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Reminder-Order and Disorder Symposium-September 20th, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - 9:33am
ISSH of Jendouba, Université de Jendouba, Jendouba, Tunisie

Full title: Order and Disorder Symposium
Date: 6-Nov - 7-Nov 2015
Location: ISSH of Jendouba, Université de Jendouba, Jendouba, Tunisie
Contact person: Sihem Arfaoui
Meeting email: order.disorder15@yahoo.fr
Call deadline: September 20th, 2015.
Symposium language: English, French and/or Arabic.

New Mediums of Modernism: Modernism and Popular Culture- SAMLA- 6/12 Deadline

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 10:48pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)

Peter Nicholls argues that modernism should not be conceived of as a large single movement but as a multiplicity of smaller undertakings that at once reinforced, contradicted, drove, and inhibited one another. These diverse submovements were united only by their shared inspiration--the emerging technologies, ideas, and events that were rapidly remaking the world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

RSA 2016: The Apprentices of Early Modern English Literature - Deadline: June 7th

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 6:56pm
Drew Heverin

From Heywood's Four Prentices (1592) to William Vallans' Honourable Apprentice (1616) and the anonymous ballad "A Use of Exhortation" on behalf of Charles I (1643), apprentices have played a crucial if liminal role in the literature of the early modern city, one that should not be overlooked when considering this riotous urban cohort. In that vein, this panel seeks papers that explore the role of apprenticeship in the literature of early modern England. Papers might address these or related questions: How did authors represent the voice of this politically active group? How did depictions of apprentices establish or destabilize the merchant ethos of the early modern marketplace?

[UPDATE] Teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 5:47pm
This Rough Magic / www.thisroughmagic.org

This Rough Magic (www.thisroughmagic.org) is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

We are seeking academic, teachable articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

•Authorship
•Genre Issues
•Narrative Structure
•Poetry
•Drama
•Epic
•Nation/Empire/Class
•Economics
•History
•Religion
•Superstition
•Philosophy and Rhetoric
•Race/Ethnicity
•Multi-Culturalism
•Gender
•Sexuality
•Art

NCSA Emerging Scholars Award

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 2:25pm
Nineteenth Century Studies Association

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2016 Emerging Scholars Award. The work of emerging scholars represents the promise and long-term future of interdisciplinary scholarship in 19th-century studies. In recognition of the excellent publications of this constituency of emerging scholars, this award will be given to an outstanding article or essay published within five years of the author's doctorate. Entries can be from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (the French Revolution to World War I); they must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and must be by a single author. Submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged.

NCSA 2016 Article Prize

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 2:24pm
Nineteenth Century Studies Association

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2016 Article Prize, which recognizes excellence in scholarly studies from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (French Revolution to World War I). The winner will receive a cash award of $500 to be presented at the Thirty-seventh Annual NCSA Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska, April 13-16, 2016.

The New and the Novel in the 19th Century/New Directions in 19th-Century Studies April 13-16, Lincoln, Nebraska

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 2:22pm
Nineteenth Century Studies Association

We invite papers and panels that investigate any aspect of the new and the novel in the long 19th century, including forms and genres (song cycles, photography, "loose baggy monsters"), fashions and roles (the dandy, crinoline, Berlin wool work), aesthetics (Pater, panoramas), the old made new (Graecophilia, dinosaurs), crimes and vices (serial murder, racial science), faiths (Mormons, Positivists), geographies (frontiers, the source of the Nile), models of heroism (Custer, Byron, F. Nightingale), times (railroad tables, the eight-hour-day), psychologies (phrenology, chirology, Freud), attractions (the Great Exhibition, sensation fiction, Yellowstone), and anxieties (Chartism, empire).

[UPDATE] Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century - due date extended to June 19 2015

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 1:27pm
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs. Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.

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