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Peer Reviewers Wanted - Print Credit and Honorarium

updated: 
Friday, May 27, 2016 - 9:40am
Layman Poupard Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

Layman Poupard Publishing seeks peer reviewers for forthcoming entries in volumes of the Literature Criticism Series published by Gale Cengage. Reviewers will be asked to vet an 1800-word background essay and a primary works checklist. They will also be asked to recommend published critical essays to be reprinted in the entry. Reviewers will be credited in print and paid an honorarium. Academic affiliation is required.

To apply, please send a short vita with cover letter describing your research interests to info@lpppub.com.

Current needs are listed on our website: http://www.lpppub.com/contact/work-with-us/ 

The Medieval “Freak Show”: Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 11:27am
MEARCSTAPA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 30, 2016

SEMA 2016 Proposal

 

Call for Papers for SEMA 2016

The Medieval “Freak Show”: Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

 

People and creatures perceived as monstrous or wondrous are often put on display for profit or exploitation. At times, this exhibitionism presents itself as “education.” What has popularly been called the “freak show” achieved its height via the emergence of working class entertainments that transformed visual cultures in the nineteenth century, as exemplified in P.T. Barnum’s circus and its sideshows, but also including innovations such as the stereoscope and the panorama, which prepared the rise of cinema and, later, television.

Dystopic Dickinson. Or Is It Utopic Dickinson?

updated: 
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 7:58am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association convention
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

South Atlantic Modern Language Association convention; Jacksonville, Florida; November 4-6, 2016 

Dystopic Dickinson. Or Is It Utopic Dickinson?

UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance, Sept. 15-17, 2016 (Undergrad) (proposals by July 15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:57am
University of Virginia's College at Wise
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

The University of Virginia's College at Wise’s Medieval-Renaissance Conference is pleased to accept abstracts for our thirtieth conference.  The conference is an open event that promotes scholarly discussion in all disciplines of Medieval and Renaissance studies.  Papers by undergraduates covering any area of medieval and renaissance studies—including literature, language, history, philosophy, science, pedagogy, and the arts—are welcome.  Abstracts for papers should be around 300 words in length and should be accompanied by a brief letter of recommendation from a faculty sponsor (the latter can be mailed or emailed separately).  A branch campus of the University of Virginia, the University of Virginia’s College at Wise is a public four-year liberal arts c

25th Annual English Language and Literatures Conference, Nov. 12th, 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 12, 2016 - 3:03pm
Department of English and Foreign Languages, University of St. Francis, Joliet, IL
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
for the 25th Annual English Language and Literatures Conference
to be held at the University of St. Francis in Joliet, IL on Saturday, November 12, 2016
Featuring Roger Reeves as keynote speaker

Recent grads and current undergrads are invited to submit completed papers or presentations of creative writing to ell@stfrancis.edu no later than Sept. 15, 2016 in any of the following categroies:

English literatures ● literatures in translation ● comparative literature ● critical theory ● film ● creative writing ● teaching English

Special sessions for introductory students

Call for Papers: LiNQ 2016 Place, Past, Perspective issue

updated: 
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:42am
Literature in North Queensland (LiNQ)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Perspective, in the context of time or place, is one of the primary orienting tools of narrative.  In life and story, new or different perspectives can reveal hitherto hidden aspects of realty, and differences in perspective lead to misunderstanding or conflict. In literature ranging from the English poet William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience to the Australian novelist’s Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap, readers are exposed to the possibilities and problems that emerge from differences of perspective. In the very act of reading and writing, readers and authors alike are forced to confront the points of contact between their own perspective and those of others.

Ezra Pound's Vision of Paradise in The Cantos

updated: 
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:46am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016

This panel seeks abstracts exploring Ezra Pound's vision of paradise as presented in The Cantos. By June 2, please send a 300-word abstracts, brief bio, and A/V requiremetns to Jeff Grieneisen, State College of Florida, at grienej@scf.edu.

Papers might also explore the utopian and/or dystopian elements of the epic poem, as the conference theme is "Utopia/Dystopia: Whose Paradise Is It?" The SAMLA conference will be held Nov. 4-6, 2016 in Jacksonvill, FL.

EC/ASECS 2016 CFP / Historical Poetics: Strangely Familiar?

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
Michael Edson / University of Wyoming
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 30, 2016

CFP for EC/ASECS 2016 (Fredericksburg, VA, 27–29 October 2016)

Historical Poetics: Strangely Familiar?

Recent scholars such as Yopie Prins and Virginia Jackson have identified and contested “lyricization”—the tendency to view all poetry as lyric poetry, as the solitary effusions of an expressive speaker—in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglo-American criticism that continues to inform much current scholarship. Prins and Jackson are nineteenth-century specialists, and they have positioned their work under the rubric of “historical poetics,” an approach questioning the relevancy of some of the most familiar and supposedly universal genres, modes (lyric), and meters (foot-scansion) by which scholars traditionally analyze poetry.

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