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Call for Submissions to Maritime Journal: Deadline Extended

updated: 
Friday, January 17, 2020 - 12:51pm
Kathryn Mudgett/The Nautilus: A Maritime Journal of Literature, History, and Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 8, 2020

Deadline Extended to February 8, 2020. The Nautilus: A Maritime Journal of Literature, History, and Culture, a peer-reviewed scholarly publication, seeks submissions for its eleventh annual issue, to be published in spring 2020. Contributors are encouraged to submit manuscripts on any aspect of maritime literature, history, or culture, following MLA style, using endnotes and the works cited format. Manuscripts are usually in the range of 20-25 pages; however, shorter and longer works are sometimes accepted for publication.

Oxford Research in English: Issue 11, Destinations

updated: 
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 10:24am
Oxford Research in English
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 1, 2020

Destination – the word itself concerns both journey and journey’s end. For this issue of Oxford Research in English, we invite articles that delve into arrival and setting forth in literature, as well as the textual, intertextual and extratextual ways one can examine literary places and spaces. “Destination” derives from the Latin dēstināre—to resolve, to determine, to destine— before journeying into French and arriving in English.

06/01/20) "Spaces," SCLA Oct 29-Oct 31 2020, Austin TX

updated: 
Monday, January 27, 2020 - 2:14pm
Society For Comparative Literature and the Arts
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 1, 2020

“Spaces”

2020 Meeting of the Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts

October 29-31, 2020

Hilton Garden Inn

Austin, Texas

 

Call for Papers

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – SUMMER 2020

updated: 
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 6:20am
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS – SUMMER 2020

Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS), an open access academic e-journal, invites original and unpublished research papers and book reviews from various interrelated disciplines including, but not limited to, literature, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, law, ecology, environmental science, and economics.

The Alterity of Affliction / Afflictions of Alterity

updated: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 8:25pm
Cultural, Social and Political Thought, University of Victoria, BC
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

The Alterity of Affliction / Afflictions of Alterity

University of Victoria (British Columbia), May 22-24, 2020       
Keynote speaker, Cindy Baker
Deadline to submit, March 31, 2020
Website, http://www.alterityofaffliction.com/

“Whatever pain achieves, it achieves in part through its unsharability, and it ensures this unsharability through its resistance to language . . .” – Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain

Archipelagic Memory: Intersecting Geographies, Histories and Disciplines

updated: 
Friday, January 10, 2020 - 6:55pm
University of Mauritius / King's College London / Centre for Indian Studies in Africa, Wits University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 20, 2020

Archipelagic Memory: Intersecting Geographies, Histories and Disciplines

University of Mauritius, 4 – 6 August 2020

http://www.archipelagicmemory.wordpress.com 

 

Confirmed keynote speakers

Ananya Jahanara Kabir, King’s College London

Isabel Hofmeyr, University of the Witwatersrand/NYU

George Abungu, Archaeologist and International Heritage Consultant

Anwar Janoo, University of Mauritius

 

Feminist readings in motion? International Conference in Pretoria, South Africa

updated: 
Friday, January 10, 2020 - 2:56pm
Bibi Burger
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, January 25, 2020

“Difference must be not merely tolerated, but seen as a fund of necessary polarities between which our creativity can spark like a dialectic” - Audre Lorde (1984)

 

“Living as I have argued we do in the wake of slavery, in spaces where we were never meant to survive, or have been punished for surviving and for daring to claim or make spaces of something like freedom, we yet reimagine and transform spaces for and practices of an ethics of care (as in repair, maintenance, attention), an ethics of seeing, and of being in the wake as consciousness; as a way of remembering and observance that started with the door of no return, continued in the hold of the ship and on the shore.” - Christina Sharpe (2016)

 

Continentalizing Global Modernism @ MLA 2021

updated: 
Friday, January 10, 2020 - 9:12am
John Hoffmann / University of Marburg
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 20, 2020

As the ambit of global modernist studies expands, the place of continental Europe in the geography of modernism is something of a quandary. Indeed, the continent’s place was never very clear to begin with. In her foundational essay “Periodizing Modernism,” Susan Stanford Friedman criticizes a disciplinary bias that favors Anglo-American modernism at the expense of writing from postcolonial nations. Yet Friedman also notes that the old, chiefly Anglo-American modernist studies possessed only a “limited continental scope.” Thus the turn to the globe––that is, the turn away from Europe––has consigned the continent to the disciplinary past when, according to Friedman, it was a marginalized domain in the first place.

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