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ASECS 2016: Transnational Exchanges: Gender and Embodiment; Deadline 9/15

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:17pm
American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (ASECS) March 31-April 3, 2016

This panel seeks to explore how and why did gender, especially within the context of sexual violence, courtship and marriage, citizenship and travel, function as transnational exchange and a prism for engaging reflection on national identity and difference in travel accounts, histories and fiction? Did such reflections assume some continuity across cultures about what was meant by "woman," "man,"? How might have "love" and "family," serve as modes of exchange across cultures? Were alternative accounts of these terms, particularly in narratives describing conflicts in cultural expectations, offer opportunities for reimagining gender roles?

The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Literature (NeMLA 2016 Roundtable 15845)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 8:23pm
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook

With dynamic individual superhero/superhuman characters populating a world of complex, interwoven mythologies and origin stories, the films and television series of Marvel Comics Studios present an experiment with long-form transmedia storytelling that is at once both commercially successful and critically acclaimed. Given the ongoing debate in film criticism and media studies surrounding the degree to which analyzing films as literature is useful (or not), that such a commercially popular phenomenon also emphasizes artistic elements (e.g.

The Monster In The House: Domestic Ideology in Superhero Narratives (NeMLA 2016 Panel 15842)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 8:11pm
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook

Deadline for abstract submissions: September 30th 2015

In worlds full of superhuman heroes, mythological imaginary creatures and battle narratives of epic scope, what is the role of the domestic? In the recently released film _Avengers: Age of Ultron_, the titular superheroes hide away not in a high-tech secured stronghold but in a farmhouse belonging to the archer Hawkeye, his wife, and their young children. Barton's presence as the film's only parent with a seemingly stable domestic lifestyle provides a temporary shelter for our heroes, illustrating how the domestic can function as a stable ground for the superhero narrative to withstand its otherwise fantastic, explosive elements.

Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:22pm
Keridiana Chez

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 2:17pm
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas. In the United States, for example, people may look to the Constitution and patriotic songs or even the bible as foundational texts--texts that define (and limit?) national identity. We often see events such as the Salem Witch Trials, the Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement as critical moments of national formation, while people such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. represent quintessential "Americans.". These foundational texts, events, and people work their way into literature and pop culture in myriad ways as authors, writers, poets, filmmakers and playwrights incorporate, reify, or challenge them through their works.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets / Aug 25 Submission

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 4:53pm
Lauren Kimball and Caolan Madden (Rutgers University) for C19 Conference 2016

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets

What was the nineteenth-century woman poet like in real life? This panel seeks to unsettle current definitions by attending to her performing/reforming body and the work she did in the material world.

Trans/forming the Digital Humanities: Disciplinary Borders, Digital Frontiers

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 1:29pm
NeMLA 2016 - Hartford, Connecticut

Literary studies finds itself today at a double crossroads: as trans-formative digital humanities practice becomes increasingly accepted and visible in our research and curricula, so, even in more traditional methods of inquiry, has the unit of the "trans-" gained traction. Transnational, transatlantic, trans-periodic, transgender, and translational issues, to name but a few, increasingly structure and energize our readings and re-readings of literary texts. With this panel, we seek to move beyond a ruptural understanding of DH, with its underlying anxiety about disciplinary change, and to explore instead the potential continuities between humanities computing and existing methods.

Narratives of Forgetting and the Forgetting of Narratives - ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:29pm
Rutgers Program in Medieval Studies

Working forward from Mary Carruthers' foundational work on the construction of memory structures, this panel seeks to understand medieval priorities of what to remember and what to forget. Its central goal is to explore the ways in which people created, consumed, and destroyed memories in order to communicate information and ideas. It responds to recent work on the manipulation of memories of the past, which was often involved in defining nationhood and group identity.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

International Conference on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer (ICMFHT'16)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:50am
International ASET Inc

The International Conference on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer (ICMFHT'16) aims to become the leading annual conference in fields related to multiphase flow and heat transfer. The goal of ICMFHT'16 is to gather scholars from all over the world to present advances in the relevant fields and to foster an environment conducive to exchanging ideas and information. This conference will also provide an ideal environment to develop new collaborations and meet experts on the fundamentals, applications, and products of the mentioned fields.

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference 17th-19th August, 2016, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:40am
Romance in Medieval Britain Biennial conference

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference
17th-19th August, 2016
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

In the summer of 2016, the 15th Biennial Romance in Medieval Britain Conference will be hosted for the first time outside of the British Isles and Ireland. The Romance in Medieval Britain Conferences address the genre of Romance - understood broadly - in the multilingual literary landscape of the British Isles (and Ireland) during the Middle Ages.
The conference will feature plenary lectures by Suzanne Akbari (Toronto) and Corinne Saunders (Durham).

Madhouse, Medicine, Mercy: Treatment of Insanity in Wilkie Collins' Jezebel's Daughter

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 10:53am
Anamta Rizvi

While Victorian era was essentially marked as an age of impeccable scientific discoveries, with eminent scientists as John F. W. Herschel, William Whewell, Charles Babbage, William Buckland, Charles Darwin and others, Cannon is his book Science and Culture argues that in the 1830s and 1840s even the critics of science "took science as the ultimate criterion of truth" (Ruse 118). Being an age of industrial revolution, it was inevitable for people working in factories to escape the dreadful diseases. The rising medical problems led awareness in the Sate of its duty to control these medical issues. This acted as a catalyst of the already stimulated minds to vest their energies in the direction of medicinal science.

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