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Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 4:45pm
Philosophical Society of Nepal

The Philosophical Society of Nepal, and its reviewed Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry, seeks articles in a wide range of philosophical topics and from a wide range of perspectives, methodologies, and traditions within philosophy, and the broader humanities, particularly literary theory, cultural theory, aesthetic theory, disciplines dealing with religion (e.g. religious studies, history of religions), and semiotics.

[Update] Spatialities: Dynamic Places and Spaces. ABSTRACTS DUE JULY !

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 2:32pm
Rice University

Rice Graduate Symposium
October 2-3, 2009
Rice University, Houston, TX

Call For Papers
Submission Deadline: July 1, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Sharon Marcus; Professor of Literature, Columbia University

As the citizen of the nation becomes the consumer of the multinational corporation, our roles as inhabitants of space become increasingly complicated. Our literature, our faith, our bodies all speak to the different ways that we find to occupy the shifting territories of the postmodern landscape. Looking both to the past and future can help us to discover the real and imagined ways our cultures can develop in more richly and defined ways.

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline July 1, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 11:33am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

Critical Theory: The Text and the World. Submission Deadline: 10 July, 2009/ Conference Date: Sept. 17, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 6:34am
University of Exeter, UK

Call for Papers:
Critical Theory: The Text and the World
September 17th 2009, University of Exeter
Keynote Speaker: Professor Colin MacCabe

Critical Theory: The Text and the World is a one-day Postgraduate conference designed to provide a venue for students and early-career academics to explore a multitude of critical approaches to literary and filmic texts. This event will provide a collaborative research forum which can direct contemporary debates in critical theory towards concrete socio-political issues. These issues include climate change, the global economic crisis and the war on terror.

New Directions in Detective Fiction, Apr. 7 - 11, 2010

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 3:18am
Maria Plochocki/ NorthEastern Modern Language Association

Long marginalized as either not "literary" or conservatively pandering to bourgeois or other established interests, the genre of detective fiction has continued to defy doomsayers through its continued evolution, being produced by writers from a variety of backgrounds and likewise being set in a variety of milieux and so problematizing different sets of rules, conventions, and moral and other judgments. But what has been the cost or other outcome of this evolution? Has the genre truly become more inclusive, or has this rather happened through the hegemonization and repackaging of previously excluded authors, like various new voices from Asia, Latin America, and Africa?

Transpacific Visions of Native America: Collection (Deadline for Abstracts: September 15, 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2009 - 8:28pm
National Ilan University (Taiwan)

Western scholarship has historically adopted a vision of contemporary aboriginal literature and art as categorizable along racial, cultural, regional and historical characteristics. This tends to homogenize and de-nationalize the tribal, while simultaneously confining the Native artist to a North American narrative of "ethnicity." The editors of this project hope to highlight and perhaps challenge these "captive" conceptions of North American indigeneity with essays from prominent scholars situated throughout the Pacific Rim whose exposures to and experiences of Asian and Pacific indigenity in all its diversity enables them to undertake refreshingly new readings of Native American writing and art.

[UPDATE]--Women's Studies deadline extended to 6/30/09

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2009 - 5:06pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association Conference

WOMEN'S STUDIES AT MAPACA
The Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association Conference
Boston, MA
November 5-7, 2009

Women's Studies seeks papers, panels and roundtables that investigate and discuss any of the many overlaps between gender and popular culture. Topics include, but are certainly not limited to:
*women and the media
*women and politics
*portrayals of motherhood
*working women
*women and religion
*women writers, written women

The Marketplace in/and Twentieth-Century Literature (NeMLA, April 7-11, 2010; submission deadline: 9/30/09)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2009 - 2:40pm
Northeast Modern Language Association, 41st Annual Conference, Montreal

Ezra Pound once wrote, "Nothing written for pay is worth printing. Only what has been written against the market." As if in response, Robert Frost wrote, "Modern poets talk against business, poor things, but all of us write for money. Beginners are subjected to trial by market." How do market forces or market values function in twentieth-century English/Anglophone, American, or Canadian literature? Emphasis on literary representations of the marketplace and/or the tensions and contradictions that emerge when artists attempt to exploit the marketplace. 250-word abstracts to Steven Canaday at sbcanaday@aacc.edu.

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