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[FINAL REMINDER] NeMLA 2016 Panel: On the Limits of Computational Analysis in the Humanities (DUE BY SEPTEMBER 30, 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:00am
Dr. Jonathan M. Dickstein / Northeast Modern Language Association

The following will be a panel at the 2016 NeMLA in Hartford, CT. Abstracts must be submitted by next Wednesday, September 30, 2015. Please follow the instructions at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15986.

Direct an inquires to the panel's chair, Dr. Jonathan Dickstein, at Jonathan.Dickstein@alumni.cgu.edu.

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:55am
Postcolonial Studies@ Emory

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

Postcolonial Studies @Emory: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/postcolonialstudies/
Faculty Developer: Deepika Bahri, Deepika [dot] bahri [at] emory [dot] edu
Book Review Editor: Caroline Schwenz, cschwen [at] emory [dot] edu

Postcolonial Studies @ Emory is a long standing website that aims to create a more inclusive digital community for postcolonial studies scholars across the globe. Our website accepts book review submissions as well as summaries of important postcolonial works for our Digital Bookshelf.

NCTE Affiliate MEJ seeks essays for 2015-2016 issue

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:50am
Minnesota English Journal / Minnesota Council of Teachers of English

Minnesota English Journal
Call for Submissions 2015-16

Editors: Scott Hall (Irondale High School) and Michael MacBride (Minnesota State University)

MEJ, the online journal of the Minnesota Council of Teachers of English, publishes scholarly articles, personal narratives, opinion/position pieces on topical teaching issues, short creative work (mostly poetry), and pieces focused on pedagogical strategies of major interest to English and Language Arts teachers of all instructional levels.

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City. [Deadline: Sept. 30, 2015]

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 6:36am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) / March 17-20, 2016 - Hartford, CT

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City (Creative)

Creative Writing, Editing and Publishing / Canadian

Chair(s)
Kristen Smith (University of York)

Puneet Dutt (Ryerson University)

Abstract

Writers of fiction, poetry, and drama are encouraged to submit a selection of creative prose (a 250-word abstract) concerning the Postmodern aesthetic, urbanization, or the construction of home and identity for a fifteen-minute presentation.

Submit here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15861

Description

Edited Collection on the Portrayal of Black Men in Reality TV (Nov 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 7:27pm
Jervette R. Ward, Ph.D. / University of Alaska Anchorage

Contributions are being sought for a proposed edited collection that explores the portrayals of Black men in reality television. This collection aims to address representations of masculinity, comparisons to Black women in reality TV, class issues, queer theory, masculine psychology, patriarchal constructions, sexuality, invisibility, respectability, and social activism or lack of activism. This collection, tentatively titled There's No Blachelor: Portrayals of Black Men in Reality TV, is a follow-up to the book Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV (Rutgers University Press Oct/Nov 2015 - http://bit.ly/1NL1HdV ).

CFP Traveling With Gulliver, around Campus--Teaching Tools

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 5:55pm
Joel Sodano, University at Albany & Michael Brown, University of Aberdeen

This call for proposals is inspired by the versatile, prescient and even protean prose of Dr. Swift's most well-known work, Gulliver's Travels (1726). If Gulliver had a "tenure home" it would definitely be in the department of English; however, because of its relevance to so many disciplinary fields (economics, history, philosophy, to name the most obvious) Gulliver's Travels is finding itself in an increasingly interdisciplinary range of college courses. This CFP seeks a variety of pedagogy-oriented submissions that give insight into the ways Gulliver's Travels is taught in higher education.

International Conference Fictional Maps

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 3:01pm
Facta Ficta Research Centre & Silesian University in Katowice

Mapping the imaginary has always been a challenge for world-building and storytelling alike. Map of the fictional world subverts the very essence of an actual cartography: it represents a territory that cannot be discovered or traversed in a non-fictional realm and yet it delivers much more than a usual map: a promise of the journey into unknown. An exquisitely quotable phrase coined by J. R. R. Tolkien, who claimed to "start writing with a map and [then] make the story fit" is only reprising what have always been evident to cartographers and creators of imaginary worlds: maps precede territories and are inevitably becoming the most essen¬tial part of modern and postmodern storyworlds.

Australian Narratives in Film and Literature: Critical Perspectives

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 2:58pm
Ilha do Desterro (Brazil)

Ever since the early days of British occupation of Australia, there has been a major concern in finding a balance between the colonial ways of looking to the land and the difficulty, if not impossibility, of dealing with the vastness of the Australian territory and the diversity of its native peoples. Such tensions, far from being resolved, have created a literary and filmic system which reflects the multiplicity of approaches and constructions of Australian land and culture and whose examples, unfortunately, do not reach the non-English-speaking world as they should.

MELUS Special Issue CFP: Pedagogy in Anxious Times

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:57pm
Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the US

2017 Special Issue Call For Papers in MELUS

Teaching Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States: Pedagogy in Anxious Times
Guest Editors: Cristina Stanciu and Anastasia Lin

33rd Annual Illinois Medieval Association Conference: Medievalism, Feb. 26-27, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:47pm
Illinois Medieval Association

We are pleased to announce the 33rd annual conference of the Illinois Medieval Association. Since 1983, the Illinois Medieval Association has brought together medievalists from Illinois and surrounding regions. We invite papers and complete sessions on any aspect of the 2016 conference theme: medievalism.

[Update] Medievalism in Popular Culture - PCA National Conference (Seattle 3/22-25/16): Deadline October I, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:41pm
PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference

CFP: Medievalism in Popular Culture

PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference
March 21st - 25th, 2016 – Seattle, Washington

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (now the combined areas of Arthurian and Other Medievalism) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods. These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc. For this year's conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

"Realizing the Unreal: Victorian Speculative fiction in Context" - Abstracts due November 15, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:26pm
The Confidential Clerk: Journal of the Centre for Victorian Studies

The Confidential Clerk (ISSN 2454-6100), an open-access, peer-reviewed journal of the Centre for Victorian Studies, Jadavpur University, seeks contributions for its 2015/16 issue, 'Realizing the Unreal: Victorian Speculative Fiction in Context'. The issue will focus on Victorian speculative fiction and its generic, thematic, historical, and cultural contexts. Victorian speculative fiction is usually described as 'a flight from the real'; but we welcome submissions that go beyond this understanding to show how the Victorian imagination engages with the unreality of the real or creates alternative realities of the unreal in different forms of speculative fiction.

[UPDATE] Fools on the Premodern Page and Stage (Kalamazoo, May 12–15, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 12:44pm
Angela Heetderks, Oberlin College

Near the end of the Middle English romance Robert of Cisyle, the eponymous king—who has been punished for his pride by being made to serve as his own court's fool—acknowledges the error of his former ways: "For he ys a fole [. . .] / That turneth hys wytt unto folye" (CUL Ff. 2. 38, ll. 398–9). Such condemnations of fools and folly—in Robert of Cisyle, underwritten by the pope and an angel—in no way served to stem the tide of medieval and early modern interest in fools and folly. Literary evidence shows that many premodern writers and their audiences "turn[ed their] wytt vn to folye": fools filled the stage and page, pervading multiple literary genres.

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