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Twenty-First Century Perspectives on Kazuo Ishiguro

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:41pm
University of Wolverhampton
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

The University of Wolverhampton, UK

                                                                            Saturday 1 February, 2020

The Centre for Transnational and Transcultural Research (CTTR) presents:

 

Twenty-First Century Perspectives on Kazuo Ishiguro

 

Contributions by, amongst others:

 

Jeannette Baxter (Anglia Ruskin, UK)

Andrew Bennett (Bristol, UK)

Christine Berberich (Portsmouth, UK)

Max Berghege (Wolverhampton, UK)

Historical Perspectives on Fan Culture (panel)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:41pm
Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS), April 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

CFP: Historical Perspectives on Fan Culture

(SCMS: April 1-5 2020, Denver)

Simon Armitage: Probation Officer to Poet Laureate

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 7:15am
Université de Lille
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Simon Armitage: Probation Officer to Poet Laureate

International conference at the Université de Lille, France. 12 – 13 March 2020.

 

Keynote speaker: Terry Gifford

 

Organisation Committee: Claire Hélie (Senior Lecturer, Lille), Samuel Trainor (Senior Lecturer, Lille), Marc Porée (Professor, Ecole normale supérieure, Paris), Carole Birkan Berz (Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris 3), Juliette Utard (Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne, Paris 4), David Creuze (PhD student, Lille)

 

Call for Papers 

 

Call for chapters on The Fast and the Furious films

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:39pm
Dr Joshua Gulam, Liverpool Hope University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Editors - Dr Joshua Gulam (Liverpool Hope University), Dr Sarah Feinstein (University of Leeds), and Dr Fraser Elliott (University of Salford)

We are seeking chapter proposals for an edited collection on the culture, commerce, and ideology of The Fast and the Furious films.

The Ludic Outlaw: Medievalism, Games, Sport, and Play (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), Kalamazoo 2020
     

Cross-platform video games are now so popular as to constitute a financial threat to Netflix and other digital content services. One feature of many of these games is the ludic outlaw figure—found, for example, in the 2016 multiplayer Overwatch—that works to resist oppression within the game world. Because they signify popular definitions of justice and communal welfare, modern digital outlaws frequently evoke medieval outlaw representations, such as Robin Hood. In what specific ways do enduring medieval outlaw tropes function as model responses to oppression in modern games?

Call for Journal Articles—Queerness in the Digital Age

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
Tom Welch, The Velvet Light Trap (University of Wisconsin—Madison)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Queer Media and the Digital

Digital technology has altered all aspects of media cultures, including questions of identity that can affect everything from the production of texts, their content, their distribution, their reception, and more. At the same time, popular and academic understandings of queerness have evolved to incorporate expanding ideas of gender, sexuality, race, disability, ethnicity, and other identity categories. Not only has digital technology altered the ways in which queerness can be articulated, but queer media has also shaped the form and reception of digital texts. Understanding queerness in the digital age requires us to account for the changes in both queer studies and digital studies.

Comparative Culture and Queer Postcolonialisms: In Dialogue with Sara Ahmed

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:56pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019

When did become “feminism” become a word that not only spoke to you, but spoke you, spoke of your existence, spoke you into existence? -Living a Feminist Life (Sara Ahmed, 2017)

When interviewed by Ray Filar about her book, Living a Feminist Life (2017), scholar Sara Ahmed is asked about the word “feminism.”1 She replies the following:

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Anglo-Saxon Speculative Fictions

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (please see our other CFPs for the additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

Fandom: The Next Generation (edited collection)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 4:12pm
Bridget Kies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Fandom: The Next Generation
Transgenerational Fans and Long-Running Media Franchises

CFP for contributions to edited collection

Imagine taking your child to see The Last Jedi after your own parents took you to see Return of the Jedi when you were small. Picture a grandmother, mother, and daughter sitting down to watch reruns of The Golden Girls together. What keeps fans interested in after so many years? How do long-running franchises, revivals, and reboots appeal to new audiences? How do social and political changes affect longtime fan experiences? This book sets out to explore a relatively unstudied aspect of fan and audience studies: longtime fans and generational turnover.

ICMS 2020: Medievalist as Auctor

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:28pm
Erin K. Wagner
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Whether we consider the high fantasy of Lewis and Tolkien or the contemporary rise in historical fiction set during the Middle Ages, it must be acknowledged that medievalists (and scholars more generally) have long been linked with creative writing. In an era of academia where the traditional university job is far from assured and where representations of the Middle Ages are co-opted by white nationalists, we must acknowledge the wider benefits and contributions of the humanities, while promoting a diverse picture of the Middle Ages. It is more important than ever that the scholastic community embrace its creative side.

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