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The Literacy Boom and Contemporary Anglophone Literature, Cambridge, MA, 17-20 March 2016

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 12:55pm
American Comparative Literature Association

Recent work on world literary systems has done much to illuminate the history, geography, and politics of our present-day literary moment. We now know much about the uneven circulation of narrative forms across the globe; about the ethical and epistemological challenges facing translation; and about the impact that literary markets have had on literary and cultural production.

Seminar: Reading Visual Cultures (ACLA 2016 Seminar March 17-20 2016 at Harvard)

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 10:40am
Co-Organizers: Margaret Galvan, The Graduate Center, CUNY and Leah Souffrant, New York University

It has been more than fifty years since Susan Sontag insisted: "What is important now is to recover our senses. We must learn to see more, to hear more, to feel more." To what extent has this lesson been learned? And how committed are we to teaching it? And through what methods? This seminar seeks to examine the possibilities and limitations of theoretical approaches that help us understand and assess Gloria Anzaldúa's claim that the "image is a bridge between evoked emotion and conscious knowledge; words are the cables that hold up the bridge. Images are more direct, more immediate than words, and closer to the unconscious. Picture language precedes thinking in words; the metaphorical mind precedes analytical consciousness."

[UPDATE]

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 6:58am
Gabriel Egan / De Montfort University

Online registration is now open for the following conference at:

http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/ESTS

"Users of Scholarly Editions: Editorial Anticipations of
Reading, Studying and Consulting"

The 12th Annual Conference of the European Society for
Textual Scholarship (ESTS) will be held at the Centre
for Textual Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester
England 19-21 November 2015

Poems Invited for Dec. 2015 Issue of Taj Mahal Review 27th Issue

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 12:10am
Cyberwit.net

Cyberwit seeks to publish the best in Poetry from novoices to established poets. Our published Anthologies and Journal Taj Mahal Review have poems that are sensuous, picturesque and impassioned. The poems reveal a fine combination of human elements of romance and the mystic & everyday realities. Cyberwit has published a myriad of new poets, and an increasingly large number of collections of verse. The significance of Poetry has not declined, and the 21st century seems to be the Golden Era of English Poetry. The name of Cyberwit is known to readers in several countries.

Taj Mahal Review is published in June and December annually.

Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology: General Call for Papers, 2015-2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:58pm
Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology: The Journal of the Graduate Theological Union

The Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology (BJRT) is a new, peer-reviewed journal of the Graduate Theological Union at Berkeley that is managed by GTU doctoral students under the supervision of the GTU consortial faculty. The mission of the BJRT is to be an international and diverse forum of original, cutting-edge scholarship in religious studies, philosophy, and theology that reflects the GTU's endeavor to be a nexus for "where religion meets the world."

Literary (De)Formations

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:16pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

Wilde on the Borders: Conference, Theatre, and Art, April 2, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 3:27pm
English Department, Niagara University, NY

On February 8, 1882, after his seventh lecture in America in just over a week, Oscar Wilde traveled north from Buffalo, NY crossing the border by train to Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada to play the role of tourist. In typical Wilde fashion, his response to seeing the falls was paradoxical, proclaiming it "one of the earliest, if not the keenest, disappointments" of a bride's married life, yet appreciating its aesthetic and spiritual power as "a sort of embodiment of pantheism." Wilde's visit to Niagara Falls is both microcosm and metaphor for all of what might be called Wilde's 'border crossings'—national, classed, sexual, religious, and aesthetic.

CFP: Fools on the Medieval Page and Stage, Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 11:24am
International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 12–15, 2016

Near the end of the Middle English romance Robert of Cisyle, the eponymous king—who has been punished for his pride by being made to serve as his own court's fool—acknowledges the error of his former ways: "For he ys a fole [. . .] / That turneth hys wytt unto folye" (CUL Ff. 2. 38, ll. 398–9). Such condemnations of fools and folly—in Robert of Cisyle, underwritten by the pope and an angel—in no way served to stem the tide of medieval interest in fools and folly. Literary evidence shows that many premodern writers and their audiences "turn[ed their] wytt vn to folye": fools filled the medieval stage and page, pervading multiple literary genres.

The (Native) American University

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:16am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

The Pedagogical (Re)Turn

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:11am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

Twenty years ago, Gerald Graff mused in "The Pedagogical Turn" that the future of theory would be in its reapplication from literature to pedagogy. In the intervening years, theory may not have reorganized the literature classroom, but it has transformed critical thinking pedagogy. The work of Wittgenstein, Jakobson, Derrida, Lyotard, Foucault, and others who have informed literary studies has recently been drawn upon by Mark Weinstein, Michael Peters, Tim John Moore and others to shift instruction in critical thinking away from general (informal) logic, which assumes a transparency of language, to thinking as embedded in language and thereby governed by varying modes of reading and writing.

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