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[UPDATE] Public Intellectuals Lecture Series (Fall 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 8:05pm
Carleton University

DEADLINE EXTENDED: August 18

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series has just wrapped up a successful spring lineup featuring four fantastic, well attended lectures. We are now planning a second series for the fall.

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series aims to create a bridge between scholars in the Arts and the general public. While the complex ideas these scholars help develop have important, real world applications to the way we understand and interact with each other, they are often couched in jargon and confined to the journals and lecture halls of the academic sphere. This lecture series will offer a venue and format in which scholars can present these ideas to the public in an accessible manner.

"Global Poe" Seminar for ACLA Conference at Harvard, Mar. 17-20, 2016 (submissions from Sept. 1-23, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 3:33pm
Emron Esplin / Department of English, Brigham Young University

The following CFP is for a seminar I have co-organized with Margarida Vale de Gato for the upcoming convention of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) held from March 17-20, 2016 at Harvard University. ACLA's annual meeting uses a seminar format in which 8-15 participants meet together for 2-3 days to share their papers. To submit a paper, go to the ACLA website at www.acla.org, click on "annual meeting," and then click on "submit a paper." The website will not be accepting submissions until September 1. The CFP below is currently available under "Global Poe" on the ACLA website. After September 1, a link will be available for you to submit a paper directly to the seminar.

Shakespeare's Italy (abstract due Sept. 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 10:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the complex and multi-faceted relationship between Shakespeare and Italy. Key areas of focus will be, among other things, the impact of the Italian Renaissance on England; early modern English translations of Italian works; Shakespeare's use of Italian texts for both direct source and indirect inspiration; Italian settings and characters in Shakespeare's plays; the influence of Italian genres, such as tragicomedy, in Shakespeare's drama; early modern English attitudes towards Italy in general and certain Italians (such as Machiavelli) in particular; and later Italian adaptations of Shakespeare, particularly for the opera and for the cinema.

Girls' Voices August 25, 2015; April 7-9, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 9:16am
International Girls' Studies Association Conference

Over the past few years, there has been an increasing concern about the prevalence of uptalk, vocal fry, and other markers of so-called Valley Girl-speak among young women across America. Some pundits question the individuality, confidence, believability, professionalism, and hirability of women who adopt these vocal patterns. Others object to them on aesthetic grounds, complaining that girly voices are just plain irritating. For many, if women are to have a metaphorical voice, they must carefully manage the prosody of their literal one.

Heidelberg Center for American Studies 13th Annual Spring Academy Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 8:59am
Heidelberg Center for American Studies

Heidelberg, Germany, 14-18 March, 2016

Call for Papers

The thirteenth HCA Spring Academy on American History, Culture, and Politics will be held from March 14-18, 2016. The Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) invites applications for this annual one-week conference that provides twenty international Ph.D. students with the opportunity to present and discuss their Ph.D. projects.

The HCA Spring Academy will also offer participants the chance to work closely with experts in their respective fields of study. For this purpose, workshops held by visiting scholars will take place during this week.

'We All Have These Thoughts Sometimes': Stevie Smith Conference, 11th March 2016; Jesus College, Oxford

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 5:56am
Noreen Masud (Oxford); Dr Frances White (Kingston)

'We all have these thoughts sometimes.'
-- Stevie Smith, Some Are More Human Than Others (1958)

The work of Stevie Smith (1902-1971) has received uneven critical attention. Widely loved outside the academy, her novels and poetry resist traditional modernist narratives.

However, Smith is enjoying a revival both within and beyond academia. Not only has Virago Press recently re-released her novels, but a critical edition of her poems is forthcoming.

Given this resurgence in popular and academic interest in her writing, we invite you to share 'thoughts' on Stevie Smith's work, for a one-day conference in Oxford. Contributors may consider, but need not be limited to:

Museum Engagements in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature; NeMLA 2016; Hartford, CT; March 17-20, 2016 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 5:11pm
NeMLA 2016

The rise of the modern museum was (and remains) a global event that resonates across literary cultures. Germain Bazin termed the nineteenth century the "Museum Age" for the myriad ways the new phenomenon of the public museum redefined the social status of art. This session investigates how this development was received by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglophone authors writing during and immediately following the rise of the modern museum.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

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