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Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 12:34pm
Birkbeck, University of London

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture
30th October 2015
Birkbeck, University of London

"Though it is in the first place a faculty of individual minds, it is clear that attention has also become an acute collective problem of modern life—a cultural problem." -- Matthew B. Crawford, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction (2015)

"Pop Scene: Culture and Opposition in 1990s Britain"

Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 9:56pm
Dr Benjamin Halligan / University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Call for Proposals:

"Pop Scene: Culture and Opposition in 1990s Britain"

Proposals are invited for an edited collection that will assess British popular culture in the 1990s. Particular emphasis will be placed on the years characterised by cultural opposition to the Conservative government and then the coming to office in 1997 of the New Labour government, and the aftermath.

New Journal: The Bulletin of International Association for Robin Hood Studies

Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 1:33pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies

The International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS) is pleased to announce the creation of a new, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. The journal will be published bi-annually beginning in Spring 2016 and will be available on the IARHS' website, Robin Hood Scholars: IARHS on the Web: Scholars are invited to send original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition.

"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
Jessica Tabak / Brown University

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
University of Hull

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

Proposed Edited Collection on American Women Writers and Liminality 10 Dec 2015

Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:03pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers


The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.