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2019 Call for Papers: Jeffers's Inevitable Place

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 1:59pm
Robinson Jeffers Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 12, 2018

Jeffers’s Inevitable Place
2019 Robinson Jeffers Association Annual Meeting
February 15-17, 2019
Carmel Woman’s Club, Carmel, CA

Nineteenth-Century Literature (CEA 3/28-3/30/19)

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 11:13am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Subject: Call for Papers: Nineteenth-Century Literature at CEA 2019   

Call for Papers, Nineteenth-Century Literature at CEA 2019     

March 28-30, 2019 | New Orleans, Louisiana

Astor Crowne Plaza

739 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 | Phone: (504) 962-0500

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on nineteenth-century literature for our 50th annual conference. Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org

Radical Elegy: Memorial Praxis for Precarious Life

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:31pm
David Sherman, Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association), March 7-10, 2019, Georgetown University, Washington DC

Radical Elegy: Memorial Praxis for Precarious Life

 

This seminar addresses elegy as a performative repertoire in political extremity.  Elegy, at a radical pitch, occupies public space and public memory to resist forgetting, a second death.  How have expressive practices to and for the dead generated ideas of justice, bonds of solidarity, ethical responses to violence, and communities of contested memory?

 

Music in Literature, NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:19pm
Julia Titus, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

A multidisciplinary research focusing on the complex interrelationship of music and literature has expanded rapidly in the recent years. There are numerous examples in European and American literatures, both in poetry and prose, where music plays a vital rolе (Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov, Proust, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, George Eliot, Henry James, and many others), and while there has been many published studies focusing on the formal relationship between the sister arts of music and literature (Steven Paul Scher “Literature and Music,” Werner Woft “The Musicalization of Fiction,” Delia de Souza Correa “George Eliot, Music and Victorian Culture”), there has not been much research focused specifically on music or musical performance within the text.

CFP: Multilingual Poetry Today: Sound, Sense and Self in Motion

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA Convention, Washington DC, March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“A nomadic poetics will cross languages,” states Pierre Joris, “not just translate, but write in all or any of them.” His foreshadowing of contemporary trends brings us to consider the stakes of multilingual fluency in works by Anne Tardos, Uljana Wolf, Jérôme Game, and Erin Mouré, among others. If the Modernists commonly tied multilingualism to erudite allusions, what forms do polyglot poets today use to restore cultural specificity? How do multilingual practices reframe figures of the foreign(er) and translatability? What reading communities do such works engender? Can multilingual poetry published in Anglophone countries resist becoming a trope of global culture?

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA (March 21-24, 2019; Washington D.C.)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

Studies of versification tend to be silent on race, and with some exceptions (such as Anthony Reed’s 2014 Freedom Time), studies of race and poetic form tend to turn away from the mechanics of versification. As Dorothy Wang argues in Thinking its Presence: Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (2014), most accounts of poetic form revolve around the technical accomplishments of white poets, while minority figures are seen as more valuable for their poetry’s social or thematic content. What would happen if nonwhite poets were read for their proficiency with poetic forms, and were made the center of conversations about poetic technique? 

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Public Engagement (NeMLA 2019 Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
Nate Mickelson
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Public humanities scholar Doris Sommer argues that “learning to think like an artist and an interpreter is basic training for our volatile times.” She encourages teachers to involve students and community members in artistic practices—writing poems, performing skits, sharing music—in order to build critical literacy skills. Like many poets, poet-critics, and poet-teachers, Sommer describes aesthetic engagement as a way to produce critical insights and cultivate political community. According to this view, poetry invites or occasions experiences that alter readers’ perspectives. What we experience as we interpret a poem changes the way we interpret elements of everyday life. And these altered or enhanced perspectives open up new political possibilities.

Roundtable: Phenomenology and Poetics

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:53pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This roundtable will evaluate the relevance of the philosophical field of phenomenology—the rigorous study of the structures of consciousness and bodily experience—to twentieth and twenty-first century American poetry through a series of short paper presentations. “[W]ords … are,” Maurice Merleau-Ponty argues in Phenomenology of Perception, “ways of singing the world, and … they are destined to represent objects, not through an objective resemblance … but because they are extracted from them, and literally represent their emotional essence” (193).

NeMLA 2019 panel: The Use of Audacity and Candor in Women's Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Audacity” is having a moment in the women’s movement. Festivals, conferences and training sessions have used the term as shorthand for women speaking their truth and owning the power to direct the outcomes of their lives. (The Audacious Women Festival in Scotland and the Audacious Women’s Network in South Africa are two examples.)

Yet audacity is not new. Throughout history, outspoken women writers of fiction, poetry, and plays have positioned themselves in the vanguard of audacity, defying public censure and personal isolation to write candidly about their world. Transgression is a disruptor of patriarchal norms. Candor is transformational when it is deployed to pose questions, shatter stereotypes, and incite change.

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