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popular culture

Soliciting popular culture essay for literary tourism collection

updated: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 11:17am
LuAnn McCracken Fletcher
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 31, 2018

Single essay sought for inclusion in a collection of essays on literary tourism and the British Isles, under contract for publication by Lexington Books in December 2018, to round out a section on contemporary popular culture and tourism. The collection explores the complex and mutually informing relationships among narratives of history, fiction and film, and tourism via a series of studies of physical locations in the British Isles.

No More Room in Hell: A Half-Century of Undead Media

updated: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 11:14am
FMSGSO, University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 30, 2018

Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Organization Annual Conference, University of Pittsburgh

 

No More Room in Hell: A Half-Century of Undead Media | September 28-29, 2018

 

TOLKIEN AS COMMENTATOR: PHILOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY, AND FANTASY

updated: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 11:07am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association 90
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 30, 2018

In his introduction to J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century, Tom Shippey argues that “The Lord of the Rings has established itself as a lasting classic, without the help and against the active hostility of the professionals of taste; and has furthermore largely created the expectations and established the conventions of a new and flourishing genre.” The impact Tolkien has made on not only high fantasy, but also on the importance of language and mythology studies is undeniable. The influences of World War I, modern industrialization, and more are evident in his works as socio-political commentary, despite his personal dislike of allegory. Tolkien studies reflects a thriving culture in and outside the university.

Transposition of Religious and Theological Concepts Through Worldbuilding

updated: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 9:12am
AAR, Religion and Science Fiction Unit
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 23, 2018

I am working to organize a panel proposal for this year's American Academy of Religion conference for the Religion and Science Fiction Unit. In particular, I am looking for fellow panelists interested in presenting papers on the topic "Transposition of Religious and Theological Concepts Through Worldbuilding." If you are interested, I would need your 1,000-word proposal and 150-word abstract by February 23rd so that I can draft a cohesive 1,000-word panel proposal before the final deadline. Please reach out to me if you are interested.

Fictional Religions (in Film, Literature, and Other Media)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 9:12am
AAR, Religion and Popular Culture Unit
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 23, 2018

I am organizing a panel in response to this year's call for papers from the Religion and Popular Culture Unit of the American Academy of Religion. In particular, I am responding to the call for papers on the topic of "Fictional Religions in Film, Literature, and Other Media." The creation of fictional worldviews is a fascinating aspect of robust worldmaking and mythopoesis, and the phenomenon suggests all sorts of interesting questions about the relationship between artistic creativity and the religious imagination, the dis- or re-enchanted qualities of the secular, the role of mass media in forming our worldviews, ways of life, and identities, and other issues.

Materiality and Invisibility in Theatre and Performance

updated: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 3:51pm
17th Annual UW Madison TDGSO Spring Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

The UW Madison Theatre and Drama Graduate Student Organization Invites Submissions for our Spring 2018 Conference

Materiality and Invisibility in Theatre and Performance Studies

April 14th, 2018

Edited Volume: Bollywood’s New Woman: Liberalization, Liberation and Contested Bodies

updated: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 3:51pm
Megha Anwer (Purdue University) & Anupama Arora (University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 15, 2018

This collection will examine the cinematic representations of the New Indian Woman in recent popular Hindi or Bollywood films. On the one hand, this figure is a variant of, and has trans-historical connections to, the phenomenon of the “New Woman” in England and the United States. On the other hand, in the Indian context, the New Woman is a distinct articulation resulting from the specificities of the nation’s tryst with neoliberal reform (introduced in 1991), consolidation of the middle class, and the ascendency of aggressive Hindutva or Hindu Right politics. In this scenario, as Rupal Oza has argued, the New Woman becomes a bodily site upon which these dramatic socio-cultural and economic upheavals are measured and contested.

Age Matters - Cultural Representations and the Politics of Ageing

updated: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 9:22am
German Association for the Study of British Cultures
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 31, 2018

In 2017, the well-known actress Miriam Margolyes proclaimed that “old age is going to be shitty” (Ferguson 2017). Such a negative outlook is nothing singular and looks back on a long history. Though old age has also been associated with positive characteristics and virtues such as wisdom and experience, more often than not the downsides of the ageing process have been paramount. From Socrates, who allegedly regarded old age as “the most burdensome part in life” (Xenophon in Parkin 2005, 55), to Shakespeare, for whom the last stage of life was “sans everything” (As You Like It, 2.7.167), to today, old age has commonly been understood in terms of bodily and mental decline and as nothing to look forward to.

Journal of Dracula Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 9:16am
Transylvanian Society of Dracula
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018

We invite manuscripts of scholarly articles (4000-6000 words) on any of the following: Bram Stoker, the novel Dracula, the historical Dracula, the vampire in folklore, fiction, film, popular culture, and related topics.

Submissions should be sent electronically (as an e-mail attachment in .doc or .rtf). Please indicate the title of your submission in the subject line of your e-mail. Send electronic submissions to journalofdraculastudies@kutztown.edu.

Reading Young Adult Fiction

updated: 
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 2:25pm
Sean Donnelly / University of Birmingham
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 9, 2018

Reading YA Fiction Symposium, Thursday 24th May, Westmere House, University of Birmingham

YA Fiction has boomed in popularity in the twenty first century, from blockbuster franchises Twilight and The Hunger Games to critically acclaimed works by authors including Phillip Pullman, Patrick Ness and Malorie Blackman. Once valued primarily as a pedagogic tool, YA is beginning to emerge from the shadow of Children’s Literature to become an exciting field of study in its own right.  Critics including Roberta Trites, Robyn McCallum, Allison Waller and Crag Hill have produced complex theoretical readings of YA, establishing the groundwork for specialist scholarship in this area.

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