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Fairy Tales Area at PCA/ACA in Seattle, March 22-25, 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 - 12:34pm
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

The Fairy Tales Area of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association seeks paper presentations on any topic involving fairy tales. While our interests are broad and inclusive, we invite papers that discuss fairy tales in contemporary popular culture (TV shows, movies, graphic novels, advertising, toys, video games, popular literature, etc), revisions and adaptations of fairy tales, etc. Still, we are interested in as wide an array of papers as possible, so please do not hesitate to send a submission on any fairy tale related subject.

'Werewolves: Studies in Transformations' (abstracts: 30th November 2015, full submissions: 31st March 2016)

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 - 7:01am
Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck, ‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’

'Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural' is a peer-reviewed, online journal looking at the supernatural, the uncanny and the weird. Revenant is now accepting articles, creative writing pieces and book, film, game, event or art reviews for a themed issue on werewolves (due Autumn 2016), guest edited by Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck.

Call for Papers and Art - Interdisciplinary Human Rights Journal | Theme: #BlackLivesMatter | Deadline: January 15, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 10:17pm
Journal for Human Advancement: Independent Projects for Progress and Human Rights | The Goodis Center for Research and Reform, Inc.

We are seeking submissions for the February/March 2016 issue on the following theme:

#BlackLivesMatter

Submissions must be received by January 15, 2016, and may approach this topic from any perspective. Papers and artwork need not explicitly cite #BlackLivesMatter in the body of the submission. Our editors are looking for works addressing #BLM as a social movement, as it relates to the civil rights movement, as related to police reform and accountability, and in any other context.

Theory, Identity, and Subversion: CFP

updated: 
Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 9:35am
Lehigh Valley Vanguard

Independent journal Lehigh Valley Vanguard seeks submissions to expand our ongoing narrative of subversion and resistance. Our suggested topics:
Updated September 27th, 2015

Submissions in PROSE

We accept editorial prose, traditional academic papers, book, film, and television reviews, memoir narratives, flash fiction, art reviews, and open letters.

-Ontology and identity
-Critical pedagogy
-Non-canonical literature
-The end of history and global capitalism
-Intersectional feminism
-Queer literature
-Biopolitics and neoliberalism
-Critical race theory

Submissions can be 500-2,500 words. We welcome non-academic and even anti-academic writing.

UPDATE - 25th Annual British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference - February 26-27, 2016 - Savannah GA

updated: 
Friday, September 25, 2015 - 1:11pm
BCPCS Conference

The British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference, inaugurated in 1992, is the oldest and longest-running annual meeting of its kind in the United States. It encompasses colonial and postcolonial histories, literatures, creative and performing arts, politics, economics, and all other aspects of the countries formerly colonized by Britain and other European powers.

We welcome a variety of approaches and viewpoints, and the generation of wide-ranging, productive debates. Thus we are particularly interested in interdisciplinary and/or cross-cultural panel proposals.

"Cities of the Future" - 2016 NeMLA - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 5:27pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

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