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'The World is Changed': Fantasy Literature in the Anthropocene

updated: 
Friday, June 30, 2017 - 9:57am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In light of the current discourse surrounding the Anthropocene, and the growth of its popularity in the ecological conversation, this seminar seeks to unpack the various understandings and responses to the human-dominated geological age, specifically through the lens of the fantasy genre. The Anthropocene refers to “The Age of Man” and includes all aspects of the evolution of man, including the exploitation of resources as well as technological progress. Through its very identity, the Anthropocene question exists among the ranks of the current political and cultural crisis of the 21st century.

CFP: Stephen King Area-PCA Conference (3/28/18-3/31/18)

updated: 
Friday, June 30, 2017 - 9:56am
Stephen King Area-Popular Culture Association National Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 1, 2017

Stephen King Area

2018 PCA/ACA Annual National Conference

Indianapolis: Wednesday, March 28th—Saturday, March 31st  

CFP Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives (9/15/17; Kalamazoo 5/10-13/18)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:07am
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Past, Present, Future: Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives
Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
10-13 May 2018
Proposals due by 15 September 2017

CfP NeMLA 18: Keeping it Real After Postmodernism (Roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:28pm
NorthEast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Postmodernism is clearly dead—its death and what follows it have been theorized in a myriad of different ways, most recently perhaps by the special edition of Twentieth Century Literature entitled Postmodern/Postwar—And After in the spring of 2016. The advancements of digital technology and the pressing need to look beyond the human and onto a planetary scale of existence are frequent explanations for recent shifts in literary and cultural production. But what explains the resurgence of novels written in the realist mode?

Population, Ecology and the Malthusian Imagination

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:27pm
Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Overpopulation has become the ‘third rail’ of contemporary environmentalism: no major organization wants to touch the issue anymore. While it had been one of the driving concerns of early environmentalism up until the 1970s, exemplified by such seminal texts as Fairfield Osborn’s Our Plundered Planet (1948), Paul Ehrlich’s The Population Bomb (1968), and the Club of Rome’s The Limits of Growth (1972), concern with population control has since dropped off the list of popular environmentalist causes.

Reminder: Special Issue - Spineless: Online Horror and Narrative Networks

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:27pm
Horror Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

With the current spate of contemporary high-budget properties that have sought to engage and adapt online horror content, increasing attention has been turned to communities of amateur critics, writers, illustrators, and fans that work to create horror in digital space. Their influence has been felt in a variety of media, from the television series Channel Zero and Supernatural, to the film The Tall Man and video games like Slender and SCP: Containment Breach. Fora in Something Awful, “r/nosleep”, and the SCP Foundation represent attempts by massive communities to create negotiated fictions, imagining mythic spaces and enduring, horrific creatures.

JMMLA Spring 2018 Special Issue: Metonymy, Poetics, Performance

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:31am
Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

This special issue has a cluster of three terms at its center: metonymy, poetics, and performance. These three terms have to do with conventional structures and what it means to live in them. Metonymy, a trope in which common association lets one thing stand in for another, mobilizes conventional relations. Poetics, the theory of how a text’s elements work together, studies the structures through which artistic effects exist. Performance involves living out relations within structures like genre, medium, and circumstance. Together, these terms allow us to think through the metonymical relations among art, artist, and context.

Submission open for the “Manifestations of male energy in the world cultures” Volume

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:31am
Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations Jagiellonian University in Krakow
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

It is our great honour and pleasure to invite you to submit papers for the forthcoming publication that will be released in English and is scheduled to be published in 2018, in the Jagiellonian University Press series “Bezkresy kultury”. The series is the project of the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations that focuses on various cultures as seen from different perspectives and aims at publishing monographs popularising research deepening our knowledge of the world.
The volume will be a peer reviewed, independent publication discussing the problem of male energy and its manifestations across multiple disciplines, for example:
- Aesthetics
- Literature studies
- Religious studies
- Social studies

Of Tattoos, Piercings, and Other Augmentations: The Modified Body in Literature and Culture (NeMLA18 Panel)

updated: 
Monday, July 3, 2017 - 10:58am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Over the last few decades, body modification in its many forms and guises has experienced an apparent visibility, appropriation, and revivalism in mainstream media and culture. Spanning centuries of history, body modification can range in intensity and craftsmanship from “normal” (such as earlobe piercings or bodybuilding) to “hardcore” (such as full bodysuit tattoos, surgical modifications, transdermal implants, and even amputations).

ReFocus: The Films of Mary Harron - Additional Call for Chapters

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:24am
Kyle Barrett/Edinburgh University Press
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

ReFocus: The Films of Mary Harron

Edited by Kyle Barrett 

Edinburgh University Press

Series Editors: Gary D. Rhodes and Robert Singer

 

ALTHOUGH THERE HAS BEEN A GREAT RESPONSE TO THE ORIGINAL POST, THERE ARE STILL WORKS AND TOPICS WHICH ARE UNDER-REPRESENTED IN THE VOLUME. THE PUBLICATION WOULD BE PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN RECEIVING ABSTRACTS AND EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST FOR THE FOLLOWING:

- Exclusive interviews/discussions with Harron or regular collaborators (e.g. Guinevere Turner, Lili Taylor)

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