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KiSSiT: SHAKESPEARE AND THE STATE OF EXCEPTION, Kingston-upon-Thames, December 19, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 6:52pm
Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory (KiSSiT), part of the London Graduate School, is a forum for research by postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and early career scholars with an interest in Shakespeare, philosophy and theory. The program is committed to thinking through Shakespeare about urgent contemporary issues in dialogue with the work of past and present philosophers—from Aristotle to Žižek.

Following the success of its conference on 'Shakespeare and Waste', Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory seeks participants for a one-day conference on 'Shakespeare and the State of Exception' to be held on Saturday 19 December, 2015 at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames.

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City. [Deadline: Sept. 30, 2015]

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 6:36am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) / March 17-20, 2016 - Hartford, CT

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City (Creative)

Creative Writing, Editing and Publishing / Canadian

Chair(s)
Kristen Smith (University of York)

Puneet Dutt (Ryerson University)

Abstract

Writers of fiction, poetry, and drama are encouraged to submit a selection of creative prose (a 250-word abstract) concerning the Postmodern aesthetic, urbanization, or the construction of home and identity for a fifteen-minute presentation.

Submit here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15861

Description

MELUS Special Issue CFP: Pedagogy in Anxious Times

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:57pm
Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the US

2017 Special Issue Call For Papers in MELUS

Teaching Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States: Pedagogy in Anxious Times
Guest Editors: Cristina Stanciu and Anastasia Lin

[UPDATE] Fools on the Premodern Page and Stage (Kalamazoo, May 12–15, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 12:44pm
Angela Heetderks, Oberlin College

Near the end of the Middle English romance Robert of Cisyle, the eponymous king—who has been punished for his pride by being made to serve as his own court's fool—acknowledges the error of his former ways: "For he ys a fole [. . .] / That turneth hys wytt unto folye" (CUL Ff. 2. 38, ll. 398–9). Such condemnations of fools and folly—in Robert of Cisyle, underwritten by the pope and an angel—in no way served to stem the tide of medieval and early modern interest in fools and folly. Literary evidence shows that many premodern writers and their audiences "turn[ed their] wytt vn to folye": fools filled the stage and page, pervading multiple literary genres.

Reading Literally: Allegory and New Materialism *NeMLA 2016 (ABSTRACTS DUE 9/30/15)*

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 10:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

In Material Ecocriticism, Serenella Iovino and Serpil Oppermann suggest that all matter is storied matter. This session seeks to open up new ways of reading allegorical figures with the insights and methodologies of new materialism. Dante and Aquinas' exegetical levels—literal to allegorical to tropological to anagogical—move increasingly up and away from the material ground on which the allegorical figure is built. This session asks panelists to focus their attention back on the literal: the base matter of the allegorical figure that is so often passed over for readings further up the exegetical chain.

[REMINDER] ACLA 2016 - "Literary (De)Formations"

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 1:53pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

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