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Submit your poems to These Fragile Lilacs

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:01pm
These Fragile Lilacs Poetry Magazine

The deadine for submissions for our inaugural volume is May 31, 2015.

Guidelines (full guidelines can be found at thesefragilelilacspoetry.com )

Send poetry submissions to thesefragilelilacs@gmail.com

Please do *not* include any attachments; instead, paste the poems you would like to be submitted directly into your email. You may submit up to five poems per submission cycle.

Include a short (2 to 3 sentence) biography with your submission.

Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but if your poetry gets accepted elsewhere, please let us know ASAP.

We try to respond within four to six weeks, but, usually, we will get back to you within two weeks.

MPCA- Southern Literature and Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 7:40pm
Midwest Popular Culture Association

Call for Papers
The Southern Literature and Popular Culture area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association seeks panel and paper proposals for the annual Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association conference, this year to be held Oct. 1-4 at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza in Cincinnati, OH.
The area seeks papers whose topics address any aspect of Southern literature or popular culture. This includes works by southerners OR about the south. Topics might address, but are not in any way limited to:
- Literature (either Southern in setting, by author, or theme)
-Television (Justified, Southern reality television shows including Duck Dynasty, etc)
- Film and Theatre

BIRTH STUDIES AREA MPCA/ACA Oct. 1-4, 2015 (deadline: April 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 7:31pm
Todd Comer

Papers and panel proposals focused around the cultural framing or representation (in comics, film, literature, religious and medical practices, etc.) of birth or the birthing process are welcome. I welcome any theoretical or critical approaches that address birth (understood broadly). Having said that, here is a particular issue of interest:

British Literature and Culture: 20th and 21st Century (PAMLA Standing Session, Nov 6-8, 2015) Deadline May 15th

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 4:28pm
PAMLA

This standing session welcomes proposals in any area of 20th and 21st century British literature and culture. From poetry to novels, drama to fashion, music to the shape of empire, the session aims to provide an open space for new engagements with British literary and cultural productions of the last century. Please submit 500-word proposals to aburgin@u.washington.edu.

REOPENED: The[?] Archive- special edition of the journal Critical Survey

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 1:42pm
Critical Survey

In almost a reactionary response to New Criticism and a development from Historicism, literary researchers are using archival research more and more to develop textual analysis. Whether this research is more historically based or is textual to the point of analysing printing ink and the construction of a text, special collections, museum, and archives are considered a valuable resource. Even in the abstract, the idea of 'the' archive, while being embraced is simultaneously being challenged both for its exclusions and its very definition. How has the/an archive or the very idea of an archive affected/enhanced your own work?

Call for Book Chapters: Gerard Manley Hopkins's Poetic Legacies

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 12:44pm
Daniel Westover / East Tennessee State University

Co-editors Daniel Westover and William Wright invite chapter proposals for 'The Fire that Breaks': Gerard Manley Hopkins's Poetic Legacies, a new volume of critical essays focusing on the diverse and continuing influence of Gerard Manley Hopkins.

[UPDATE] Reminder: MSA 17 - Modernism's Reiterations

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:36am
Meghan O'Hara / Tom Stuart

In "Tradition and the Practice of Poetry", T.S. Eliot states that "The perpetual task of poetry is to make all things new. Not necessarily to make new things." In a similar vein, in ABC of Reading, Ezra Pound famously argues that literature is "news that stays news". Years after its hey-day, how do we understand modernism's commitment to the "new"? From a contemporary standpoint, how has modernism's past been made new again? From W.B. Yeats' turning gyre, to Charlie Chaplin's persistent factory gears in Modern Times, we can gather that when it comes to modernism, "revolution" need not only mean change, but also the very cyclicality of change itself.

[Update - deadline extended] 'Perfectly phrased and quite as true': Aphoristic Modernity, 1890–1950

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 8:25am
Dr Kostas Boyiopoulos and Dr Michael Shallcross

We are extending the deadline for submission of abstracts for the conference, '"Perfectly phrased and quite as true": Aphoristic Modernity, 1890–1950', to 1st May 2015 to enable anyone who narrowly missed the deadline to submit their proposal.

We invite proposals that explore aphoristic and epigrammatic writing from any number of diverse perspectives, from the theoretical to the literary-historical, the political to the playful. The periodization should be considered a broad template rather than a strict delimitation - we are happy to consider papers on writers whose work falls slightly outside this bracket. Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to aphoristicmodernity@gmail.com

Bloomsbury C21 Writings Conference - Writing and Insecurity: Writing the Twenty-first Century, 24-25 Sept 15 (deadline: 28 June)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 7:54am
C21: Centre for Research in Twenty-First Century Writings, University of Brighton

Bloomsbury C21 Writings Annual International Conference 2015

Writing And Insecurity: Writing the Twenty-first Century
24-25 September 2015, University of Brighton, UK

In the impasse induced by crisis, being treads water; mainly, it does not drown. Even those whom you would think of as defeated are living beings figuring out how to stay attached to life from within it, and to protect what optimism they have for that, at least. - Lauren Berlant, "Cruel Optimism"

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