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[UPDATE] CFP: What Devils Say, Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:16am
Texas Medieval Association (TEMA): International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan: May 12-15, 2016

Devils are everywhere in medieval literature, disturbing, challenging, and violating conventional spatio-temporal constraints as they move freely between worlds in order to torment the holy, spread disease, and tempt good Christians by making sin seem sweet. They appear as enchanters, tempters, playful tricksters, masked tormentors, terrifying beasts, mankind's lawyerly accusers, and on occasion, as sympathetic figures who happened to be on the losing side of a cosmic war. Although much has been written about how devils are staged, their appearance, and their interaction with those they torment, very little has been written about what devils actually say. How do devils represent themselves and their spaces of punishment?

From Hildegard to Mother Courage: Celebrating the Life and Work of Robert Potter (1934-2010). May 12-15, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:04am
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society

In his long and distinguished career, Robert (Bob) Potter sought to expand and even explode the temporal and geographic boundaries of medieval drama in general and the morality play in particular. As critic, scholar, playwright, poet, and activist, Bob Potter chaffed against categories and boundaries while producing fine scholarship ranging from publications on Hildegard of Bingen to the English morality play to Mother Courage, with many other critical and scholarly forays along the way. This session will honor Bob Potter's myriad contributions to drama studies in a career that spanned five decades and embraced at least as many forms of creativity.

[UPDATE] Performance and/as Exception (ACLA 2016, March 17 -20, Harvard University)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:03am
William Burch (Rutgers University)

The state of exception, theorized by Carl Schmitt and Giorgio Agamben, describes the state's ability to grant exemptions to the normative order of its own law, and in so doing to perform itself as a unified whole. But as this political encounter with the performative suggests, theatre too has a long history of engagement with states of exception, and with a capacity to disrupt and evade normative orders. For theorists and practitioners as wide-ranging as Bertolt Brecht, Harold Pinter, Valie Export, and Peggy Phelan, this rupture is one of performance's most insistent pleasures – and a source of its most trenchant social critique.

[UPDATE] ACLA 2016 Seminar: Morphology of the Trauma Text

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:01am
Jay Rajiva, Georgia State University; Jennifer Olive, Georgia State University

Seminar Proposal for ACLA 2016 (American Comparative Literature Association)
March 17-20, 2016
Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Editing for the Classroom, Translating for the Stage: Making Medieval Drama Accessible to Modern Audiences. May 12-15, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:57am
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society

Scholars have continued their efforts to make medieval drama accessible to modern audiences, producing several "classroom" texts and adapting or translating plays for performance. These efforts prompt several questions: How does the method of publication (print or electronic) affect the presentation of text and apparatus? How does the interpretive apparatus of stand-alone editions differ from those of thematic or period-based anthologies? How do performance goals affect the degree to which a production modifies the text? How do fixed or changing spaces, players, and audiences affect a play's production? The panel welcomes papers exploring these and other questions related to adapting medieval drama for modern audiences.

Making Time/Making Space: Temporality in Medieval and Renaissance Drama, 51st ICMS, May 12-16, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:54am
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society

This session will examine how early drama produced time (or experiences of time) often through the strategic use of space. Recent work on temporality challenges us to think about time as multiple, overlapping, simultaneous constructions. Theoretical work specifically related to theatre reminds us that performances do not merely represent time, but that they actually produce time(s), allowing spectators and actors to inhabit temporal spaces and to make meaning from those theatrical experiences. In the Middle Ages & Renaissance, not only did dramatic performances accomplish this, but so did other kinds of cultural performances, such as interactions with manuscripts, engagements with art objects, and devotional meditation.

[UPDATE] CFP: Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:43am
Keridiana Chez

Submission for papers begins today through Sept. 23rd.

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

CALL FOR ARTICLES ON RADICALISM (DUE NOV. 1, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:17am
Journal for the Study of Radicalism

JSR: Journal for the Study of Radicalism—a print academic journal published by Michigan State University Press—announces a call for articles and reviews for our tenth year of issues. We are interested in articles on radicalism in a wide range of contexts and areas, and encourage articles from humanities and social science perspectives. The Journal for the Study of Radicalism engages in serious, scholarly exploration of the forms, representations, meanings, and historical influences of radical social movements.

CFP [UPDATE]: Transgender Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 9:44am
Gender Forum: An Internet Journal for Gender Studies

In May 2014, on a cover featuring actress and transgender activist Laverne Cox, Time Magazine proclaimed that we had reached the "transgender tipping point". But have we? What would it look like if we had? While it is true that transgender activists like Cox and Janet Mock are appearing on our televisions more often, and transgender models like Ines Rau or Andreja Pejic are gracing the pages of magazines, transgender women (especially women of color) are still disproportionately at risk for hate crimes, and face discrimination in many areas of life.

Experiencing Prison 7th Global Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 9:37am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Experiencing Prison
7th Global Conference

Call for Submissions 2016

Thursday 17th March – Saturday 19th March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Publication of 5 Edited Books with ISBN

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:50am
Professor B.Panda

Call for Papers for Edited Books with ISBN
Last Date 31st December 2015
Generally, most people have their own ideas of what literature is. When enrolling in a literary course at university, you expect that everything on the reading list will be "literature". Similarly, you might expect everything by a known author to be literature, even though the quality of that author's work may vary from publication to publication. Perhaps you get an idea just from looking at the cover design on a book whether it is "literary" or "pulp". Literature then, is a form of demarcation, however fuzzy, based on the premise that all texts are not created equal. Some have or are given more value than others.

"Outside England...Far off from the world": D.H. Lawrence, Cornwall and Regional Modernism 12-14 September 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:45am
The University of Exeter Penryn Campus

International D.H. Lawrence Conference St Ives Cornwall 12-14 September 2016

"Outside England…Far off from the world": D.H. Lawrence, Cornwall and Regional Modernism

Organised in association with the University of Exeter Penryn Campus, this conference will be held at the Tregenna Castle Hotel St Ives to commemorate the centenary of D.H. Lawrence's move to the nearby village of Zennor.

Todo Fontanarrosa: la obra de un completo humorista / All Fontanarrosa: The Work of a Complete Humourist

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:45am
Dr Celina Bortolotto (Massey University, New Zealand) and Dr Annick Pellegrin (University of Mauritius)

Call for book chapter proposals: Todo Fontanarrosa: la obra de un completo humorista / All Fontanarrosa: The Work of a Complete Humourist
Editors: Dr Celina Bortolotto (Massey University, New Zealand) and Dr Annick Pellegrin (University of Mauritius)
Contact email: fontanarrosaproject@gmail.com

ACLA 2016: Philip Roth's Trans-disciplinary Translation: Psychoanalysis, Ethics, and Philosophy of Mind (proposals due 09/23)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:43am
Maren Scheurer / Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Germany

When Horace Engdahl, permanent secretary of the Nobel prize jury, proclaimed in 2008 that "The US is too isolated, too insular. They … don't really participate in the big dialogue of literature," many understood Engdahl to be chastising Philip Roth in particular, a leading contender in Nobel Prize discussions, who, despite his international appeal, has been perennially overlooked by the prize jury. To the contrary, translations of Roth's work are available in languages as diverse as Mandarin, Romanian, and Arabic, to name only a few. In his novels, Roth dialogues with such artists as Shakespeare, Chekhov, Edna O'Brien, Milan Kundera, El Greco and Jasper Johns. However, Roth's relevance for comparative studies is not limited to these exchanges.

CONTEMPORARY POETRY: THINKING AND FEELING MAY 20th-22nd 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:20am
Plymouth University, UK

This conference is dedicated to exploring the interplay and divide between thinking and feeling in poetry. In what ways might poetry embody a process of thinking? What's the role of emotion in recent poetry? Can thinking be divided from feeling? Does a poetry of the head preclude a poetry of affect, and vice versa? Are these the terms of competing antagonisms or productive dialogues? What's the relationship between the intellect and affect?

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