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[UPDATE] Fictional Economies: Inequality and Novel, Essay collection with forward by Rami Shamir, author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:44am
Joseph Donica/Bronx Community College, CUNY

Fictional Economies: Inequality and the Novel

Joseph Donica is an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College.

Rami Shamir is the author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE (Grove Press 2011, http://traintopokipse.com/)

Abstracts of 300 words and full CVs due November 1, 2015 to
fictionaleconomies@gmail.com
Full articles due March 1, 2015
Projected publication fall 2016

Queer at Queen's 2015: HIV and AIDS, Politics, Memory, Performance

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:31am
Queen's University, Belfast

Call for Proposals: Queer at Queen's 2015
HIV and AIDS: Politics, Memory, Performance.
Brian Friel Theatre, Queen's University, Belfast,
November 15th and 16th - 11am to 6pm daily

The event is free to attend and open to the public.

Touching Hoccleve - ICMS 2016, Kalamazoo

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 9:18am
The International Hoccleve Society

Recent work in such fields as disability studies, book history, affect studies, the history of emotions, and cultural studies has raised provocative questions about the writings of Thomas Hoccleve, the fifteenth-century Privy Seal clerk and friend of Geoffrey Chaucer. Hoccleve's autobiographical accounts of his struggles with mental illness, social disaffection, and the physical strain of writing have offered modern scholars fruitful sites for re-examining the body, its textual representations, and its affects in ways analogous to current work in these emergent interdisciplinary fields.

Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters area, SWPACA (11/1/2015; 2/10-2/13/2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 8:47am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference

CFP: Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters area, SWPACA (11/1/2015; 2/10-2/13/2016)

Organizers of the 37th annual Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference seek paper and panel submissions to its "The Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters" area.

[SECOND UPDATE] NeMLA Panel, On the Limits of Computational Analysis (Due September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 8:17am
Dr. Jonathan Dickstein / Northeast Modern Language Association

The following will be a panel at next year's NeMLA Conference, set to take place between March 17 and March 20 in Hartford, Connecticut. Submit abstracts by September 30, 2015.

The goal of the panel will be to discuss the restrictions that current and/or potential computational approaches to media analysis have and/or ought to have in an attempt to delimit the evolving roles of academics in the humanities. Presenters might consider the following topics:

[UPDATE] CfP Ada Lovelace Postgraduate Workshop

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 7:01am
University of Oxford

Texts and contexts: the cultural legacies of Ada Lovelace
"That brain of mine is more than merely mortal; as time will show."
A workshop for graduate students and early career researchers
Tuesday 8 December 2015
Mathematics Institute and St Anne's College, Oxford

ACLA 2016: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Death Representations in Literature: Epistemological, Social, Anthropological and A

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 6:55am
American Comparative Literature Association

This is a call for presentations for a seminar to be held as part of the American Comparative Literature Association's Annual Meeting, that will take place at Harvard University between 17th-20th March, 2016, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Scholars from various fields are invited to submit an abstract (maximum 250 words), by uploading it to the ACLA website (http://www.acla.org/annual-meeting) between 1st- 23rd September 2015 for the proposed seminar, "Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Death Representations in Literature: Epistemological, Social, Anthropological and Aesthetic Aspects".

JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 5:21am
JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

JOSAAC AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON, ASSAM (ISSN 2348-0602) invites article submissions by for its January' 2016 Issue. The journal is a peer-reviewed and published annually and publishes research base articles on various subjects of Arts, Science and Commerce.
1. The contributions should be original and not published earlier or submitted elsewhere for publication simultaneously.
2. The paper should be typed in MS Word in A4 size paper, times new roman font, 12 point font size in the text and all heading should be 14 font size bold with 1.5 line spacing.

Between Vulnerability and Resilience: Representations of the Veil in Literature, Film, and Fine Arts

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 11:32pm
Umme Al-wazedi and Afrin Zeenat

The veil's ancient and modern history and its resurgence in our time is an important subject for discussion for those of us posing new questions about women and Islam in literature, film, and fine arts. In Europe and the U.S., the veil is often presented through errors of conceptualizations. The frequent and numerous discussions on the veil's role and function prove that the media, in particular, seems to be obsessed with it. Recurrently, these discussions run along essentialist and ahistorical lines associating Islam with the ideology of shame and honor. Moreover, the Muslim immigrant "problem" in Europe and the U.S. and the fear of Islam and Muslims in connection with terrorism has heightened the controversy on the issue of the veil.

Call-for-Papers: Higher Education, Community Engagement, and the Global Public Good (Abstracts: 10/15/15; Final drafts: 1/15/16)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 9:18pm
Higher Learning Research Communications

Special Issue on "Higher Education, Community Engagement, and the Global Public Good"

Abstracts Requested by October 15th, 2015

Final Drafts Requested by January 15th, 2016

Special Issue Guest Co-Editors: Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker and Dr. William M. Plater

Colleges and universities worldwide are increasingly aware of a shared responsibility for global conditions and of events that impact local communities—ranging from health care to climate change, from terrorism to technology, from food to finance. Not only do nations share a physical space, but they also share a future that transcends borders and that will be defined by responses to societal challenges and opportunities.

Call for Papers, Espionage and Popular Culture: James Bond, Espionage and Eurospy, Abstract Due: November 1, 2015

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 8:34pm
Michele Brittany, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association

Call for Papers:
Espionage and Popular Culture: James Bond, Espionage, and Eurospy
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 1, 2015

37th Annual Southwest Popular /American Culture Association (SWPACA) Conference
Conference Dates: February 10 – 13, 2016
Conference Hotel: Hyatt Regency, 330 Tijeras NW, Albuquerque, NM, (505) 842-1234
Conference Website: http://southwestpca.org/

Craft Critique Culture: Bridging Divides (April 8-9, 2016: Iowa City, Iowa)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:47pm
Kate Nesbit / Lydia Maunz-Breese / Heidi Renée Aijala (University of Iowa)

16th Annual Craft Critique Culture Graduate Conference
April 8-9, 2016
Bridging Divides
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the intersections of critical and creative approaches to writing both within and beyond the academy. This year's conference will encourage an examination of the "inter" of interdisciplinary—as well as the construction and deconstruction of boundaries between and within academic, public, private, personal, critical, and creative discourses—through an inquiry into bridging divides.

Roundtable: Breaching Boundaries Amongst Black Diasporic and Queer Communities

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:12pm
46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This roundtable discussion seeks participants whose work rethinks the relationship between Black diasporic and queer activism in academic spaces. Fighting to create habitable spaces for their respective communities, activists repeatedly find themselves on what appears to be opposing sides on the same issue. To propel the movement forward and dismantle the economies of heteropatriarchal white supremacy, we invite scholars and activists who investigate exclusionary practices by both Black diasporic and queer activism. Queer and Black diasporic activism reflects, what Jasbir Puar has identified as, the "global political economy of queer sexualities" that "repeatedly coheres whiteness as a queer norm and straightness as a racial norm" (xxiv).

Violence in Contemporary European Cinema--ACLA 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:02pm
Kingsborough CC

This seminar seeks to examine the representation of violence, in its public and private manifestations, in contemporary European cinema. Brutality, cruelty, and aggressiveness permeate not only the lives of victims of war (as in Grbavica [2006], Caché [2005], etc.), of totalitarian regimes (4 luni, 3 saptamani si 2 zile [2007], etc.), or of crime syndicates (Gomorrah [2008], etc.), but also that of the ordinary individual confronted with racial and ethnic injustice, poverty, or familial conflict (Gegen die Wand [2004], Lilja 4-ever [2004], L'enfant [2005], Entre les murs [2008], Fish Tank [2009], La Pianiste [2001], Pozitia copilului [2013], Leviafan [2014], Urok [2014], etc.).

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 6:23pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

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