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SAMLA 2015: Poet-Artist Collaborations (Durham, NC, November 13-15)

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:58pm
full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel explores SAMLA 87's theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations found in book arts, broadside printings, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

MSA 17, 19-22 Nov.: Modernism's Revolutionary Geographies

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:27pm
full name / name of organization: 
Candis Bond
contact email: 

Modernism's Revolutionary Geographies*
*Please send 300-word abstract and brief CV (one page) to Candis Bond at cbond2@slu.edu by April 01, 2015.

Building on the recent €œ"spatial turn"€ in modernist studies exemplified by scholars such as Andrew Thacker in Moving through Modernity: Space and Geography in Modernism (2003) and Rebecca Walsh in The Geopoetics of Modernism (2015), and in keeping with the conference theme of revolution, this panel considers modernism's innovative contributions to the ontology and perception of urban space, focusing particularly on counter-normative cartographies and deviant spatial practices.

Fabricating the Body: Post-modern and Post-human Bodies (MMLA: Columbus, OH Nov. 12-15 2015)

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 12:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This year's Fabricating the Body panel is soliciting proposals for papers that explore the notion of bodies in our post-human or post-modern culture. Given this year's theme of "Arts and Sciences," this panel seeks papers that consider how scientific inquiry and philosophy has impacted our understanding of bodies in media (literature, film, comics, video games etc.) or as consumers of media. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, theories of the post-human or post-modern body; (dis)abled, queer, global, marginalized, etc.

Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century - due date June 3 2015

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 12:15pm
full name / name of organization: 
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_
contact email: 

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs. Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.

[UPDATE] LITERARY LONDON ANNUAL CONFERENCE 22-24 July 2015 DEADLINE EXTENDED to 31st MARCH

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 9:05am
full name / name of organization: 
The Literary London Society

22–24 July 2015
Conference Theme: 'London in Love'
Hosted by the Institute of English Studies, University of London

Confirmed Plenary Speakers:
Imtiaz Dharker (poet, artist and documentary film-maker)
Dr. Gregory Dart (University College London)
Professor Kate Flint (University of Southern California)

Chapter Proposals for "Literature and Ecofeminism"; April 1, 2015 Deadline

updated: 
Sunday, March 8, 2015 - 6:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
D. A. Vakoch / California Institute of Integral Studies
contact email: 

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited volume on ecofeminist literary criticism titled Literature and Ecofeminism. Contributions covering a range of literary forms from diverse cultures and national traditions are welcome. Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract, 200-word biography, and sample of a previously published chapter or article to dvakoch@ciis.edu by April 1, 2015. Proposers will be notified about whether their submissions are accepted for the book by April 15, 2015. For accepted proposals first drafts of full chapters (8,000 – 9,000 words) are due by September 1, 2015, and final versions are due November 1, 2015.

The Reader Over His Shoulder: Reading Public(s) Exemplified in the Work of Robert Graves, 7-10 Jan 2016, Austin, Texas

updated: 
Sunday, March 8, 2015 - 2:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
Michael Joseph / Robert Graves Society
contact email: 

Non-guaranteed Special Session proposed for the 131 annual MLA Conference

In the preface to his Collected Poems, 1945, Robert Graves states: "I write poems for poets, and satires or grotesques for wits. For people in general I write prose, and am content that they should be unaware that I do anything else. To write poems for other than poets is wasteful."

These views reflect Graves's lifelong preoccupation with the complex question of a reading public—for whom should a writer write, and how does the notion of a reading public (even if only an idealized meta-public) inform an author's creative vision, the sense of his or her vocation and relationship to history.

MSA 17 - Modernism's Reiterations

updated: 
Saturday, March 7, 2015 - 8:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Modernist Studies Association

In "Tradition and the Practice of Poetry", T.S. Eliot states that "The perpetual task of poetry is to make all things new. Not necessarily to make new things." In a similar vein, in ABC of Reading, Ezra Pound famously argues that literature is "news that stays news". Years after its hey-day, how do we understand modernism's commitment to the "new"? From a contemporary standpoint, how has modernism's past been made new again? From W.B. Yeats' turning gyre, to Charlie Chaplin's persistent factory gears in Modern Times, we can gather that when it comes to modernism, "revolution" need not only mean change, but also the very cyclicality of change itself.

Hearing Voices (MSA 17, 11/19-11/22, Boston)

updated: 
Saturday, March 7, 2015 - 10:29am
full name / name of organization: 
Reena Sastri
contact email: 

MSA 17: Hearing Voices

How do we hear poetic voice? How do poems reflect and respond to language as spoken and heard? Moving beyond habitual equations of voice with sincerity, what perspectives might we bring to bear on the phenomenon of hearing and the idea of voice in the poetry of modernism and after?

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