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Call for Papers: Essays on the Practice and Teaching of Creative Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 1:58pm
Writing Commons

Writing Commons is a free, global, peer-reviewed, award winning Open Text for college level writers, college faculty, and the everyday writer. Think of it as an ever-growing handbook on writing studies, broadly defined. Currently, Writing Commons seeks submissions for the Creative Writing section of the journal. Editorial interests in this area are broad; however, keeping in line with the purview of the journal, articles submitted for publication should have depth, details, and provide concrete examples, such as hyperlinks or other methods that provide readers quick access to the important information discussed in the article itself.

Identity Across the Curriculum

updated: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 2:50am
Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to submit presentations for a conference that explores, challenges, and re-imagines the concept of identity.

This conference will allow students to present on a variety of issues and themes related to identity. Identity, in this context, can refer to an individual or group and comprises various registers—including race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexuality, nationality, ability, religion, political affiliation, etc. Also, identity can be explored in multiplicity: considering how certain identities impact others.

PAMLA 2015: "Narrative and Time: Visuality in Modern and Contemporary American Literature"

updated: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 12:48am
PAMLA 2015 - November 6-8, 2015 - Portland, Oregon

The intersection of the literary and the visual is fraught with questions pertaining to time. As Walter Benjamin and Mikhail Bahktin argue, technological advances that fragment or preserve time, like photography and cinema, have altered our modes of interaction with lived experience. Similarly, Nicholas Mirzeoff argues that visuality is contingent on the prevalence or rupture of temporal and spatial configurations. Mirzeoff, like Paul Gilroy, specifically emphasizes the concept of the chronotope, a conflation of time and space, as a means of communicating and deciphering lived experience in narrative structures. This panel welcomes papers on the concept of time vis-à-vis visuality in Modern and Contemporary American literature.

MLA 2016: Black Women's Poetry and the Color Line (due 3/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 6:32pm
MLA / Heidi Morse

Special Session CFP: Reevaluating relationships between racial politics, aesthetics, and (non)canonicity in African American women's poetry from Reconstruction to the Harlem Renaissance. Topics might include, but are not limited to: thematic or aesthetic divisions within a poet's oeuvre and/or in contemporary scholarship, negotiations of audience and/or publishing venues, poetry of social protest, etc.

Please send a 250-word abstract and short bio to Heidi Morse (hemorse@umich.edu) by March 15, 2015 (extended deadline). The 2016 MLA will take place in Austin, TX from January 7-10.

SAMLA 2015: Poet-Artist Collaborations (Durham, NC, November 13-15)

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:58pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

This panel explores SAMLA 87's theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations found in book arts, broadside printings, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

MSA 17, 19-22 Nov.: Modernism's Revolutionary Geographies

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:27pm
Candis Bond

Modernism's Revolutionary Geographies*
*Please send 300-word abstract and brief CV (one page) to Candis Bond at cbond2@slu.edu by April 01, 2015.

Building on the recent €œ"spatial turn"€ in modernist studies exemplified by scholars such as Andrew Thacker in Moving through Modernity: Space and Geography in Modernism (2003) and Rebecca Walsh in The Geopoetics of Modernism (2015), and in keeping with the conference theme of revolution, this panel considers modernism's innovative contributions to the ontology and perception of urban space, focusing particularly on counter-normative cartographies and deviant spatial practices.

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