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"Time and Place in T. S. Eliot and His Contemporaries" - International Symposium, 18-21 January 2015, Florence, Italy

updated: 
Sunday, September 14, 2014 - 3:40am
full name / name of organization: 
Romualdo Del Bianco Foundation & Life Beyond Tourism

Time and place have huge symbolic significance in Eliot's work and that of his contemporaries. Space and time exist as symbolical, religious, philosophical, historical, political and personal 'nodes' in Eliot's writings. This conference wants to explore these 'nodes' in greater depth — where they exist, how they interact with other nodes and themes in Eliot's writing, and how they intersect with the aesthetic and philosophical thinking of Eliot's contemporaries.

The Treachery of Monstrosity

updated: 
Saturday, September 13, 2014 - 5:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
MEARCSTAPA

Call for Papers: Medieval Association of the Pacific (MAP) 2015
Session: The Treachery of (Monstrous) Images: This is Not a Monster
Sponsor: MEARCSTAPA
Organizers: Asa Mittman, California State University Chico, and Thea Cervone, University of Southern California
Presider: Thea Cervone

[UPDATE] (NeMLA panel; due Sept. 30) "The Moment Made Eternal": At The Intersection of Photography and Poetry

updated: 
Saturday, September 13, 2014 - 12:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA 2015 - Toronto

Writing about Alfred Stieglitz's photography in 1923, Hart Crane said, "Speed is at the bottom of it all. The hundredth of a second caught so precisely that the motion is continued from the picture indefinitely: the moment made eternal" (qtd. in Sontag's On Photography 65). A thoroughly modern art form, photography reflects the sense of urgency and impulse to record found often in poetry. As discrete units of artistic representation, the photographic image and the poem unveil new ways of looking and interpreting. Both art forms seek to represent that moment, that impression attempting to make the moment eternal, in the image and in the text.

[UPDATE] Digital Diversity 2015: Writing | Feminism | Culture DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Saturday, September 13, 2014 - 11:52am
full name / name of organization: 
MacEwan University and University of Alberta
contact email: 

How have new technologies transformed literary and cultural histories? How do they enable critical practices of scholars working in and outside of digital humanities? Have decades of digital studies enhanced, altered, or muted the project to recover and represent more diverse histories of writers, thinkers, and artists positioned differently by gender, race, ethnicity, sexualities, social class and/or global location?

Call for Submissions

updated: 
Saturday, September 13, 2014 - 10:40am
full name / name of organization: 
Digital Philology
contact email: 

[With apologies for cross-posting]

Call for Submissions
Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

/Digital Philology/ is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of medieval vernacular texts and cultures. Founded by Stephen G. Nichols and Nadia R. Altschul, the journal aims to foster scholarship that crosses disciplines upsetting traditional fields of study, national boundaries, and periodizations. /Digital Philology/ also encourages both applied and theoretical research that engages with the digital humanities and shows why and how digital resources require new questions, new approaches, and yield radical results.

You may browse the journal's contents here:

April 2015 Issue - Ethos: A Digital Review of Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics

updated: 
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 9:48pm
full name / name of organization: 
Benjamin Mangrum / University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
contact email: 

Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics—an interdisciplinary digital forum and peer-reviewed journal based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill—invites submissions for its April 2015 issue (www.ethosreview.org). For this issue of the Ethos journal, we invite submissions of original scholarly work considering topics relevant to the project's broad intellectual interests in the arts, humanities, and public ethics.

Off the Page: Verbal and Visual Manifestations of Poetry, Toronto, 30 April-3 May 2015

updated: 
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 1:19pm
full name / name of organization: 
Sarah Jensen / NeMLA
contact email: 

What are the imaginative possibilities of poetry outside the written page? What can this type of intersection reveal about the poetic text and about the text in relation? We welcome papers that discuss both ekphrasis and adaptation. Papers might consider poetry in relation to sculpture (including sound sculpture), photography, music, painting, performance, film, and other arts.

Apollon eJournal - Undergraduate Submissions deadline 9/15/2013

updated: 
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 9:51am
full name / name of organization: 
Apollon: eJournal of Undergraduate Research in the Humanities

Check the website, www.apollonejournal.org, for submission details on publication, or for an application to work with us.

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION
Apollon invites undergraduate students to get published in, review submissions for, or help edit the fourth issue of our peer-reviewed eJournal, Apollon. By publishing superior examples of undergraduate academic work, Apollon highlights the importance of undergraduate research in the humanities. Apollon welcomes submissions that feature image, text, sound, and a variety of presentation platforms in the process of showcasing the many species of undergraduate research.

[UPDATE] New Contexts for American Poetry in the 1950's and 1960's

updated: 
Thursday, September 11, 2014 - 6:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
The Charles Olson Society
contact email: 

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 26-28, 2015. We are interested in abstracts pertaining to poetry in the fifties and sixties, especially those that draw attention to uncommon readings. Though Donald Allen's influential anthology The New American Poetry divided American poetry into distinct schools (Black Mountain, San Francisco, Beat, New York) and contributed to its division into distinct styles (Experimental, Academic, and Confessional), Allen's model creates too many internal and external contradictions.

CFP: Literature (General) Southwest PCA/ACA (11/1/14; 2/11-2/14/15)

updated: 
Thursday, September 11, 2014 - 5:42pm
full name / name of organization: 
Southwest Popular Culture American Culture Association
contact email: 

Organizers of the 36th annual Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association conference seek paper and panel submissions to the "Literature (General)" category. This area will provide a forum for scholarly presentations on literary subjects outside of our more specific Literature areas. (Before submitting to the general area, please peruse the specific area list at:
http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/#literature.)

The Poetics/Politics of Post-Postmodernism

updated: 
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 3:14pm
full name / name of organization: 
Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE)
contact email: 

In the epilogue to the second edition of The Politics of Postmodernism, Linda Hutcheon heralds the closure of the very period she helped to define: "Let's just say it," she admits, "it's over" (2002: 165-166). This view has in recent years been echoed by an increasing number of cultural critics, who cite the failure of the postmodern aesthetic—developed in the 1970s and characterized by fragmentation, self-reflexivity, and irony—to embody the very real ethical and political concerns of twenty-first century citizens (cf. Eshelman, 2008; Kirby, 2009; Toth, 2010; Vermeulen and van den Akker, 2010; Abrahamson, 2013).

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