that no other character provides? Secondary characters are often overlooked when teaching and/or researching classic American novels, and this panel seeks to remedy that problem. By exhuming the often maligned supporting cast, we can see classic novels with fresh eyes, deepening our understanding of canonical stories while illuminating new ways of teaching these novels to our students.

 

Social Identity, Affect, and the First-Year Writing Classroom

updated: 
Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 12:29pm
Northeast MLA convention
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

CFP for NeMLA 2017, Baltimore  March 23rd-26th: The first-year writing seminar is a course that fulfills many goals of transitioning students to college-level writing, reading, and discussion. It is one of the first places that students grapple with those “structures of feeling” that gather around social identity and difference. This panel seeks papers that explore pedagogical approaches to affect and social identity in the writing classroom. What approaches help students struggle to write across the gap between feelings, social identity, and analysis? What pedagogies help create spaces of diversity for both feelings and minority identities in the first-year classroom?

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