all recent posts

Digital America Issue no. 6 | Now Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:31pm
Digital America: an online journal on digital culture and American life

Digital America is now accepting submissions for Issue No. 6. We are looking for critical essays, film, artwork, design, reviews, and process pieces that question, analyze, and/or hack the tools of digital culture. We are also interested in work that explores how new behaviors and new, global networks of power and influence are shaping American life. All submissions should engage American life and digital culture and/or digitization in some way. We encourage creative responses to these parameters as we understand the complexities of engaging "America" in a global, networked world.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Once Upon a Mother --ASECS--March 31-April 3

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:14pm
Kelli Wilhelm / ASECS,

Call for Papers 47th ASECS Annual Meeting and the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society Pittsburgh, PA March 31-April 3, 2016

Proposals for papers should be sent directly to the seminar chairs no later than 15 September 2015. Please include your telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address. You should also let the session chair know of any audio-visual needs and special scheduling requests. We actively encourage presentations by younger and untenured scholars.

CFP: Peripheral Modernity and the South Asian Literary-World

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:54pm
24th European Conference on South Asian Studies, University of Warsaw, Poland

The 2008 global downturn has compelled the social sciences and humanities to refocus on the concept of "crisis" in capitalism and rethink the relations between "core" and "periphery." What is crucial to this era of crisis is the emergence of the BRICS countries and the corresponding shifts in the world system. Debates on world literature and comparitivism have been alert to these readjustments (Moretti, 2000; Orsini, 2003; Damrosch, 2005; Warwick RC, 2015) as well as the proliferation of the neo-social realist novel (Adiga, Hamid, etc).

Managing the Adviser-Graduate Student Relationship (March 16-20, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:35pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

How are advisers best prepared to work with graduate students? How can we prepare graduate students to be, to borrow Leonard Cassuto's language, "the CEOs of their own graduate education"? What personal, professional, and institutional shifts are required to ensure that graduate students aren't infantilized and demoralized, but instead are professionalized and empowered, and ultimately prepared for diverse careers? This roundtable invites papers from graduate students and their mentors that propose answers to these and other related questions.

Please submit an abstract of ~250-400 words with a brief CV to James M. Van Wyck (jvanwyck AT fordham.edu)

REMINDER CFP Vladimir Nabokov International Conference - Biarritz, France April 28 - May 1, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:28pm
French Vladimir Nabokov Society

"Do the Senses Make Sense?": The Five Senses in Nabokov's Work

International Conference organized by the French Vladimir Nabokov Society

Biarritz, France April 28-May 1, 2016

After the 2013 Conference on "Nabokov and France" in Paris, the Enchanted Researchers – The French Vladimir Nabokov Society invites scholars to reflect upon the importance and significance of the Five Senses in Nabokov's work, poetics and aesthetics, for its next International Conference. Keynotes Speakers are Brian Boyd (University of Auckland) and Maurice Couturier (University of Nice).

"Language Centers and Specialization(s)"

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:24pm
RANACLES

Call for papers

23rd RANACLES Conference

"Language Centers and Specialization(s)"

University of Toulouse – Jean Jaurès, France

November 26-28, 2015

Since the 1999 Bologna Process and the implementing of the LMD reform in 2002 in France, Higher Education institutions, and especially universities, have undergone major transformations. Today, almost every student has language courses in his/her curriculum, even in Humanities universities where the sector of languages for students specialized in other fields than languages (LANSAD acronym in French) was structured quite late because of the historical presence of degrees in Languages Studies and Philology (for those students specializing in languages).

2016 Mardi Gras Conference, Submit by December 15, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:41pm
Louisiana State University English Graduate Student Association

Theme: REBIRTH

Individuals from around the globe travel to Louisiana early in the year to participate in Mardi Gras celebrations. Whether you're in it for the infamous brass bands, cultural masks, religious traditions, mounds of plastic beads, or the baby inside your King Cake, the Carnival and Mardi Gras Season is a time for rebirth.

"Laboring, Loafing, and Languishing": Work and Identity in Antebellum American Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016

In 1784, Benjamin Franklin writes of Americans "[we] do not inquire concerning a stranger, what is he? But, what can he do?" When the first Europeans settled the shores of what is now the United States, hard work was necessary for the very survival of the small communities, yet since then, the notion of hard work and a strong "work ethic" has passed into American consciousness as a (if not the) defining virtue of both an individual's identity and of national identity. This panel seeks papers exploring what literary work produced in "Antebellum America" (roughly 1820-1861) has to say about this idea of hard work as the primary shaper of both individual and national identity.

'To (Not So) Boldly Go': Science Fiction as Instrument of Colonial Enterprise (Roundtable) NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:20pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) March 17-20, 2016

Both science fiction and postcolonial theory are concerned with troubling normative understandings of movement, diaspora, and hybridity. Indeed, "The Stranger in the Strange Land" is an oppositional trope that is at the heart of both science fiction and historical colonial encounters. The other-worldliness and futurity of science fiction has offered numerous writers an effective (and increasingly popular) medium to critique political, social, and cultural issues, and in many ways presents an ideal literary landscape to interrogate the colonial enterprise. Even so, there is a relative lack of postcolonial voices in the mainstream SF genre. What accounts for this silence?

Conference marking the 40th Anniversary of the television miniseries Roots

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:53pm
Goodwin College

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show's producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many "conversations about race" that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Victorians Institute Journal

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 2:40pm
Maria K. Bachman / Don Richard Cox, Co-Editors

The editors of the award-winning Victorians Institute Journal are accepting essay submissions on all aspects of Victorian literature and culture for Volumes 43 and 44. Submissions of 5000-8000 words should be sent electronically in Word format to the Editors at VIJ@mtsu.edu. All essays should follow Chicago manuscript style.
For more information about the journal, visit the VIJ website at: http://victorian.utk.edu

Still Searching for Nella Larsen / NeMLA Hartford CT, 17-20 March 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 2:14pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

The year 2016 marks the 125th anniversary of the birth of Nella Larsen. In spite of the modest size of her œuvre and her early departure from the scene, by all accounts she ranks as one of the leading writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Well regarded during her brief literary career and for a few years thereafter, her works—like their creator—nevertheless slipped into obscurity. In 1986, Deborah McDowell's publication of a new edition of Larsen's two novels was a key element in sparking a revival of interest that took hold in the 1990s and has continued to this day.

Pages