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"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
Jessica Tabak / Brown University

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
University of Hull

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

Proposed Edited Collection on American Women Writers and Liminality 10 Dec 2015

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:03pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A PROPOSED SSAWW EDITED COLLECTION
CALL FOR SENIOR SCHOLAR TO WRITE PREFACE

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.

Looking for Public Humanities Pieces on "America"

updated: 
Friday, July 17, 2015 - 8:55pm
'Merica Magazine: for the unlikely patriot......

It is our contention that a magazine like this has needed to exist for a while. There needs to be a home for the complicated patriot, the unlikely patriot.The sociologist Robert Bellah believed that the United States had a civil religion that was to be contrasted with that of other nations. If that's true – and we think it is – then this is a magazine for the agnostics. What can one say? America seems like a pretty good idea – we should try it some time.

To get what we're up to check out our website at mericamagazine.org (that's "Merica," not "America," lest you accidentally go to the other - though excellent - magazine of that name). Check out especially the "About" section and the "Submission" section for a fuller idea of our concept.

Reading Risk in Contemporary U.S. Fiction and Culture (02/10/15) - A Postgraduate and Early Career Rersearcher Colloquium

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:03am
University of Birmingham, UK

Five days after 9/11, Republican Party activist James Pinkerton proclaimed that 'the World Trade Center has been destroyed, but this has also been a crushing defeat for irony, cynicism and hipness. Here in New York, the city that gave the world Seinfeld, Sex and the City and Studio 54, the victors now are sincerity, patriotism and earnestness' (Newsday, September 16th, 2001). Has Pinkerton's claim come true? If traditional values like sincerity, patriotism and earnestness are ascendant, what space is left for texts that risk to contest or query the status-quo? Should we abhor risk as the cause of the financial crash, or pine for risky artistic practices that might instigate change? Do we need the texts we study to be risky?

CFP: 42nd Annual Conference of the African Literature Association (April 6-9, 2016)

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 10:54am
African Literature Association

Emory University and Kennesaw State University
cordially invite you to submit your proposals for seminars, roundtables, and panels
at the
African Literature Association 2016 Conference

Justice and Human Dignity in Africa
and the African Diaspora

Venues: Marriott Marquis and National Center for Civil and Human Rights in
Atlanta, Georgia. USA.
April 6-9, 2016
Conference website: http://ala2016.com

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