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ALA Conference (April 6-9, Atlanta) Panel: Folklore in African Literature as a Tool in the Defense of Human Dignity and Justice

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 6:13pm
Allison Pine/ African Literature Association Conference 2016

This panel seeks to explore the ways that folklore interacts with the theme of justice and human dignity through the exploration of African literature. This definition of folklore includes all folk culture and orality, including folk song, proverbs, folk tales, folk art, etc. Folklore embodies human dignity and justice in its exploration of traditional ways and its insistence on the preservation or reclaiming of culture. One example is the exploration of traditional ways in contemporary literature and art as a way of preserving or reclaiming culture. Many African authors have utilized the folklore of their culture as a way of showing the depth and richness of their society.

"Hauntings" / NeMLA panel, March 17-20, Hartford, CT

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:50pm
Alla Ivanchikova (Hobart and William Smith Colleges) Monika Giacoppe (Ramapo College)

Description: In recent years, haunting has been theorized as a temporal aberration, as a form of memory (involuntary memory), as spectrality, as an absence, and as a structure of feeling (affect). Haunting brings us in touch with a history that remains invisible, creating a channel of communication with an entity that remains foreclosed and inaccessible. The The structure of haunting thus is always paradoxical, and is similar to what Mckenzie Wark calls dark media—the "mediation of that which can't be mediated." Haunting can have different levels of intensity; and most texts, just like most places, can be seen as haunted in one way or another.

"World Literature Assignment Exchange" /NeMLA roundtable / March 17-20 Hartford, CT

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:45pm
Monika Giacoppe and Alla Ivanchikova

NB: NeMLA guidelines allow participants to present both at a roundtable AND at a regular panel/ seminar. You can therefore apply to present at the roundtable even if you are already accepted into a NeMLA panel.

"World Literature Assignment Exchange" -- a NeMLA roundtable by the NeMLA World Literature Working Group
March 17-20 Hartford, CT

Monika Giacoppe ( and Alla Ivanchikova (

The Multigenerational Latino Novel: Structure and Nuance in the Latino Experience

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:42pm
Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, 2016 DUE 9/30

When we explore and critique Latin@ novels, it is a common practice to do so from the perspective of race, class, gender, and colonial identities. While we recognize that these thematic concerns are pressing, we sometimes gloss over the space where thematic and structural forms come together. Interestingly, some of the most important Latin@ writers utilize very similar structural forms, specifically the multi-generational novel—as a way to tackle these issues.

[REMINDER] American Literature Association Symposium: Frontiers and Borders in American Literature, February 25-27, 2016

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 12:23pm
Steven Frye/American Literature Association

Proposals are welcome on a range of topics related to varied conceptions of the frontier and American borderlands, including but not limited to nineteenth and twentieth-century narratives of the frontier, Western literature, the literature of nature and the environment, the literature of cultural contact, and science fiction. We welcome proposals for individual papers, complete panels, and roundtable discussions on any aspect of this important subject.

Due date for proposals is October 1, 2015.

The symposium will be held at the Sheraton Gunter Hotel is downtown San Antonio, TX.

ACLA Seminar: "Forms of Passivity", March 17-20 2016, Harvard U; Abstracts due Sept 23

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 12:06pm
American Comparative Literature Association

In a context where the active (voice, body, citizen) remains the privileged mode of life, the possibility of imagining passivity as a political alternative has been a major lure for critical and political thinkers. Some have also tried to break down the clear-cut division between activity and passivity. In one such instance Lisa Robinson asks, "what is the relation between passivity and will, within cognition?

[REMINDER] CFP: Neo-Victorian? Pop Culture, Lowbrow, and Genre Victoriana (Panel) | NeMLA 3/17-20/2016 | Submit by 9/30/15

Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 10:37am
Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association

In the rapidly expanding field of neo-Victorian studies, the million-dollar question remains: what qualifies as neo-Victorian? For guidance, many scholars have relied on Ann Heilmann and Mark Llewellyn's definition, which specifies that to be called neo-Victorian, a text "must in some respect be self-consciously engaged with the act of (re)interpretation, (re)discovery and revision concerning Victorians." The implication is that this is a subgenre for respectable texts, of clear intellectual pedigree.

Bodies at Work: Reimagining the Lines of (Re)Production

Monday, September 14, 2015 - 2:49pm
UTA English Graduate Conference

Bodies at Work: Reimagining the Lines of (Re)Production
April 7-8, 2016, The University of Texas at Arlington
Submission Deadline: December 31, 2015
Conference Chairs: Stephanie Peebles Tavera, Robert LaRue

The University of Texas at Arlington invites 200-250 proposals for individual paper presentations as well as proposals for complete panels for our fourth annual English Graduate Conference. Please include your name, institutional affiliation, and contact email in your proposal. For complete panels, please include an abstract for the entire panel, along with brief explanations of the intended presentations.