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Fiction Writers (1960 to the Present) and Their Use of Fairy Tales (Sept. 30, 2009; NeMLA April 7-11, 2010)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 11:10am
Charles Cullum / NeMLA

How and why do fiction writers from the explosively experimental period of 1960 to the present use (subvert, disturb) the seemingly conventional form of the fairy tale? Both American and international writers are drawn to fairy tales. One approach to fairy tales is taken by American metafictionists, who find in them rich mythic patterns to disrupt in order to promote new and different constructions of meaning. Robert Coover, for instance, makes fairy tales the basis of a number of his fictions. In Pricksongs and Descants, Coover plays with characters and motifs from tales about Jack the Giant Killer, Little Red Riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast, and Hansel and Gretel in an exploration of human impulses toward sex, violence, and creativity itself.

20th Century Soldier Narratives: the Intersection of Fiction & Non-fiction

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 9:42am
Stacy Moskos Nistendirk

Solicitation for articles to be included in a collection of essays that considers the inherent quality of meta-fiction in 20th century solder narratives such as Vonnegut's, Slaughterhouse-five; Ambrose's, Band of Brothers, and the works of Tim O'Brien. French philosopher Jean Baudrillard discussed the postmodern qualities of texts that blur the lines between fiction and non-fiction, saying that a sort of hyper-reality is created. Among the possible questions presenters might address are these: What is the nature of the interplay between fiction and experience within the soldier-memoir, soldier-account, and soldier-novel? What are the genre distinctions at work in the soldier narrative as non-fiction or fiction?

Essay Collection: James Baldwin: The Price of Masculinity; Accepting submissions until 9/30

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 2:12am
Aaron Oforlea Ph.D

Submissions are invited for a collection of critical essays that examine James Baldwin's life, fiction, and nonfiction with the most recent scholarship from Black Masculinity Studies. Essays may employ cultural studies and/or a post-colonial critical lens for explicating specific texts as well as interdisciplinary approaches that demonstrate the relevance or usefulness of using Baldwin's texts to examine, explore, or discuss Black masculinity within other disciplines
(besides Literary Studies). Submissions by emerging, as well as, established scholars are welcomed.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):


Packingtown Review: 2d Issue Deadline -- Sept.1, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 12:20pm
Packingtown Review: A Journal of Arts and Scholarship from the University of Illinois at Chicago

The editors of Packingtown Review, published by the University of Illinois Press, invite creative and critical submissions through Sept.1, for its second issue to be released in 2010.

The journal of arts and scholarship, out of the University of Illinois at Chicago, publishes creative work including poetry, drama, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary translation. We also seek submission of scholarly papers including interdisciplinary scholarship, literary criticism, comparative literature, critical and political theory, rhetorical and cultural studies. We accept for consideration: interviews, critical reviews of books, films and the arts in general, genre-bending work that explores or challenges form, graphic art and photographs

Ireland and Ecocriticism: An Interdisciplinary Conference, 18-19 June 2010 (Deadline: 15 February 2010)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 10:18am
Maureen O'Connor, Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Ireland is a land of pastoral greenery, but its landscape is an arguably 'unnatural' construct, a topography shaped by a history of conflict and suffering. Gerry Smyth asserted in 2000 that 'Irish Studies and ecocriticism ... have a lot to say to each other', yet despite the centrality of the land to Irish identity at home and abroad, ecocriticism remains largely absent from Irish Studies in Ireland.

To Kill a Mockingbird

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 6:47am
Jon Mitchell

Articles solicited to add to a collection of essays on Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird.

Perspectives on the author, herself, are especially requested, as are perspectives from specific theoretical perspectives.

Due date for proposals. July 20th 2009
Due date for completed essays: October 1st 2009

Please send proposals in the first instance to Dr Jon Mitchell, jon.mitchell@nuim.ie

Star Performance (Deadline Dec. 1, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 12:12am
Canadian Journal of Film Studies


The editors of CJFS/RCEC - Charles Acland (Communication Studies) and Catherine Russell (Film Studies) at Concordia University, Montreal - seek submissions of manuscripts in film and moving image studies for the following refereed special topic issue: Star Performance.

Film Publics Reconsidered (Deadline: Sept. 1st, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 12:06am
Canadian Journal of Film Studies

The editors of CJFS/RCEC - Charles Acland (Communication Studies) and Catherine Russell (Film Studies) at Concordia University, Montreal - seek submissions of manuscripts in film and moving image studies for the following refereed special topic issue: FILM PUBLICS RECONSIDERED.

SSSL 2010 Conference (New Orleans)

updated: 
Monday, June 29, 2009 - 10:26pm
Society for the Study of Southern Literature

CALL FOR PAPERS: Society for the Study of Southern Literature [SSSL]
EVERYBODY LOVES YOU WHEN YOU'RE DOWN AND SOUTH: Cultural Capital in Hard Times
April 8-11, 2010
Renaissance Pere Marquette Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana

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