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CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND POPULAR CULTURE

updated: 
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:43am
full name / name of organization: 
SAMLA
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, May 30, 2016

CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND POPULAR CULTURE

This panel invites papers that focus on any aspect of contemporary Spanish American literature and popular culture. By May 30, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to co-chairs Elisabeth Austin, Virginia Tech (elaustin@vt.edu) and Elena Lahr-Vivaz, Rutgers University, Newark (el431@rutgers.edu).

Call for Papers: LiNQ 2016 Place, Past, Perspective issue

updated: 
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:42am
full name / name of organization: 
Literature in North Queensland (LiNQ)
deadline: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Perspective, in the context of time or place, is one of the primary orienting tools of narrative.  In life and story, new or different perspectives can reveal hitherto hidden aspects of realty, and differences in perspective lead to misunderstanding or conflict. In literature ranging from the English poet William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience to the Australian novelist’s Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap, readers are exposed to the possibilities and problems that emerge from differences of perspective. In the very act of reading and writing, readers and authors alike are forced to confront the points of contact between their own perspective and those of others.

Young Adult Literature and the Postsecular [Update]

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 11:14am
full name / name of organization: 
Jacob Stratman
contact email: 
deadline: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

I am interested in collecting essays that explore religious belief and practice in contemporary young adult fiction (written after 2001).  There are several questions that each chapter will address:  How are the religious experiences of teenagers expressed in contemporary young adult literature?  What is the relationship between the characters’ religious beliefs/values and their interactions with parents, their friends, their schools, and their societies (real and fantastic)?  How do young adult authors use religious texts, traditions, and beliefs to add layers of meaning to their characters, settings, and plots?  How does contemporary young adult literature place itself into the larger conversation regarding the postsecular? 

Witchcraft & Catholicism in the Early Modern Period

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:11am
full name / name of organization: 
Rocky Mountain Medieval & Renaissance Association at the RSA
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

This panel seeks proposals which address works (artistic, literary, historical, etc.) at the intersection of Catholicism and witchcraft (demons, devils, witches, magic, etc.) between 1500 and 1700 in England and/or Continental Europe. Of particular interest are works which link witchcraft and Catholicism; critique governmental or religious responses to witchcraft and/or Catholicism; and/or representations in literature or drama which compare witchcraft and/or Catholicism.

CFP - Apollon Undergraduate Humanities eJournal

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
Apollon, Humanities' Only Hope
deadline: 
Sunday, July 3, 2016

Apollona peer-reviewed undergraduate eJournal in the humanities, announces the call for papers for its seventh issue. The sixth issue is online with six peer-reviewed research contributions from undergraduate scholars across the US, and expanded features such as audio and video interviews, material and art history videos, and editorial pieces. Apollon invites college and university undergraduate students to help edit or get published in a new peer-reviewed digital humanities publication.

Student submissions deadline is July 01, 2016. Interested faculty should contact us with interest or inquiries as well. Go ahead -- you know you want to.

Vernacular Practices across East Asia: The University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference 2016

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
The University of Chicago
deadline: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

Call for Papers:

 

Vernacular Practices across East Asia

The University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference 2016

Friday, October 7th through Sunday, October 9th

 

Keynote Speaker: Bao Weihong, Assistant Professor in the Chinese Program and Film Studies, University of California, Berkeley 

 

Special Event“Kagawa Ryo Live in Chicago,” a performance of Japanese folk music

 

Conference Description:

Tennessee Williams Annual Review accepting submissions for 2017 issue

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
Tennessee Williams Annual Review
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

The Tennessee Williams Annual Review invites academic writing on all aspects of the Williams oeuvre, including his plays, poetry, prose, and correspondence. Studies of the productions of his plays and technical analyses of stagecraft and institutional issues are welcome, as is work on present-day productions of recently discovered and newly edited texts. The journal also routinely publishes brief texts that emerge from the ongoing examination of his literary records. Of particular interest is the history of the reception of Williams’s work and public persona in the postwar Broadway renaissance and in the period roughly from 1940 to 1980, along with scholarship on the lasting effects of Williams’s work on the cinema.

SAMLA 88: SCOTTISH UTOPIAS/DYSTOPIAS

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) 88th Annual Conference, Jacksonville, Florida
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, June 3, 2016

In keeping with this year’s conference theme (Utopia/Dystopia: Whose Paradise Is it?), this Scottish Studies special session panel welcomes papers that address topics related to utopianism/dystopianism in Scottish language, media, and literature studies, though the concepts “utopian” and “dystopian” may be subject to broad interpretation, and other topics not necessarily on the theme will be considered.

 

By June 3rd, please submit a 250-300-word abstract, brief bio or CV (no more than 1 page), and A/V requests to Joseph Schaub, Virginia Commonwealth University, at jschaub@vcu.edu.

Special Issue: Horace Walpole

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
Image [&] Narrative
contact email: 
deadline: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Image [&] Narrative is seeking papers for a special tercentenary issue devoted to the work of Horace Walpole (1717-1797). Articles covering all aspects of Walpole’s literary career are welcome, though preference will be given to those focusing on the correspondences between word and image.

Possible topics may include:

- narrative functions of images in Walpole’s work

- Gothic imagery in The Castle of Otranto and The Mysterious Mother

- art commentaries in Walpole’s correspondence, journals and Anecdotes

- narratives and catalogues of Houghton Hall and Strawberry Hill

- book design at the Strawberry Hill Press

- illustrations of Walpole’s work

 

Call for Papers: PAMLA 2016 Rhetorical Approaches to Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

We invite submissions for the Rhetorical Approaches to Literature panel, a standing session of the annual Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association conference. The 2016 PAMLA Conference will be held at the Westin Pasadena from Friday-Sunday, November 11-13, 2016, in Pasadena, California.

This year's conference theme is "Archives, Libraries, Properties." However, papers on any topics related to literature from a rhetorical analysis and perspective are welcome.

Paper proposals must be made to our online system, which requires a PAMLA website user account for access. Click on "Online Proposal Submission Form" on this page:

EC/ASECS 2016 CFP / Historical Poetics: Strangely Familiar?

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
full name / name of organization: 
Michael Edson / University of Wyoming
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, May 30, 2016

CFP for EC/ASECS 2016 (Fredericksburg, VA, 27–29 October 2016)

Historical Poetics: Strangely Familiar?

Recent scholars such as Yopie Prins and Virginia Jackson have identified and contested “lyricization”—the tendency to view all poetry as lyric poetry, as the solitary effusions of an expressive speaker—in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglo-American criticism that continues to inform much current scholarship. Prins and Jackson are nineteenth-century specialists, and they have positioned their work under the rubric of “historical poetics,” an approach questioning the relevancy of some of the most familiar and supposedly universal genres, modes (lyric), and meters (foot-scansion) by which scholars traditionally analyze poetry.

Call for papers - TheatreForum

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
full name / name of organization: 
TheatreForum: International Theatre Journal
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

TheatreForum: International Theatre Journal, dedicated to documenting, discussing, and disseminating innovative and provocative theatrework is soliciting articles and playscripts for its upcoming issues to be published in December 2016 and June 2017.

ARTICLES
Articles focus on performance and process. They are on an innovative company, production, or creators, but others subjects are possible. Articles on work produced internationally are encouraged. ~5,000 words and including high quality color photographs

[UPDATE] PAMLA 2016: American Queerness after 1945- Due 6/10/16

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
full name / name of organization: 
Grant Palmer/Pacific Ancient and Modern Langauge Association
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
American Queerness after 1945
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
114th Annual Conference
November 11-13, 2016
Pasadena, California

What new valences of power and politics have arisen in queer literature since the Lavender Scare? What are the consequences of rendering the private as public? What are its legacies for the contemporary? This panel welcomes a broad range of approaches to these topics within American Literature since 1945.

Transmitting and Translating the Eighteenth Century to the Twenty-First Century Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
full name / name of organization: 
NEASECS 2016
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, May 13, 2016

Transmitting and Translating the 18th Century to the 21st-Century Classroom 

It has been nearly twenty years since Neil Postman published his Building a Bridge to the Eighteenth Century. In this book, Postman compellingly discusses why it was becoming increasingly important for turn-of-the-century individuals to read writers like Voltaire, Diderot, and Johnson. It’s often a model for how we can look at eighteenth-century literature and philosophy through the lens of modern events.

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