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Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA (March 21-24, 2019; Washington D.C.)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

Studies of versification tend to be silent on race, and with some exceptions (such as Anthony Reed’s 2014 Freedom Time), studies of race and poetic form tend to turn away from the mechanics of versification. As Dorothy Wang argues in Thinking its Presence: Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (2014), most accounts of poetic form revolve around the technical accomplishments of white poets, while minority figures are seen as more valuable for their poetry’s social or thematic content. What would happen if nonwhite poets were read for their proficiency with poetic forms, and were made the center of conversations about poetic technique? 

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Public Engagement (NeMLA 2019 Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
Nate Mickelson
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Public humanities scholar Doris Sommer argues that “learning to think like an artist and an interpreter is basic training for our volatile times.” She encourages teachers to involve students and community members in artistic practices—writing poems, performing skits, sharing music—in order to build critical literacy skills. Like many poets, poet-critics, and poet-teachers, Sommer describes aesthetic engagement as a way to produce critical insights and cultivate political community. According to this view, poetry invites or occasions experiences that alter readers’ perspectives. What we experience as we interpret a poem changes the way we interpret elements of everyday life. And these altered or enhanced perspectives open up new political possibilities.

Roundtable: Phenomenology and Poetics

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:53pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This roundtable will evaluate the relevance of the philosophical field of phenomenology—the rigorous study of the structures of consciousness and bodily experience—to twentieth and twenty-first century American poetry through a series of short paper presentations. “[W]ords … are,” Maurice Merleau-Ponty argues in Phenomenology of Perception, “ways of singing the world, and … they are destined to represent objects, not through an objective resemblance … but because they are extracted from them, and literally represent their emotional essence” (193).

NeMLA 2019 panel: The Use of Audacity and Candor in Women's Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Audacity” is having a moment in the women’s movement. Festivals, conferences and training sessions have used the term as shorthand for women speaking their truth and owning the power to direct the outcomes of their lives. (The Audacious Women Festival in Scotland and the Audacious Women’s Network in South Africa are two examples.)

Yet audacity is not new. Throughout history, outspoken women writers of fiction, poetry, and plays have positioned themselves in the vanguard of audacity, defying public censure and personal isolation to write candidly about their world. Transgression is a disruptor of patriarchal norms. Candor is transformational when it is deployed to pose questions, shatter stereotypes, and incite change.

Self-Translating as Creative Act

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:05pm
Mona Eikel-Pohen, Syracuse University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Self-Translations are No Translations at All” was the title of a roundtable discussion at the 2018 NEMLA in Pittsburgh, where participants discussed both their own self-translations and those by renown self-translating authors such as Nabokov and Miłes and also spatial metaphors occurring in theories of self-translation.

This creative session would build upon that discussion and in this specific format allow participants to focus on presenting their own experiences with self-translation and expound phenomena and examples of their own writings and translations to be shared with other creative writers and/or (future) self-translators. Topics to be discussed could include:

British Shakespeare Association: Shakespeare, Race and Nation

updated: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 10:30am
British Shakespeare Association Annual Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

 

Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Kim F Hall (Barnard College), Prof. Nandini Das (University of Liverpool) Dr. Preti Taneja (University of Warwick)

Swansea University is proud to host the 2019 British Shakespeare Association conference on the theme of “Shakespeare, Race, and Nation”.

In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

updated: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 1:09pm
The Renaissance Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 12, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.  

The Politics of Form in Early Modern Europe

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 12:08pm
Université Paris-Est Créteil / Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Call for Papers

 

THE POLITICS OF FORM IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

June 27-28, 2019

Université Paris-Est Créteil / Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3

 

Muriel Rukeyser: A Living Archive is inviting submissions

updated: 
Friday, July 20, 2018 - 1:54pm
http://murielrukeyser.emuenglish.org/
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

The website devoted to Muriel Rukeyser invites submission of short essays (for instance on individual poems); blogs (on any topic related to Rukeyser); approaches to teaching Rukeyser's work; creative work inspired by Rukeyser; and reviews of recent works on or related to the poet's life and work.  We are also interested in discussions/summaries of dissertation research, interesting archival finds, visual material, etc.

For inquiries, please contact Elisabeth Daumer at edaumer@emich.edu and visit the website at http://murielrukeyser.emuenglish.org/.

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